The Future of American Buddhism

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Daniel Arraes
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by Daniel Arraes »

Crazywisdom wrote: Sun Apr 24, 2022 5:59 pm I have a strong inclination Vajrayana is at its global peak. It's not growing. It's shrinking because there are few new generation of good teachers. There are very few really good lamas.
Global peak, maybe. But there is still a lot of unexplored potential outside of Asia.
KristenM
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by KristenM »

Malcolm wrote: Sun Apr 24, 2022 1:50 am
KristenM wrote: Sat Apr 23, 2022 1:52 am
Malcolm wrote: Fri Apr 22, 2022 6:20 pm

It was a different town when my Van Dyke ancestors settled it and the Hudson Valley.
So do you know Dick? :)
He’s from the Arizona Van Dykes, the son of my great grandfather’s brother.
That is amazing! Dick Van Dyke is a wonderful person, so it seems.
KristenM
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by KristenM »

Svalaksana wrote: Sun Apr 24, 2022 7:39 pm Lived in the UK, visited the USA, have family in Brazil and Africa, been to Mexico, and roughly other 30 countries. Don't know about you guys, but I wouldn't trade my tiny, discrete, mostly unknown strip of land with a mere 10 million inhabitants called Portugal, for anything else.

Not perfect by any means, but the fact that it is one of the safest countries in the world, has a national health service, plenty of sunlight and warmth, no terrorism, amazing food and wine, well... that just works for me.
I hear Portugal is very nice. For some reason (maybe you can give some insight) we have a lot of people from Portugal here in my part of California, many from the Azores Islands. We just had a new wine and tapas place open recently in my town by one of our Azores Island transplants.
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Svalaksana
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by Svalaksana »

KristenM wrote: Mon Apr 25, 2022 12:43 am
Svalaksana wrote: Sun Apr 24, 2022 7:39 pm Lived in the UK, visited the USA, have family in Brazil and Africa, been to Mexico, and roughly other 30 countries. Don't know about you guys, but I wouldn't trade my tiny, discrete, mostly unknown strip of land with a mere 10 million inhabitants called Portugal, for anything else.

Not perfect by any means, but the fact that it is one of the safest countries in the world, has a national health service, plenty of sunlight and warmth, no terrorism, amazing food and wine, well... that just works for me.
I hear Portugal is very nice. For some reason (maybe you can give some insight) we have a lot of people from Portugal here in my part of California, many from the Azores Islands. We just had a new wine and tapas place open recently in my town by one of our Azores Island transplants.
Hey Kristen, I'm not too sure about that but I can speculate that the fact there has been a USAF base on the Azores for around 80 years, has got to do something with the fact that so many moved to the US. Quality of living in the USA has been for the most part of history, substantially better than in Portugal, and especially in Azores, as the archipelago has remained somewhat less cosmopolitan and developed than the continent, which has instead resulted in better preserving its stunning natural beauty (been there last year for the 4th time and I absolutely fell in love with it). I'm guessing that having established a rapport with US pilots/soldiers (some Anglicized words became part of Azorean quotidian speech) and becoming acquainted with your culture might have played a part too.

I do know that many Portuguese (and particularly Azoreans) have moved to Massachusetts (there was a huge community in New Bedford) and New Jersey, but from what I could gather, California really takes the top spot currently, with roughly 330 000 Portuguese, Portuguese-Americans or descendants. I'm guessing they chose Cali because it might resemble the most the Portuguese climate (not the Azorean though, which is quite damp, humid and rainy, although Summers can get pleasant), with fine beaches, mostly warm weather? By the way, have you been to Portugal? I'm sure you would enjoy it if you're from Cali.

Only wish Portugal had a more developed embrace and awareness regarding Buddhism. It's a strongly Catholic country and therefore it can be somewhat conservative with deep-rooted traditions and roles in its own way, but that is steadily and organically changing. The Buddhist imprint is practically non-existent here, with only a handful of Buddhist associations (Songtsen House of Tibet, Lisbon's Zen Dojo, Guhya Mantrika Community, Portuguese Buddhist Association, and not much more).
Looking but not seeing - that's my eye.
Thinking but not minding - that's my mind.
Speaking but not expressing - that's my tongue.
Traveling but not going - that's my path.
KristenM
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by KristenM »

Svalaksana wrote: Tue Apr 26, 2022 9:36 am
KristenM wrote: Mon Apr 25, 2022 12:43 am
Svalaksana wrote: Sun Apr 24, 2022 7:39 pm Lived in the UK, visited the USA, have family in Brazil and Africa, been to Mexico, and roughly other 30 countries. Don't know about you guys, but I wouldn't trade my tiny, discrete, mostly unknown strip of land with a mere 10 million inhabitants called Portugal, for anything else.

Not perfect by any means, but the fact that it is one of the safest countries in the world, has a national health service, plenty of sunlight and warmth, no terrorism, amazing food and wine, well... that just works for me.
I hear Portugal is very nice. For some reason (maybe you can give some insight) we have a lot of people from Portugal here in my part of California, many from the Azores Islands. We just had a new wine and tapas place open recently in my town by one of our Azores Island transplants.
Hey Kristen, I'm not too sure about that but I can speculate that the fact there has been a USAF base on the Azores for around 80 years, has got to do something with the fact that so many moved to the US. Quality of living in the USA has been for the most part of history, substantially better than in Portugal, and especially in Azores, as the archipelago has remained somewhat less cosmopolitan and developed than the continent, which has instead resulted in better preserving its stunning natural beauty (been there last year for the 4th time and I absolutely fell in love with it). I'm guessing that having established a rapport with US pilots/soldiers (some Anglicized words became part of Azorean quotidian speech) and becoming acquainted with your culture might have played a part too.

I do know that many Portuguese (and particularly Azoreans) have moved to Massachusetts (there was a huge community in New Bedford) and New Jersey, but from what I could gather, California really takes the top spot currently, with roughly 330 000 Portuguese, Portuguese-Americans or descendants. I'm guessing they chose Cali because it might resemble the most the Portuguese climate (not the Azorean though, which is quite damp, humid and rainy, although Summers can get pleasant), with fine beaches, mostly warm weather? By the way, have you been to Portugal? I'm sure you would enjoy it if you're from Cali.

Only wish Portugal had a more developed embrace and awareness regarding Buddhism. It's a strongly Catholic country and therefore it can be somewhat conservative with deep-rooted traditions and roles in its own way, but that is steadily and organically changing. The Buddhist imprint is practically non-existent here, with only a handful of Buddhist associations (Songtsen House of Tibet, Lisbon's Zen Dojo, Guhya Mantrika Community, Portuguese Buddhist Association, and not much more).
Very insightful! We do have a lot of Portuguese and Basque people in California. We even have a lot of sheep farms/ranches and white Pyrenese dogs roaming about in the country here. I’ve been to Spain but never Portugal (yet). I’d love to check it out one day. I agree the geography in Spain is crazy how similar it is to California. When I was there, I thought about how much the conquistadors when they first visited California were likely in awe of the similarities in terrain. Warm weather, arid climate. Currently, it’s 25 degrees celsius at my home and we are growing tomatoes, potatoes, beans, lettuce, peppers etc. California is thought to have a large Buddhist community, which it does comparatively to other parts of the US. Still it’s not common enough for my likings. :)
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Svalaksana
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by Svalaksana »

KristenM wrote: Sat Apr 30, 2022 1:51 amVery insightful! We do have a lot of Portuguese and Basque people in California. We even have a lot of sheep farms/ranches and white Pyrenese dogs roaming about in the country here. I’ve been to Spain but never Portugal (yet). I’d love to check it out one day. I agree the geography in Spain is crazy how similar it is to California. When I was there, I thought about how much the conquistadors when they first visited California were likely in awe of the similarities in terrain. Warm weather, arid climate. Currently, it’s 25 degrees celsius at my home and we are growing tomatoes, potatoes, beans, lettuce, peppers etc. California is thought to have a large Buddhist community, which it does comparatively to other parts of the US. Still it’s not common enough for my likings. :)
Hey Kristen, just read an interesting article that says that more and more Californians are choosing Portugal (particularly Lisbon) as their new country, not to spend holidays, but to actually live in. Apparently most of them were tired of the hectic days, agitation, insecurity, high prices, being utterly fascinated at the tranquillity, safety, slow-paced living, friendliness, gastronomy, cheap cost of living, multicultural life and no radicalised political discourse. Biggest challenges apparently are the language (naturally impenetrable at first for an English speaker) and housing acquirement process (morose bureaucracy with lack of transparency is definitely an issue around here, some say even worst than in Cali). It seems in fact that search for villas and apartments by Americans has grown 11% and 32% respectively in the space of an year. Most also find similarities with the weather and beaches in California as well, so I guess that's where some of allure comes from, even the housing prices are not too dissimilar (now that sucks for us, obviously).

If you ever think of making a visit let me know, I'd be happy to show you around the place (don't worry I'm not a realtor and my bank account has 3 digits most of the time).
Looking but not seeing - that's my eye.
Thinking but not minding - that's my mind.
Speaking but not expressing - that's my tongue.
Traveling but not going - that's my path.
KristenM
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by KristenM »

Svalaksana wrote: Mon Jun 27, 2022 1:24 pm
KristenM wrote: Sat Apr 30, 2022 1:51 amVery insightful! We do have a lot of Portuguese and Basque people in California. We even have a lot of sheep farms/ranches and white Pyrenese dogs roaming about in the country here. I’ve been to Spain but never Portugal (yet). I’d love to check it out one day. I agree the geography in Spain is crazy how similar it is to California. When I was there, I thought about how much the conquistadors when they first visited California were likely in awe of the similarities in terrain. Warm weather, arid climate. Currently, it’s 25 degrees celsius at my home and we are growing tomatoes, potatoes, beans, lettuce, peppers etc. California is thought to have a large Buddhist community, which it does comparatively to other parts of the US. Still it’s not common enough for my likings. :)
Hey Kristen, just read an interesting article that says that more and more Californians are choosing Portugal (particularly Lisbon) as their new country, not to spend holidays, but to actually live in. Apparently most of them were tired of the hectic days, agitation, insecurity, high prices, being utterly fascinated at the tranquillity, safety, slow-paced living, friendliness, gastronomy, cheap cost of living, multicultural life and no radicalised political discourse. Biggest challenges apparently are the language (naturally impenetrable at first for an English speaker) and housing acquirement process (morose bureaucracy with lack of transparency is definitely an issue around here, some say even worst than in Cali). It seems in fact that search for villas and apartments by Americans has grown 11% and 32% respectively in the space of an year. Most also find similarities with the weather and beaches in California as well, so I guess that's where some of allure comes from, even the housing prices are not too dissimilar (now that sucks for us, obviously).

If you ever think of making a visit let me know, I'd be happy to show you around the place (don't worry I'm not a realtor and my bank account has 3 digits most of the time).
Yes, I’ve got a Facebook friend currently touring Portugal with her high school students from California. Her posts of the beaches in Lagos are breathtaking. I can see why people from other countries want to live there. All the reasons you mention. Housing prices are going up everywhere, unfortunately, and eventually there will be no more hidden gems. Hopefully that benefits the locals and not just the wealthy. Portugal is on my short list of places to go. And I’ll be in the Greek islands in 90 days, looking for Gregoris lol. Next trip to Europe maybe I should stop by Lisbon?

Oh, and actually if you were a realtor, that would be cool. From what I understand, buying property in the US is much easier for foreigners than in other countries. Everything has its pros and cons.
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conebeckham
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by conebeckham »

Malcolm wrote: Tue Apr 12, 2022 3:51 pm
conebeckham wrote: Tue Apr 12, 2022 3:31 pm
Malcolm wrote: Tue Apr 12, 2022 3:08 pm

Only for aristocrats. The common people just move in with each other. Maybe a party is thrown.
Malcolm, in my experience this is not the case. At least in Bhutan and Sikkim, puja happens. It may not be a “wedding ceremony,” but I have attended a few here where I am at present (Sikkim) over the years. And my own marriage was “consecrated,” sort of, via Konchok Chidu.
Ok.



Not usually a guy who wakes up zombie threads…but maybe some people may enjoy this video of my “wedding” in Sikkim…taken by my dear friend Kurt who has left us. It’s long and boring….you have been warned.

དམ་པའི་དོན་ནི་ཤེས་རབ་ཆེ་བ་དང་།
རྟོག་གེའི་ཡུལ་མིན་བླ་མའི་བྱིན་རླབས་དང་།
སྐལ་ལྡན་ལས་འཕྲོ་ཅན་གྱིས་རྟོགས་པ་སྟེ།
དེ་ནི་ཤེས་རབ་ལ་ནི་ལོ་རྟོག་སེལ།།


"Absolute Truth is not an object of analytical discourse or great discriminating wisdom,
It is realized through the blessing grace of the Guru and fortunate Karmic potential.
Like this, mistaken ideas of discriminating wisdom are clarified."
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philji
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by philji »

All of this talk about” American Buddhism”.. makes me think would Alaskan Buddhism be different to Tennessee Buddhism?
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Virgo
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

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Sādhaka wrote: Sat Mar 26, 2022 3:05 pm Unfortunately I think that I did use some of their NLP type tactics that they taught us to use.
When I was in sales I was frequently one of the highest selling salespeople in my district, usually at least in the top three. I never pressured a single customer to buy a single thing. I never reviewed my monthly sales numbers to see if I would make my quota. I frequently had no clue what my numbers were before the period closed.

I just tried to help each customer as best as I could and was honest with them about all the pros and cons of everything we sold. They trusted me. They bought things. They came back and asked to work with me again the next time. People also see me as very personable and I have a nice smile so that helped.

I never used NLP tactics, although people have tried to use them on me. I recognize it right away and usually know within a couple of minutes of meeting them if they are going to try to pull such things or not. Often I know before I ever speak to them, sometimes (almost always) I can see it from a half a mile away. I have an ability to read people without them even opening their mouth.

As to what American Buddhism will look like in the future, a dumpster fire comes to mind, and that is being very kind.

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Ayu
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Re: The Future of American Buddhism

Post by Ayu »

The OP of this topic was a recommendation for an event, 10 months ago.
If you'd like to discuss on the topic in general, please quote anything of this topic as you like (copy and paste of quote or link) and kindly start a new topic in an appropriate subforum. Thank you.
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