Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

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Akir
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Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by Akir »

Peace and respect to all!

Is there something similar to "druktongpa" in Tibetan? All I found was the male name "Drubthob". The fact is that before going to bed I thought about what Tibetan name would suit me. And at night I woke up with a pulsating and rhythmic word in my head. I wrote down this word in a notebook and continued to sleep. Now, it was like "druktongpa". Please, those who know the Tibetan language, tell me something similar to this word "druktongpa" and its meaning and translation. And what is the meaning of the male Tibetan name "Drubthob"?

All goodness, peace and love!
Om Mani Padme Hum!
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Akir
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by Akir »

I think I'm close to solving my question. I am very skeptical about dreams and other mysticism, but! Now, after a short day's sleep, I was visited by a thought with the name "DROMTONPA". And of course, many here know who he was. And I learned from a web search and Wikipedia. I've probably heard that name before, but honestly, I don't remember it!
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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by PadmaVonSamba »

Akir wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 5:51 am before going to bed I thought about what Tibetan name would suit me.
What’s the purpose in that? Are you planning to go undercover in Lhasa?

Usually, for non-Tibetan Buddhists who have acquired Tibetan names,
these are refuge names given to them by the lamas from whom they have taken the refuge ceremony.
EMPTIFUL.
An inward outlook develops outward insight.
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Akir
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by Akir »

PadmaVonSamba wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 12:30 pm
Akir wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 5:51 am before going to bed I thought about what Tibetan name would suit me.
What’s the purpose in that? Are you planning to go undercover in Lhasa?

Usually, for non-Tibetan Buddhists who have acquired Tibetan names,
these are refuge names given to them by the lamas from whom they have taken the refuge ceremony.
Working as a spy in Lhasa is a good idea and an accurate joke! :twothumbsup: :applause: :thanks:

When I took refuge as a group, the lama did not give names. It would probably be wrong to choose a name for yourself, I don’t know, but I accept your advice and guidance! Theoretically, I follow my Lama's Facebook account and it might be better to write to him...

How important is it to be called by a Tibetan name?

I would like to have a name, or maybe it's my ego that wants some kind of "spiritual materialism".
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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by PadmaVonSamba »

Akir wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 12:44 pm

How important is it to be called by a Tibetan name?

I would like to have a name, or maybe it's my ego that wants some kind of "spiritual materialism".
Well, it’s a bit of exotic fun. I knew a fellow who used to make up fake Tibetan names: Tungsten Gumdrop, Phuktup Tapedeck, and so on. That’s probably regarded as culturally insensitive today. But it was funny then. Some people only go by their Buddhist name after taking refuge. Others don’t. It’s not ‘important’.

In the Himalayas, one’s family name can reveal a lot about their family occupation or social class/caste status. By taking on dharma names, the Buddha’s followers let go of all past connections to social status. Everyone was equal in the sangha. Also, it symbolically meant leaving one’s old life behind and beginning a new life as a follower of the Buddha. So, there is an actual purpose to it.

‘DRUK’ means dragon. ‘Pa’ is a suffix used as a kind of identifier. ‘thongpa’ is a kind of Indian dish of curried paneer.

So, I guess ‘druktongpa’ would translate as ‘dragon cheese curry’.

It reminds me of a joke-story about a western Buddhist who prayed that he might enter a state of thukden when he died. This is a state of continued meditation, and the body remains warm and not rigid, no signs of deterioration for many days even though heart and breathing have stopped. but, his Tibetan wasn’t very good, and he actually prayed using the word thukpa, which means noodles. So, when he finally died, his body turned into noodles instead.
EMPTIFUL.
An inward outlook develops outward insight.
Malcolm
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by Malcolm »

PadmaVonSamba wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 1:17 pm
‘DRUK’ means dragon. ‘Pa’ is a suffix used as a kind of identifier. ‘thongpa’ is a kind of Indian dish of curried paneer.
drug stong means 1000 thunders or 1000 dragons, depends on context.
Vases, canvas, bucklers, armies, forests, garlands, trees
houses, chariots, hostelries, and all such things
that common people designate dependent on their parts,
accept as such. For Buddha did not quarrel with the world!

—— Candrakīrti. MAV 6:166
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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by PadmaVonSamba »

Malcolm wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 2:51 pm
PadmaVonSamba wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 1:17 pm
‘DRUK’ means dragon. ‘Pa’ is a suffix used as a kind of identifier. ‘thongpa’ is a kind of Indian dish of curried paneer.
drug stong means 1000 thunders or 1000 dragons, depends on context.
I guess it depends on the weather
EMPTIFUL.
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Akir
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by Akir »

PadmaVonSamba wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 1:17 pmWell, it’s a bit of exotic fun. I knew a fellow who used to make up fake Tibetan names: Tungsten Gumdrop, Phuktup Tapedeck, and so on. That’s probably regarded as culturally insensitive today. But it was funny then. Some people only go by their Buddhist name after taking refuge. Others don’t. It’s not ‘important’.

In the Himalayas, one’s family name can reveal a lot about their family occupation or social class/caste status. By taking on dharma names, the Buddha’s followers let go of all past connections to social status. Everyone was equal in the sangha. Also, it symbolically meant leaving one’s old life behind and beginning a new life as a follower of the Buddha. So, there is an actual purpose to it.

‘DRUK’ means dragon. ‘Pa’ is a suffix used as a kind of identifier. ‘thongpa’ is a kind of Indian dish of curried paneer.

So, I guess ‘druktongpa’ would translate as ‘dragon cheese curry’.

It reminds me of a joke-story about a western Buddhist who prayed that he might enter a state of thukden when he died. This is a state of continued meditation, and the body remains warm and not rigid, no signs of deterioration for many days even though heart and breathing have stopped. but, his Tibetan wasn’t very good, and he actually prayed using the word thukpa, which means noodles. So, when he finally died, his body turned into noodles instead.
Thank you for clarifying about Tibetan names. :thanks:

Well, about the suffix "PA", I just wanted to know. That is, this suffix does not have any meaning, it is simply placed after the consonants, as I understand it.

Well, "dragon paneer and curry" is very very fun! :rolling:

The anecdote is good too, instructive and funny! :lol:
nyamlae
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by nyamlae »

Akir wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 3:29 pm Well, about the suffix "PA", I just wanted to know. That is, this suffix does not have any meaning, it is simply placed after the consonants, as I understand it.
Pa is sometimes part of the noun (e.g. thag pa "rope"), and sometimes creates new related nouns (e.g. zhing "field" > zhing pa "farmer"), and sometimes is a nominalizer (e.g. byed "to do" > byed pa "the thing that does"). (Also, sometimes it's just part of a verb or adjective.)

In words like "Gampopa", "Tsongkhapa", "Gelukpa", etc. it is the second meaning that applies. This usage is called the "owner sound" (བདག་སྒྲ་) because it is typically used to mark the owner of the original noun, such as a farmer being the owner of a field.
Last edited by nyamlae on Wed Jan 25, 2023 2:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Akir
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by Akir »

nyamlae wrote: Wed Jan 25, 2023 2:31 am
Akir wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 3:29 pm Well, about the suffix "PA", I just wanted to know. That is, this suffix does not have any meaning, it is simply placed after the consonants, as I understand it.
Pa is sometimes part of the noun (e.g. thag pa "rope"), and sometimes creates new related nouns (e.g. zhing "field" > zhing pa "farmer"), and sometimes is a nominalizer (e.g. byed "to do" > byed pa "the thing that does"). (Also, sometimes it's just part of a verb or adjective.)

In words like "Gampopa", "Tsongkhapa", "Gelukpa", etc. it is the second meaning that applies. This usage is called the "owner sound" (བདག་སྒྲ་) because it is typically used to mark the owner of the original noun, such as a farmer being the owner of a field.
Thanks for the detailed answer. :thanks:
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mnuuu
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Re: Meaning and translation "druktongpa" or "Drubthob"

Post by mnuuu »

PadmaVonSamba wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 1:17 pm
Akir wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 12:44 pm
...Phuktup Tapedeck...
This really had me in stiches! :rolling:
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