Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence

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Serenity509
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Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence

Post by Serenity509 »

Nietzsche's Eternal Recurrence
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EknD3KRtgDk" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Nietzsche's doctrine of eternal recurrence was partially influenced by Eastern philosophy and may have a basis in science.
Controversial theoretical physicist Peter Lynds suggested a model of eternal recurrence in a 2006 paper.[14] Lynds hypothesizes that if the universe undergoes a big crunch, the arrow of time may reverse. Others have approached the question of eternal recurrence from a physics perspective in different ways, including a hypothesis based on the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics.[15] Other cosmologists such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Max Tegmark consider the possibility that the known universe is just one of many in a multiverse, presenting the argument that existences identical to our own recur infinitely over infinite space.[16]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_re ... _cosmology" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
On a finite universe with no beginning or end
Peter Lynds
http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0612053" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

If you were destined to live your life an infinite number of times, how would you choose to live in the here and now? Eternal recurrence in this world might be a better motivator for right living than a belief in an afterlife such as a heaven to escape this world.
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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence

Post by PadmaVonSamba »

Serenity509 wrote: If you were destined to live your life an infinite number of times, how would you choose to live in the here and now? Eternal recurrence in this world might be a better motivator for right living than a belief in an afterlife such as a heaven to escape this world.
If I was were destined to live my life an infinite number of times, and that was just the way things were going to be and there was no way that would ever change, I would start eating more pizza. I love pizza. Then I would start doing all sorts of really self-destructive things that feel good.
EMPTIFUL.
An inward outlook develops outward insight.
Serenity509
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Re: Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence

Post by Serenity509 »

PadmaVonSamba wrote:
Serenity509 wrote: If you were destined to live your life an infinite number of times, how would you choose to live in the here and now? Eternal recurrence in this world might be a better motivator for right living than a belief in an afterlife such as a heaven to escape this world.
If I was were destined to live my life an infinite number of times, and that was just the way things were going to be and there was no way that would ever change, I would start eating more pizza. I love pizza. Then I would start doing all sorts of really self-destructive things that feel good.
You wouldn't choose to live the Dharma for the sake of living a better life?
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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence

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Serenity509 wrote: You wouldn't choose to live the Dharma for the sake of living a better life?
I chose to "live the dharma" (thank you, I like that phrase) for a lot of reasons, and I am probably alive today because of it, but my reason is not to lead a better life. Maybe to have a better approach to life, even when life sucks. To experience happiness without clinging to it, and to experience sadness without dwelling in it. I first started reading short zen writings when I was a kid. I have always felt connected to Buddhism, even when I was very young. Many things have brought me to it and it to me. But I don't consider it a self-help program. I practice in order to benefit others, and I do think it is possible to realize 'original enlightened mind' or buddha nature or 'end of samsara' whatever you want to call it. So, I am aiming for that as well.

Since 12-step programs have come up in this conversation, I'll tell you, I used to drink a lot every day and couldn't ever really stop, and 12 steps did nothing for me. I was basically drunk for about 10 years. Only when I took the 5 precepts (includes no alcohol) from my lama, was I immediately freed from even the desire to drink. That was about 20 years ago. I have no desire or any craving for it at all. It doesn't tempt me.
EMPTIFUL.
An inward outlook develops outward insight.
Serenity509
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Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:21 am
Location: United States

Re: Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence

Post by Serenity509 »

What do you think of eternal recurrence as a scientific hypotheses?

On a finite universe with no beginning or end
Peter Lynds
http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0612053" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

It's not a doctrine I'd believe because I'd want it to be true. The very idea of being trapped in the self-same life for eternity is terrifying. The point is that, if it were true, how would you choose to live?
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PadmaVonSamba
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Re: Nietzsche and Eternal Recurrence

Post by PadmaVonSamba »

From the buddhist view, we aren't even really trapped in the self-same life for even a moment. It just seems like we are, and we cling to that notion of continuity, of solidity even though we are constantly changing and the world around us is constantly changing, and because we experience a 'self-same life' that way, we get really disappointed when things change in a way that confront that feeling of a continuous "me".
EMPTIFUL.
An inward outlook develops outward insight.
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