Tenzin Palmo

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clyde
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Tenzin Palmo

Post by clyde »

Can anyone tell me the meaning of or anything about the three spots which I highlighted on the photo of Tenzin Palmo?
Tenzin Palmo.jpg
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“Enlightenment means to see what harm you are involved in and to renounce it.” David Brazier, The New Buddhism

“The most straightforward advice on awakening enlightened mind is this: practice not causing harm to anyone—yourself or others—and every day, do what you can to be helpful.” Pema Chodron, “What to Do When the Going Gets Rough”
pemachophel
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Re: Tenzin Palmo

Post by pemachophel »

They are from a Chinese Bodhisatva ordination ceremony where cones of incense are burned on the skin of the head, thus leaving life-time scars. It has to do with taking on the suffering of all sentient beings.
Pema Chophel པདྨ་ཆོས་འཕེལ
Malcolm
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Re: Tenzin Palmo

Post by Malcolm »

pemachophel wrote: Sun Oct 11, 2020 12:52 am They are from a Chinese Bodhisatva ordination ceremony where cones of incense are burned on the skin of the head, thus leaving life-time scars. It has to do with taking on the suffering of all sentient beings.
Actually, it’s from her bhikshuni ordination in the dharmaguptaka tradition. The incense scars descend from an imperial Chinese decree mandating that legitimately ordained sangha bear these marks as witness to their officially sanctioned ordination, as such, it’s a Chinese tradition found no where else.
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clyde
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Re: Tenzin Palmo

Post by clyde »

Thank you.
“Enlightenment means to see what harm you are involved in and to renounce it.” David Brazier, The New Buddhism

“The most straightforward advice on awakening enlightened mind is this: practice not causing harm to anyone—yourself or others—and every day, do what you can to be helpful.” Pema Chodron, “What to Do When the Going Gets Rough”
Bristollad
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Re: Tenzin Palmo

Post by Bristollad »

Malcolm wrote: Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:09 am
pemachophel wrote: Sun Oct 11, 2020 12:52 am They are from a Chinese Bodhisatva ordination ceremony where cones of incense are burned on the skin of the head, thus leaving life-time scars. It has to do with taking on the suffering of all sentient beings.
Actually, it’s from her bhikshuni ordination in the dharmaguptaka tradition. The incense scars descend from an imperial Chinese decree mandating that legitimately ordained sangha bear these marks as witness to their officially sanctioned ordination, as such, it’s a Chinese tradition found no where else.
IMHO you are both correct since in the Chinese tradition, bodhisattva vows are taken at the time of ordination.
jmlee369
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Re: Tenzin Palmo

Post by jmlee369 »

Malcolm wrote: Sun Oct 11, 2020 2:09 am
pemachophel wrote: Sun Oct 11, 2020 12:52 am They are from a Chinese Bodhisatva ordination ceremony where cones of incense are burned on the skin of the head, thus leaving life-time scars. It has to do with taking on the suffering of all sentient beings.
Actually, it’s from her bhikshuni ordination in the dharmaguptaka tradition. The incense scars descend from an imperial Chinese decree mandating that legitimately ordained sangha bear these marks as witness to their officially sanctioned ordination, as such, it’s a Chinese tradition found no where else.
As Bristollad said, the full Dharmaguptaka ordination is known as the Triple Platform ordination as they take the sramanera/ika (for a second time), bhikshu/ni, and bodhisattva precepts over three consecutive days. The incense burning is done as part of the bodhisattva precept ceremony.

They are following the practice of offering the body by burning which was taught in the Lotus and Shurangama sutras, so this practice is also widespread in Korea, even for taking lay precepts. The difference is that the marks are made on the arms, and the number of burns and degree of scarring differs between lay people and monastics.
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