The owl

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amanitamusc
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The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

Is there any mention in Tibetan Buddhism of the owl and what it symbolizes?
javier.espinoza.t
Posts: 2008
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:29 am

Re: The owl

Post by javier.espinoza.t »

From Robert Beer's Enciclopedia of Tibetan Simbols and Motifs, section of Domestic and Wild Animals,

p. 85
"The dark 'outcaste' and
predatory birds of the 'twilight realms', such as ravens,
crows, vultures, hawks, falcons and owls, form an extensive
retinue of aerial messengers or emissaries for the dark
wrathful forms of deities such as Mahakala."
and
The feathers of birds of prey, such as
the eagle, hawk, falcon, owl, or vulture, are specifically
employed in a multitude of tantric offerings; they also form
the steering feathers for divinatory arrows.
and p. 88
"...are the group of eight birds - vulture,
owl, raven, parrot, hawk, kite, myna bird, and swan - that
are trampled under the eight left feet of the deity Yamantaka."
Seem's like a being that nurtures from death, linked to wrathful deities as emissaries: apparently simbols a way, a mean, a media, to deliver a message.

Some owl materials can be gathered for divinatory purposes, as a Dadar construction, if you want a somehow more traditional implement.

For a specific i would look at Yamantaka deity depiction, but have to look for wich one corresponds.
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conebeckham
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Re: The owl

Post by conebeckham »

There are Owl-Headed "Tramens" in many sadhanas arising from Cakrasamvara cycles, and from other Tantras I believe, as well.
དམ་པའི་དོན་ནི་ཤེས་རབ་ཆེ་བ་དང་།
རྟོག་གེའི་ཡུལ་མིན་བླ་མའི་བྱིན་རླབས་དང་།
སྐལ་ལྡན་ལས་འཕྲོ་ཅན་གྱིས་རྟོགས་པ་སྟེ།
དེ་ནི་ཤེས་རབ་ལ་ནི་ལོ་རྟོག་སེལ།།


"Absolute Truth is not an object of analytical discourse or great discriminating wisdom,
It is realized through the blessing grace of the Guru and fortunate Karmic potential.
Like this, mistaken ideas of discriminating wisdom are clarified."
- (Kyabje Bokar Rinpoche, from his summary of "The Ocean of Definitive Meaning")
pemachophel
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Location: Lafayette, CO

Re: The owl

Post by pemachophel »

I've always heard that crows/ravens are emissaries of Mahakala.

Eagles and hawks are dra-la and commonly signify protection. Seeing them is typically considered good. Living in Colorado, we see a lot.

Never been told anything about owls, but I love them.

Once was asked to get vulture feathers for a puja. At the time, turkey buzzard feathers was as close as I could get. Now I keep a stash of vulture feathers in my puja ingredient box.
Pema Chophel པདྨ་ཆོས་འཕེལ
amanitamusc
Posts: 1802
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:32 am

Re: The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

Thank you all for your answers.
amanitamusc
Posts: 1802
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:32 am

Re: The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

javier.espinoza.t wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:07 pm From Robert Beer's Enciclopedia of Tibetan Simbols and Motifs, section of Domestic and Wild Animals,

p. 85
"The dark 'outcaste' and
predatory birds of the 'twilight realms', such as ravens,
crows, vultures, hawks, falcons and owls, form an extensive
retinue of aerial messengers or emissaries for the dark
wrathful forms of deities such as Mahakala."
and
The feathers of birds of prey, such as
the eagle, hawk, falcon, owl, or vulture, are specifically
employed in a multitude of tantric offerings; they also form
the steering feathers for divinatory arrows.
and p. 88
"...are the group of eight birds - vulture,
owl, raven, parrot, hawk, kite, myna bird, and swan - that
are trampled under the eight left feet of the deity Yamantaka."
Seem's like a being that nurtures from death, linked to wrathful deities as emissaries: apparently simbols a way, a mean, a media, to deliver a message.

Some owl materials can be gathered for divinatory purposes, as a Dadar construction, if you want a somehow more traditional implement.

For a specific i would look at Yamantaka deity depiction, but have to look for wich one corresponds.
Did Robert Beers give the sources for the quote's?
Thanks.
javier.espinoza.t
Posts: 2008
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:29 am

Re: The owl

Post by javier.espinoza.t »

amanitamusc wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:11 pm
javier.espinoza.t wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:07 pm From Robert Beer's Enciclopedia of Tibetan Simbols and Motifs, section of Domestic and Wild Animals,

p. 85
"The dark 'outcaste' and
predatory birds of the 'twilight realms', such as ravens,
crows, vultures, hawks, falcons and owls, form an extensive
retinue of aerial messengers or emissaries for the dark
wrathful forms of deities such as Mahakala."
and
The feathers of birds of prey, such as
the eagle, hawk, falcon, owl, or vulture, are specifically
employed in a multitude of tantric offerings; they also form
the steering feathers for divinatory arrows.
and p. 88
"...are the group of eight birds - vulture,
owl, raven, parrot, hawk, kite, myna bird, and swan - that
are trampled under the eight left feet of the deity Yamantaka."
Seem's like a being that nurtures from death, linked to wrathful deities as emissaries: apparently simbols a way, a mean, a media, to deliver a message.

Some owl materials can be gathered for divinatory purposes, as a Dadar construction, if you want a somehow more traditional implement.

For a specific i would look at Yamantaka deity depiction, but have to look for wich one corresponds.
Did Robert Beers give the sources for the quote's?
Thanks.
probably, i'll check and tell when i get at home.
amanitamusc
Posts: 1802
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:32 am

Re: The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

javier.espinoza.t wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:14 pm
amanitamusc wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:11 pm
javier.espinoza.t wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:07 pm From Robert Beer's Enciclopedia of Tibetan Simbols and Motifs, section of Domestic and Wild Animals,

p. 85



and



and p. 88



Seem's like a being that nurtures from death, linked to wrathful deities as emissaries: apparently simbols a way, a mean, a media, to deliver a message.

Some owl materials can be gathered for divinatory purposes, as a Dadar construction, if you want a somehow more traditional implement.

For a specific i would look at Yamantaka deity depiction, but have to look for wich one corresponds.
Did Robert Beers give the sources for the quote's?
Thanks.
probably, i'll check and tell when i get at home.
Thanks J.E.T for taking the time to find all of this information,very kind. :cheers:
javier.espinoza.t
Posts: 2008
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:29 am

Re: The owl

Post by javier.espinoza.t »

amanitamusc wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:19 pm
javier.espinoza.t wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:14 pm
amanitamusc wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:11 pm

Did Robert Beers give the sources for the quote's?
Thanks.
probably, i'll check and tell when i get at home.
Thanks J.E.T for taking the time to find all of this information,very kind. :cheers:
There is no specific citation, but it says in the Bibliography
The main reference material consulted in my writing of this text is drawn mainly from unpublished or restricted manuscripts, and from a compilation of tangential notes that I have accumulated over the years from a large variety of oral and descriptive sources. I have not listed the restricted manuscripts in this bibliography, but the translators and editors of these commentaries are listed in my acknowledgements.
So, counting what is listed as bibliography (parallel to the restricted materials), there are around 40 non-restricted texts.

Im afraid that the sources makes difficult to trace back the bibliography used on specific matters, like owl's simbolism.

BTW: i can post the list, there is no problem. i like group study :).
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cyril
Posts: 214
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2016 5:47 am

Re: The owl

Post by cyril »

pemachophel wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:01 pm I've always heard that crows/ravens are emissaries of Mahakala.

Eagles and hawks are dra-la and commonly signify protection. Seeing them is typically considered good. Living in Colorado, we see a lot.

Never been told anything about owls, but I love them.

Once was asked to get vulture feathers for a puja. At the time, turkey buzzard feathers was as close as I could get. Now I keep a stash of vulture feathers in my puja ingredient box.
It looks like owls too are emissaries of some Dharmapalas.
During Guru Rinpoche puja an Owl appear on the Golden throne of Pal Gyalwa Dokhampa Khamtrul Rinpoche and stand there for whole prayer ceremony, that was over 5 hours. It is to be said that an Owl is the messenger of the Jagmey. Jagmey is one of a protector of Pel Gyalwa Dokhampa Khamtrul Rinpoche.
https://www.facebook.com/Gyalwa.Dokhamp ... =3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/Gyalwa.Dokhamp ... =3&theater
"You have to make the good out of the bad because that is all you have got to make it out of."
- Robert Penn Warren -
amanitamusc
Posts: 1802
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:32 am

Re: The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

cyril wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 6:26 am
pemachophel wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:01 pm I've always heard that crows/ravens are emissaries of Mahakala.

Eagles and hawks are dra-la and commonly signify protection. Seeing them is typically considered good. Living in Colorado, we see a lot.

Never been told anything about owls, but I love them.

Once was asked to get vulture feathers for a puja. At the time, turkey buzzard feathers was as close as I could get. Now I keep a stash of vulture feathers in my puja ingredient box.
It looks like owls too are emissaries of some Dharmapalas.
During Guru Rinpoche puja an Owl appear on the Golden throne of Pal Gyalwa Dokhampa Khamtrul Rinpoche and stand there for whole prayer ceremony, that was over 5 hours. It is to be said that an Owl is the messenger of the Jagmey. Jagmey is one of a protector of Pel Gyalwa Dokhampa Khamtrul Rinpoche.
https://www.facebook.com/Gyalwa.Dokhamp ... =3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/Gyalwa.Dokhamp ... =3&theater
Here are some more pics.Thank you Cyril.
http://max-tibetanbuddhism.blogspot.com ... -guru.html
Last edited by amanitamusc on Sat Aug 11, 2018 8:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
amanitamusc
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Re: The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

javier.espinoza.t wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 12:32 am
amanitamusc wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:19 pm
javier.espinoza.t wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:14 pm

probably, i'll check and tell when i get at home.
Thanks J.E.T for taking the time to find all of this information,very kind. :cheers:
There is no specific citation, but it says in the Bibliography
The main reference material consulted in my writing of this text is drawn mainly from unpublished or restricted manuscripts, and from a compilation of tangential notes that I have accumulated over the years from a large variety of oral and descriptive sources. I have not listed the restricted manuscripts in this bibliography, but the translators and editors of these commentaries are listed in my acknowledgements.
So, counting what is listed as bibliography (parallel to the restricted materials), there are around 40 non-restricted texts.

Im afraid that the sources makes difficult to trace back the bibliography used on specific matters, like owl's simbolism.

BTW: i can post the list, there is no problem. i like group study :).
That would be great!This getting interesting.
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Mantrik
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Re: The owl

Post by Mantrik »

Internet searching doesn't reveal much - except of course the Aro Owl-headed Dakini stuff (think there was a thread here once).
Yes, Robert Beer is a great source. You can also contact him direct, Facebook etc.

Ravens, now if you want ravens........ lol :)
http://www.khyung.com ཁྲོཾ

Om Thathpurushaya Vidhmahe
Suvarna Pakshaya Dheemahe
Thanno Garuda Prachodayath

Micchāmi Dukkaḍaṃ (मिच्छामि दुक्कडम्)
jmlee369
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Re: The owl

Post by jmlee369 »

As far as I know, owls are consideraly extremely bad omens in Tibetan culture. I remember one of my teachers telling a story about a how a few mischievous young monks went out at night and made some owl hoots. The next day, the whole community was disturbed and spent quite a bit of time doing rituals to dispel obstacles.
Tenma
Posts: 1077
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Re: The owl

Post by Tenma »

pemachophel wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:01 pm I've always heard that crows/ravens are emissaries of Mahakala.

Eagles and hawks are dra-la and commonly signify protection. Seeing them is typically considered good. Living in Colorado, we see a lot.

Never been told anything about owls, but I love them.

Once was asked to get vulture feathers for a puja. At the time, turkey buzzard feathers was as close as I could get. Now I keep a stash of vulture feathers in my puja ingredient box.
Interesting how other cultures see the owl as a sign of wisdom or of a wisdom deity like Athena. Same with ravens(especially in America).
javier.espinoza.t
Posts: 2008
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:29 am

Re: The owl

Post by javier.espinoza.t »

amanitamusc wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 8:15 am
javier.espinoza.t wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 12:32 am
amanitamusc wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:19 pm
Thanks J.E.T for taking the time to find all of this information,very kind. :cheers:
There is no specific citation, but it says in the Bibliography
The main reference material consulted in my writing of this text is drawn mainly from unpublished or restricted manuscripts, and from a compilation of tangential notes that I have accumulated over the years from a large variety of oral and descriptive sources. I have not listed the restricted manuscripts in this bibliography, but the translators and editors of these commentaries are listed in my acknowledgements.
So, counting what is listed as bibliography (parallel to the restricted materials), there are around 40 non-restricted texts.

Im afraid that the sources makes difficult to trace back the bibliography used on specific matters, like owl's simbolism.

BTW: i can post the list, there is no problem. i like group study :).
That would be great!This getting interesting.
ok.
  • Anonymous, various authors articles in Cho Yang - The Voice of Tibetan Religion and Culture. No 2 (1987); No 3 (undated); No 6 (1994); No 7 (1996). New Delhi. Norbu- lingka Institute.
  • Auboyer, J. & Beguin, G. 1977. Dieux et Demons de I'Himalaya. Catalogue of Exhibition at the Grand Palais. Paris. Edi- tions des Musees Nationaux.
  • Bayer, S. 1978. The Cult of Tara - Magic and Ritual in Tibet. Berkley. University of California.
  • Brauen, M. 1997. The Mandala: Sacred Circle in Tibetan Bud- dhism. London. Serindia.
  • Boord, M. 1993. The Cult of the Deity Vajrakila in the Northern Treasures Tradition of Tibet. Tring. Institute of Buddhist Studies.
  • Chatterjee, G. 1996. Sacred Hindu Symbols. New Delhi. Abhinav.
  • Cozort, D. 1986. Highest Yoga Tantra. Ithaca. Snow Lion. Dagthon, J. G. Kalsang, J. & Choezom, T 1995. Tibetan As- tronomy and Astrology: A BriefIntroduction. Dharamsala: Astro. Dept. TM.A.I.
  • Dagyab, L.S. 1995. Buddhist Symbols in Tibetan Culture. Boston. Wisdom.
  • Dhargyey, Geshe N. 1985. Kalachakra Tantra. Dharamsala. L.TW.A.
  • Dorjee, P. 1996. Stupa and its Technology. Delhi. MotHal Banarsidass.
  • Dowson, J. 1982. A Classic Dictionary ofHindu Mythology and Religion. Calcutta. Rupa & Co.
  • Das, S. C. 1970. A Tibetan-English Dictionary. Delhi. Motilal Banarsidass.
  • Essen, G.w. and Thingo, T.T. 1987. Die Gotter des Himalaya. (2 vols.). Munchen. Prestel-Verlag.
  • Evans-Wentz, W. Y. 1969. Tibet's Great Yogi Milarepa. London. a.u.p.
  • Evans-Wentz, W. Y. 1969. The Tibetan Book ofthe Great Liberation. London. a.D.p.
  • Evans-Wentz, W. Y. 1968. The Tibetan Book of the Dead. London.a.U.P .
  • Feuerstein, G. 1990. Encyclopedic Dictionary of Yoga. London.
  • Gega Lama. 1983. Principles of Tibetan Art. (2 vols.). Darjeeling.
  • Gyatsho, T L. (trans. Jackson, D.P.)1979. Gateway to the Tem- ple. Kathmandu, Ratna Pustak Bhandar.
  • Gyatso, Geshe K. 1982. Clear Light ofBliss. London. Tharpa. Gyatso, Geshe K. 1991. Guide to Dakini Land. London. Tharpa.
  • Gyatso, Geshe K. 1994. Tantric Groimds and Paths. London. Tharpa.
  • Jackson, D. P. and Jackson. J.A. Illustrated by Robert Beer. 1998. Tibetan Thangka Painting: Methods & Materials. London. Serindia.
  • Jinpa, T & Dorje, G. (eds. Coleman, G). 1993· A Handbook of Tibetan Culture: Glossary ofKey Tibetan, Buddhist and Sanskrit Terms. London.
  • Rider Kakar, S. 1984. Shamans, Mystics and Doctors. Mandala Books/Unwin.
  • Karmay, S. G. 1988. Secret Visions of the Fifth Dalai Lama. London. Serindia.
  • Liebert, G. 1986. Iconographic Dictionary of the Indian Religions. Delhi. Sri Satguru.
  • Monier-Williams, Sir M. 1993. A Sanskrit-English Dictionary. Delhi. MotHal Banarsidass.
  • Nebesky-Wojkowitz, R. 1975. Oracles and Demons of Tibet. Graz. Akademische Druck-u. Verlagsanstalt.
  • Norbu, J. and Turnbull, C. N. 1969. Tibet: Its History, Religion and People. London.
  • Chatto and Windus. Parfionovitch, Y. Dorje, G. & Meyer, F. 1992. Tibetan MedicalPaintings. (2 vols). London. Serindia.
  • Sharpa Tulku & Perrott, M. 1987. A Manual of Ritual Fire Offerings. Dharamsala. L.TW.A.
  • Singh, S.D. 1989. Ancient Indian Warfare. Delhi. Motilal Banarsidass.
  • Snellgrove, D. L. 1980. The Hevajra Tantra - A Critical Study. (2 vols.). London. axford University Press.
  • Snellgrove, D.L. 1987. Indo-Tibetan Buddhism: Indian Buddhists and their Tibetan Successors. London.
  • Serindia Svoboda, R. E. 1986. Ag/lOra: At the Left Hand of God. Albuquerque. Brotherhood of Life.
  • Svoboda, R. E. 1993. Aghora II - Kundalini. Albuquerque. Brotherhood of Life.
  • Wade, D. 1982. Geometric Patterns and Borders. New York.
  • Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. Wayman, A. 1990. The Buddhist Tantras - Light on Indo-Tibetan Esotericism. Delhi. Motilal Banarsidass.
  • Williams, C. A. S. 1976. Outlines of Chinese Symbolism and Art Motives. New York. Dover. Unwin Hyman Ltd
amanitamusc
Posts: 1802
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:32 am

Re: The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

javier.espinoza.t wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 3:47 pm
amanitamusc wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 8:15 am
javier.espinoza.t wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 12:32 am

There is no specific citation, but it says in the Bibliography



So, counting what is listed as bibliography (parallel to the restricted materials), there are around 40 non-restricted texts.

Im afraid that the sources makes difficult to trace back the bibliography used on specific matters, like owl's simbolism.

BTW: i can post the list, there is no problem. i like group study :).
That would be great!This getting interesting.
ok.
  • Anonymous, various authors articles in Cho Yang - The Voice of Tibetan Religion and Culture. No 2 (1987); No 3 (undated); No 6 (1994); No 7 (1996). New Delhi. Norbu- lingka Institute.
  • Auboyer, J. & Beguin, G. 1977. Dieux et Demons de I'Himalaya. Catalogue of Exhibition at the Grand Palais. Paris. Edi- tions des Musees Nationaux.
  • Bayer, S. 1978. The Cult of Tara - Magic and Ritual in Tibet. Berkley. University of California.
  • Brauen, M. 1997. The Mandala: Sacred Circle in Tibetan Bud- dhism. London. Serindia.
  • Boord, M. 1993. The Cult of the Deity Vajrakila in the Northern Treasures Tradition of Tibet. Tring. Institute of Buddhist Studies.
  • Chatterjee, G. 1996. Sacred Hindu Symbols. New Delhi. Abhinav.
  • Cozort, D. 1986. Highest Yoga Tantra. Ithaca. Snow Lion. Dagthon, J. G. Kalsang, J. & Choezom, T 1995. Tibetan As- tronomy and Astrology: A BriefIntroduction. Dharamsala: Astro. Dept. TM.A.I.
  • Dagyab, L.S. 1995. Buddhist Symbols in Tibetan Culture. Boston. Wisdom.
  • Dhargyey, Geshe N. 1985. Kalachakra Tantra. Dharamsala. L.TW.A.
  • Dorjee, P. 1996. Stupa and its Technology. Delhi. MotHal Banarsidass.
  • Dowson, J. 1982. A Classic Dictionary ofHindu Mythology and Religion. Calcutta. Rupa & Co.
  • Das, S. C. 1970. A Tibetan-English Dictionary. Delhi. Motilal Banarsidass.
  • Essen, G.w. and Thingo, T.T. 1987. Die Gotter des Himalaya. (2 vols.). Munchen. Prestel-Verlag.
  • Evans-Wentz, W. Y. 1969. Tibet's Great Yogi Milarepa. London. a.u.p.
  • Evans-Wentz, W. Y. 1969. The Tibetan Book ofthe Great Liberation. London. a.D.p.
  • Evans-Wentz, W. Y. 1968. The Tibetan Book of the Dead. London.a.U.P .
  • Feuerstein, G. 1990. Encyclopedic Dictionary of Yoga. London.
  • Gega Lama. 1983. Principles of Tibetan Art. (2 vols.). Darjeeling.
  • Gyatsho, T L. (trans. Jackson, D.P.)1979. Gateway to the Tem- ple. Kathmandu, Ratna Pustak Bhandar.
  • Gyatso, Geshe K. 1982. Clear Light ofBliss. London. Tharpa. Gyatso, Geshe K. 1991. Guide to Dakini Land. London. Tharpa.
  • Gyatso, Geshe K. 1994. Tantric Groimds and Paths. London. Tharpa.
  • Jackson, D. P. and Jackson. J.A. Illustrated by Robert Beer. 1998. Tibetan Thangka Painting: Methods & Materials. London. Serindia.
  • Jinpa, T & Dorje, G. (eds. Coleman, G). 1993· A Handbook of Tibetan Culture: Glossary ofKey Tibetan, Buddhist and Sanskrit Terms. London.
  • Rider Kakar, S. 1984. Shamans, Mystics and Doctors. Mandala Books/Unwin.
  • Karmay, S. G. 1988. Secret Visions of the Fifth Dalai Lama. London. Serindia.
  • Liebert, G. 1986. Iconographic Dictionary of the Indian Religions. Delhi. Sri Satguru.
  • Monier-Williams, Sir M. 1993. A Sanskrit-English Dictionary. Delhi. MotHal Banarsidass.
  • Nebesky-Wojkowitz, R. 1975. Oracles and Demons of Tibet. Graz. Akademische Druck-u. Verlagsanstalt.
  • Norbu, J. and Turnbull, C. N. 1969. Tibet: Its History, Religion and People. London.
  • Chatto and Windus. Parfionovitch, Y. Dorje, G. & Meyer, F. 1992. Tibetan MedicalPaintings. (2 vols). London. Serindia.
  • Sharpa Tulku & Perrott, M. 1987. A Manual of Ritual Fire Offerings. Dharamsala. L.TW.A.
  • Singh, S.D. 1989. Ancient Indian Warfare. Delhi. Motilal Banarsidass.
  • Snellgrove, D. L. 1980. The Hevajra Tantra - A Critical Study. (2 vols.). London. axford University Press.
  • Snellgrove, D.L. 1987. Indo-Tibetan Buddhism: Indian Buddhists and their Tibetan Successors. London.
  • Serindia Svoboda, R. E. 1986. Ag/lOra: At the Left Hand of God. Albuquerque. Brotherhood of Life.
  • Svoboda, R. E. 1993. Aghora II - Kundalini. Albuquerque. Brotherhood of Life.
  • Wade, D. 1982. Geometric Patterns and Borders. New York.
  • Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. Wayman, A. 1990. The Buddhist Tantras - Light on Indo-Tibetan Esotericism. Delhi. Motilal Banarsidass.
  • Williams, C. A. S. 1976. Outlines of Chinese Symbolism and Art Motives. New York. Dover. Unwin Hyman Ltd
Thats great!Many thanks.
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Virgo
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Re: The owl

Post by Virgo »

jmlee369 wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 2:50 pm owl hoots.
In the study of Nimitta, which is part of Jyotish, we say that 1 hoot means death, 2 means success, 3 a new female member to the family, 4 signifies a disturbance, 5 hoots means travel, 6 guests are coming, 7 mental distress, 8 death, and 9 is auspicious.

Kevin...
amanitamusc
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Re: The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

Virgo wrote: Sun Aug 12, 2018 3:40 am
jmlee369 wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 2:50 pm owl hoots.
In the study of Nimitta, which is part of Jyotish, we say that 1 hoot means death, 2 means success, 3 a new female member to the family, 4 signifies a disturbance, 5 hoots means travel, 6 guests are coming, 7 mental distress, 8 death, and 9 is auspicious.

Kevin...
9 hoots would be quite a lung full! Thanks for the info Kevin. :twothumbsup:
amanitamusc
Posts: 1802
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:32 am

Re: The owl

Post by amanitamusc »

cyril wrote: Sat Aug 11, 2018 6:26 am
pemachophel wrote: Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:01 pm I've always heard that crows/ravens are emissaries of Mahakala.

Eagles and hawks are dra-la and commonly signify protection. Seeing them is typically considered good. Living in Colorado, we see a lot.

Never been told anything about owls, but I love them.

Once was asked to get vulture feathers for a puja. At the time, turkey buzzard feathers was as close as I could get. Now I keep a stash of vulture feathers in my puja ingredient box.
It looks like owls too are emissaries of some Dharmapalas.
During Guru Rinpoche puja an Owl appear on the Golden throne of Pal Gyalwa Dokhampa Khamtrul Rinpoche and stand there for whole prayer ceremony, that was over 5 hours. It is to be said that an Owl is the messenger of the Jagmey. Jagmey is one of a protector of Pel Gyalwa Dokhampa Khamtrul Rinpoche.
https://www.facebook.com/Gyalwa.Dokhamp ... =3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/Gyalwa.Dokhamp ... =3&theater
It is to be said that an Owl is the messenger of the Jagmey.
There is even less information online for Jagmey. Anyone now about Jagmey?
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