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Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Tue Sep 22, 2020 11:23 pm
by Danny
Any on here?

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Tue Sep 22, 2020 11:31 pm
by KathyLauren
Heck, yeah!

Image

Om mani padme hum
Kathy

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Tue Sep 22, 2020 11:36 pm
by Danny
KathyLauren wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 11:31 pm Heck, yeah!

Image

Om mani padme hum
Kathy
Awesome! Kathy you got dark skies?

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Tue Sep 22, 2020 11:52 pm
by KathyLauren
Danny wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 11:36 pm Awesome! Kathy you got dark skies?
Pretty dark. Bortle 2 on a good night. More often Bortle 3.

Om mani padme hum
Kathy

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 1:07 am
by Danny
KathyLauren wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 11:52 pm
Danny wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 11:36 pm Awesome! Kathy you got dark skies?
Pretty dark. Bortle 2 on a good night. More often Bortle 3.

Om mani padme hum
Kathy
I got to travel to get dark skies, I can photograph the usual M’s and planetary stuff, Wide field constellation stuff, but those deep NGC’s and Milky Way, I have to jump in car and drive 5 hours.
Btw, I was doing some fun research on the SDSS website, all their survey data is available to the public, you can spend hours on there digging through spectrums and deep redshift galaxies, you can even flag the objects of interest and submit them. I have an out of date Norton’s 2000, but it’s still good for the RA and Dec to input on that site for objects of interest.

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 3:50 pm
by Queequeg
Someone just gave us a telescope, and I've been meaning to get it out. My son has been falling into astronomy youtube holes lately and is asking a lot of questions - mostly about the sun eventually exploding - but a lot of more immediate questions, too. I'd like to get him looking through the telescope to fill out his experience and make the connection between what he is learning and the world around him.

Any suggestions for newbies on getting started?

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 3:54 pm
by Caoimhghín
Queequeg wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 3:50 pm Someone just gave us a telescope, and I've been meaning to get it out. My son has been falling into astronomy youtube holes lately and is asking a lot of questions - mostly about the sun eventually exploding - but a lot of more immediate questions, too. I'd like to get him looking through the telescope to fill out his experience and make the connection between what he is learning and the world around him.

Any suggestions for newbies on getting started?
Teach him how, as the universe expands, eventually the rate of the universe's expansion will outpace the speed of light, and light from other nearby stars will cease to reach us and there will only be inky black in the night sky. I can't imagine that possibly going wrong.

:sage:

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 4:09 pm
by Queequeg
Caoimhghín wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 3:54 pm
Queequeg wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 3:50 pm Someone just gave us a telescope, and I've been meaning to get it out. My son has been falling into astronomy youtube holes lately and is asking a lot of questions - mostly about the sun eventually exploding - but a lot of more immediate questions, too. I'd like to get him looking through the telescope to fill out his experience and make the connection between what he is learning and the world around him.

Any suggestions for newbies on getting started?
Teach him how, as the universe expands, eventually the rate of the universe's expansion will outpace the speed of light, and light from other nearby stars will cease to reach us and there will only be inky black in the night sky. I can't imagine that possibly going wrong.

:sage:
LOL.

Yeah, this freaked ME out.


Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 10:50 pm
by Danny
I would start small, the planets and the moon,
Leave the sun out, under no circumstances,
NEVER EVER, not even messing around, look directly or through optical equipment, observe ,look at, or entertain the Idea of looking at the sun, will absolutely cause permanent life long eye damage or blindness
.
Get a general understanding of the big constellations, where’s Orion what time of year is it visible? What’s the ecliptic? Why the planets and moon follow that path from east to west etc. Then build from there. Most of those colorful images of nebulas and so on, like what you see in this thread, those objects look nothing like those through telescopes or binoculars. Those are images taken with long exposures with filters and enhanced in software. The thrill of finding a faint greenish smoke ring M57 ring nebula in the constellation of Lyra in the summer, will leave a lasting impression, then you’ll want to bag all the Messier catalogue deep sky objects, all 100+ of them. Then it becomes like a treasure hunt.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messier_object

Most people don’t realize you can see the 4 major moons of Jupiter with just a pair of binoculars,
and over a few hours see the orbits change.

Sky & telescope is a monthly online magazine that provides monthly star charts, positions of the planets and other interesting sky highlights and latest news etc.

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2020 6:32 pm
by Queequeg
:twothumbsup:

Thanks!

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 6:12 pm
by tingdzin
We just had a series of amazing astronomical spectacles visible with the naked eye and probably fantastic with a telescope, including a new comet and a (semi-regular) meteor shower. If you start looking on the Net, there are sites that will notify you when this stuff is coming, and IMO it's great for kids to be interested in it.

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Fri Oct 02, 2020 2:44 am
by Danny
tingdzin wrote: Thu Oct 01, 2020 6:12 pm We just had a series of amazing astronomical spectacles visible with the naked eye and probably fantastic with a telescope, including a new comet and a (semi-regular) meteor shower. If you start looking on the Net, there are sites that will notify you when this stuff is coming, and IMO it's great for kids to be interested in it.
Yes, people think you need big telescopes to sky watch, but honestly there’s so much naked eye observing one can do, planet conjunctions are fantastic to observe. Really can give you a sense of perspective of the solar system etc.

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Thu Oct 08, 2020 8:00 pm
by tingdzin
There's another meteor shower going on this week.

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Thu Oct 08, 2020 11:23 pm
by Danny
Yeah the Draconid meteor shower, a medium or moderate shower, best seen early hours of the night/morning. Draco is a constellation near Polaris (North Star), in Ursa Minor, in the northern hemisphere. So very easy to find. :)
Check for last quarter moon setting times, so shower doesn’t get washed out by moon light.

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Fri Oct 09, 2020 5:33 pm
by DharmaN00b
Danny wrote: Wed Sep 23, 2020 10:50 pm

Most people don’t realize you can see the 4 major moons of Jupiter with just a pair of binoculars,
and over a few hours see the orbits change.

Sky & telescope is a monthly online magazine that provides monthly star charts, positions of the planets and other interesting sky highlights and latest news etc.
New enthusiast here/ ready t0 start scanning! :thanks: :heart:

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Sat Oct 10, 2020 1:38 pm
by Danny
A nice pair of 10x50 magnification,
BAK 4 prisim, multi coated surface optics, with a tripod adapter, binoculars is the way to start, is a great jump off point to begin with. Use a tripod for steady viewing. It keeps the cost down, without shelling out for expensive gear. Light weight, portable and can go anywhere, and you’ll spend more time looking than setting up.
Enjoy.

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:07 am
by Danny
Planet Mars is in opposition for the next few days, that means it’s at its best that it’s been in past 2 years. Look towards the east, can’t miss it.
Or won’t be this close to earth again until 2035.
Mars is notorious for observation. I’ve seen the large surface mare’s and polar ice caps with a 4.5” newtonian under pretty poor seeing, it’s a stretch, but doable. Larger scopes, no problems.



Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:12 am
by tobes
Danny wrote: Sat Oct 10, 2020 1:38 pm A nice pair of 10x50 magnification,
BAK 4 prisim, multi coated surface optics, with a tripod adapter, binoculars is the way to start, is a great jump off point to begin with. Use a tripod for steady viewing. It keeps the cost down, without shelling out for expensive gear. Light weight, portable and can go anywhere, and you’ll spend more time looking than setting up.
Enjoy.
Yep, plus a map!

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:14 am
by Danny
tobes wrote: Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:12 am
Danny wrote: Sat Oct 10, 2020 1:38 pm A nice pair of 10x50 magnification,
BAK 4 prisim, multi coated surface optics, with a tripod adapter, binoculars is the way to start, is a great jump off point to begin with. Use a tripod for steady viewing. It keeps the cost down, without shelling out for expensive gear. Light weight, portable and can go anywhere, and you’ll spend more time looking than setting up.
Enjoy.
Yep, plus a map!
Yeah lots of easy apps for phones these days. I learnt my way around the old fashioned way.
A Norton’s 2000 and a red bulb flashlight.
Of course there’s the “go to” computer stuff on telescopes as well.

Re: Backyard Astronomers?

Posted: Thu Oct 15, 2020 12:52 pm
by KathyLauren
This is my best Mars for this year. Seeing was poor, so the focus is off.
212552_RGBaligned.jpg
212552_RGBaligned.jpg (10.32 KiB) Viewed 420 times