Mahayana/Vajrayana Links and Resources

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Dronma
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Re: Dzogchen Resources

Post by Dronma »

Mindrolling in India:
http://mindrolling.org/

HE Jetsün Khandro Rinpoche:
http://mjkr.org/

Palyul tradition:
http://www.palyul.org/
The sound of s i l e n c e.....
oldbob
Posts: 731
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 8:19 am

Re: Dzogchen Resources

Post by oldbob »

Bio and Picture of Ven. Kyabje Chatral Sangye Dorje Rinpoche | T. khro rgyal rdo rje | (1913 - )
http://www.shabkar.org/teachers/tibetan ... npoche.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Dharma Center - Adzom Rinpoche - Nyingmapa - Crestone CO
http://www.whitejewelmountain.org/index.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Dharma Center - Dawn Mountain - Anne Klein, Harvey Aronson, Houston TX
http://www.dawnmountain.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Dharma Center - Drikung Dzogchen Community - Bristol VT
DDCV
http://ddcv.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Teacher - Ven. Tulku Thondup
http://www.tulkuthondup.com/index.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Mahasiddha Nyingmapa center - Ven. Dodrup Chen Rinpoche - E. Hawley MA
http://www.mahasiddha.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Dharma Center - in India
http://www.zangdokpalri.org/index.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Tara Mandala - Lama Tsultrim Allione
http://taramandala.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Bhusuku
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Re: Dzogchen Resources

Post by Bhusuku »

Chokling Jigmed Palden Rinpoche
http://www.tharlam-dronme.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Yeshe Khorlo (Gangteng Tulku Rinpoche)
http://yeshekhorlo.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Shenten Dargye Ling
http://shenten.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche
http://tergar.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Wangdor Rimpoche
http://www.customjuju.com/wangdorrimpoche/index.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Lopon Ugyen Rinpoche
http://www.ngakde.eu" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Rangjung Yeshe Gomde
http://www.gomde.de/eng" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Khordong (Chhimed Rigdzin/Tulku Ugyen Chencho)
http://www.khordong.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Nyingma Centers Europe
http://nyingma-centers.blogspot.co.at" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
oldbob
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Re: Dzogchen Resources

Post by oldbob »

Teacher: Lama Yeshe - Virgil Antonio

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sssrigpaw ... nyakaruna/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://candle4tibet.ning.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=472879" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Mr. G
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Location: Spaceship Earth

Re: Dzogchen Resources

Post by Mr. G »

Tara wrote:Please keep this "Dzogchen Resources" thread to links (in a list which makes it easy to use) with, for example, the name of the teacher beside a link as can be seen in the OP. Apologies for not making this clear before.

Regards,
  • How foolish you are,
    grasping the letter of the text and ignoring its intention!
    - Vasubandhu
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kalden yungdrung
Posts: 4606
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Re: Dzogchen Resources

Post by kalden yungdrung »

Tashi delek,

After some reconciderations due to some usefull opinions from other members here aboard, did i change up my mind.
Bon Dzogchen does form a part of the general Dzogchen Teachings worldwide, therefore it should also be announced here. :D

Mutsog marro
KY



H.H. Menri Trizin 33rd, Tenpai Nyima Rinpoche
http://www.bonfoundation.org/index.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

H.E. Yongdzin Lopön Tenzin Namdak Rinpoche
http://www.triten.org/TR/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://shenten.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

His Eminence Menri Lopon Trinley Rinpoche
http://www.khyungdzongwl.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Geshe Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche:
https://www.ligmincha.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.ligminchatexas.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Retreat in the USA: http://www.chammaling.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.ligmincha.nl/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.bongaruda.de/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.garudamexico.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://a.bongaruda.pl/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.garudaswitzerland.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Geshe Yong Dong
http://www.sherabchammaling.com/index.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Tempa Dukte Lama
http://www.olmoling.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Chongtrul Rinpoche
http://bonshenling.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

H.E. the 7th Kundröl Rinpoche
http://www.zamongyal.com/index.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Geshe Chaphur Rinpoche
http://gyalshen.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Geshe Nyima Dakpa Rinpoche
http://jungdrungbon.net/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

John Reynolds / Vajranatha
http://www.vajranatha.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

John Vincent Belezza
http://www.asianart.com/articles/vestiges/index.html#1" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Lama Khemsar Rinpoche
http://www.yungdrungbon.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://togmisherab.artalama.net.ru/en/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Foundation Yungdrung Rignga Ling / Bon temple in the Netherlands
Location:
http://maps.google.nl/maps?ie=UTF-8&hl=nl&tab=wl" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Open Google maps - Type: Kerkrade, yungdrung
The best meditation is no meditation
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Thomas Amundsen
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Re: Book Recommendations on Bön/Dzogchen

Post by Thomas Amundsen »

zamongyal wrote:Quote BhusukuRe: Book Recommendations on Bön/Dzogchen
by Bhusuku » Wed May 23, 2012 11:33 pm

A Collection of Studies on the Tibetan Bon Tradition (PDF)


Thanks for this! An excellent resource to share with beginners and good for me too. What is the copyright on it? I looked online briefly to see if it is sold somewhere??? perhaps you could post a link?
Just finished reading this. It was great! Thanks!
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Sara H
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Location: On Hiatus from Dharmawheel.

Re: Zen Buddhism Resources

Post by Sara H »

Shasta Abbey (Soto Zen) offers almost all of their books for free now as a pdf. download.

You can still get hardcopy's available though online stores through Throssel Hole Abbey and various online retailers.

Scriptures are also available for free as are Dharma Talks.

For Publications and Books:
http://www.shastaabbey.org/teachings-publications.html

For Scriptures:
http://www.shastaabbey.org/teachings-scriptures.html

For Ceremonies:
http://www.shastaabbey.org/teachings-ceremonies.html

For Dharma Talks by Rev. Master Jiyu-Kennet:
http://www.shastaabbey.org/teachings-RMjiyu.html

For Dharma Talks by Rev. Master Dazui MacPhillamy:
http://www.shastaabbey.org/teachings-RMdaizui.html

For a top-level general index of Teachings including talks by RM Meian Elbert, RM Daishin Yalon, and other Senior Teachers, past teachers, archives and others:
http://www.shastaabbey.org/teachings.html

In Gasshō,

Sara H
"Life is full of suffering. AND Life is full of the Eternal
IT IS OUR CHOICE
We can stand in our shadow, and wallow in the darkness,
OR
We can turn around.
It is OUR choice." -Rev. Basil Singer

" ...out of fear, even the good harm one another. " -Rev. Dazui MacPhillamy
bloxgros
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Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 12:10 am

Re: Tibetan Buddhism Resources

Post by bloxgros »

Hi here is first pages from new sit about history of Tibetan Buddhism http://www.buddhism-of-tibet.webuda.com ... hism-tibet
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kalden yungdrung
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Re: Book Recommendations on Bön/Dzogchen

Post by kalden yungdrung »

Tashi delek,

Just bought this book:
The philosophical View
of the Great Perfection
in the Tibetan Bon Religion

Written by Donatelli Rossi Ph.D in History of Religious and Tibetology from the University of Oslo, Norway. She currently lives in Portland, Oregon, where she continuous her research on the Great Perfection in the Bon Religion.
I saw here one time in Menri Monastery Dolanji.

Its a great book which explains realy the point of view in Bon Dzogchen.
Many great persons did made assistence to compile this book.

Some of them are:
The Menri Ponlop Trinley Nyima Rinpoche
Dan Martin
Prof. Samten G. Karmay
Prof. Per Kvaerne
Prof. Katsumi Mimaki
Prof. Anne-Marie Blondeau
Prof. Jens Braarvig

Snowlion
ISBN 1-55939-129-4
Printed in Canada
21.95 $ in the USA
14.95 Pound Sterling in the UK


Mutsug Marro
KY
The best meditation is no meditation
ijika
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Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2012 10:11 pm

Re: Japanese Vajrayana: Shingon 101

Post by ijika »

Unfortunately, a lot of the links are now non-existent or out-of-date. The shingon.org web site apparently hasn't been updated in three years; the costs quoted there for ordination in Japan seem to be over ten years old. I guess I should update my website (link removed).

If you're interested in the 88-temple pilgrimage on Shikoku, I've got a fair bit of information and photos on that...
username
Posts: 759
Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2011 8:23 pm

Re: Tibetan Buddhism Resources

Post by username »

Image
Over 90 excellent Audio Teachings, some also as Video, by rigzin Trungpa Lingpa, the 11th, on Dharma, natrue of mind, etc. whereby some high teachings are also openly hidden & given in simple language plus some Q/A sessions. Click on the left column for each session's talks:

http://www.chronicleproject.com/CTRlibr ... brary.html
Dzogchen masters I know say: 1)Buddhist religion essence is Dzogchen 2)Religions are positive by intent/fruit 3)Any method's OK unless: breaking Dzogchen vows, mixed as syncretic (Milanese Soup) 4)Don't join mandalas of opponents of Dalai Lama/Padmasambhava: False Deity inventors by encouraging victims 5)Don't debate Ati with others 6)Don't discuss Ati practices online 7) A master told his old disciple: no one's to discuss his teaching with some others on a former forum nor mention him. Publicity's OK, questions are asked from masters/set teachers in person/email/non-public forums~Best wishes
Huseng
Former staff member
Posts: 6336
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Online Philosophy & Buddhology Resources

Post by Huseng »

Let's list some good free online resources for the study of general philosophy and Asian philosophies including Buddhism.


Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:

http://plato.stanford.edu" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy:

http://www.iep.utm.edu/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Journal of Buddhist Philosophy (forthcoming):

http://www.buddhistphilosophy.net/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The International Research Institute for Advanced Buddhology:

http://iriab.soka.ac.jp/orc/english.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Publications:

http://iriab.soka.ac.jp/orc/Publication ... _BPPB.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Chung-Hwa Buddhist Journal:

http://www.chibs.edu.tw/eng_html/index_eng00_04.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Iranica Online:

http://www.iranicaonline.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Digital Library and Museum of Buddhist Studies (DLMBS)

http://buddhism.lib.ntu.edu.tw/BDLM/en/index.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Asia Major 3rd Edition:

http://www.ihp.sinica.edu.tw/book_page/book4/3.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Digital Archive Projects DDM:

http://www.ddbc.edu.tw/en/digital_archi ... jects.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Sara H
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Location: On Hiatus from Dharmawheel.

Re: Buddhism Resources

Post by Sara H »

Shasta Abbey and the Order of Buddhist Contemplatives offers Dharma talks, (including transcribed versions for the hearing impaired)
Scriptures, publications and full published books for free from their website.

Download, read, or listen to here:
http://www.shastaabbey.org/teachings-publications.html

Of particular note is a new, full translation of the Shobogenzo by Dogen, and The Roar of the Tigress Volume's I and II, which are made up of some of the Oral Teachings of Rev. Master Jiyu-Kennett.

http://www.shastaabbey.org/teachings-publications.html

There's a lot here, from things for the beginner, to practitioners going deeper.

Shasta Abbey and the OBC are a lineage of Soto Zen Buddhism.

In Gassho,
Sara H
"Life is full of suffering. AND Life is full of the Eternal
IT IS OUR CHOICE
We can stand in our shadow, and wallow in the darkness,
OR
We can turn around.
It is OUR choice." -Rev. Basil Singer

" ...out of fear, even the good harm one another. " -Rev. Dazui MacPhillamy
Huseng
Former staff member
Posts: 6336
Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2010 3:19 pm

Re: Online Philosophy & Buddhology Resources

Post by Huseng »

Here is another good free resource.

Complete list of digitalized articles at the Digital Library & Museum of Buddhist Studies:

http://buddhism.lib.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT/cf_eng.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Yudron
Posts: 1087
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2012 8:55 pm

The Nyingma

Post by Yudron »

Non-institutional Nyingma Life Today
attributes, characteristics, elements, customs


Over the years I think I have observed a few features that are characteristic of the Nyingma that I am familiar with as a U.S. based practitioner. I thought eventually it may be useful for telling people n the future about the Nyingma lineage, so I wrote a few things down as notes. The usual academic descriptions are not necessarily comprehensible by a new-comer.

You can give feedback now. I’m most interested in the observations of people whose lamas are strictly from a Nyingma perspective, not so much Sa-Nying or Ka-Nying, but of course others will have useful things to say.

I have almost no knowledge of the largest religious institutions in the Nyingma today; the six “mother monasteries,” (Mindrolling, Dorje Drak, Palyul, Shechen, Kathog, and Dzogchen) and their satellites and colleges (shedras). Each seems to have twin institutions now – a monastery that has been rebuilt in Tibet, and a new monastery in India or Nepal. It would be great if people affiliated with them would post.

So here goes, a few observations I have as a contemporary practitioner:

Guru Rinpoche is the towering central figure of the Nyingma tradition today. He is the main archetype of the guiding principle. Practice is generally based on treasure literature ascribed to him. Recitation of 10,000,000 or more Guru Rinpoche mantras is a lifetime is a very common practice, and in Nyingma families this is often completed after ngondro completion in adolescence. Since Guru Rinpoche is an emanation of Amitabha and Chenresi, large accumulations of his mantra (there are many actually) may possibly be even more common than the mani! I’ve heard there is even a word for new teeth that grow in for elderly people who recite 100,000,000 Guru Rinpoche mantras.

The three roots: The Nyingma iteration of the Three Roots are Guru, Yidam, and Dakini. These are three categories of creation and completion practice. The Lama practices (usually Guru Rinpoche or Longchenpa) are the root of blessing. The Yidam practice (often Vajrakilaya, Hayagriva or Zhitro—yes, Zhitro)
is the source of siddhis. The Dakini practice (there are many terma dakini traditions, such as Yeshe Tsogyal, Vajravarahi, Throma, Tara, Kurukhulla, Sarasvati and so on) is the source of enlightened activity. Other schools may refer to the three roots and mean something else. Strictly speaking each of us would practice all three kinds of practice each day, but then at other times lamas will say everything can be accomplished in one deity practice, or they may say that all practices are accomplished when one can abide in rigpa continuously.

Non-centralized authority – There is no central authority for the Nyingmas. Lamas are accountable to their own specific teachers and the senior holders of their specific terma or monastic lineage. An old lama, who everyone respects, is selected to hold the title of head of the Nyingma lineage to represent the school for the purposes of the Tibetan government in exile. This lama does not oversee or control all the Nyingma lamas.

It is generally believed that the best lama for individual to follow is a Dzogchen master (your personal Guru Rinpoche) who is a holder of one or more terma lineages. This often appears as a Tibetan or Bhutanese man who is both the son of a well-respected lama, and who is often the recognized tulku of a previous great lama. Inside Tibet, the most well known non-institutional teachers of today might be leaders of religious encampments (chö gar), or mountain hermitages (ri trö), or a monk founding a smaller monastery. In Europe, North America and South America such lamas may have centers or retreat centers, or dwell incognito. There may also be broadly respected Rinpoches who are the senior teachers of many other lamas. They will have a satellite group of lamas and the children of lamas around them. How things will look as the tradition gets assimilated into non-Himalayan communities, and Tibetans continue to intermarry with Westerners, is uncertain. There are many western lamas and teachers who have been asked to teach by their lama; notably, many women, but few have any institutional power. Two notable exceptions to this are Mindroling Khandro Rinpoche and Chagdud Khandro.

Tulku and Khandros -- With a few exceptions, all Nyingma lines of tulkus originate with Guru Rinpoche and the famed 25 disciples. [The most obvious inherent contradiction in this – that Dzogchen is famed for “enlightenment in one lifetime,” and yet no completely new lines of tulkus have started in well over a thousand years-- is not addressed.] While women are highly regarded, at this point in time, most of those recognized as tulkus seem to be male, the sons of lamas, and ethnically at least partially Tibetan.

At the same time, it is not uncommon in the Nyingma tradition in Asia to find women formally recognized as nirmanakaya dakinis. These girls and women are seen as a source of blessing, healing, advice– but rarely occupy formal teaching positions or give empowerment. Also, female Buddhist oracles channeling worldly goddesses are part of Tibetan culture in general.

Practice --The view of the Great Perfection is often introduced early, and applied to one’s practice from ngondro on up. From reading scholarly works, one may get the impression that each of the nine-yanas is practiced according to it’s own view. This is not the approach taken by current great masters—everything is approached with the view of the great perfection. Ngondro is generally the foundation of one’s practice, instead of shamatha-vipassyna practice, or the serious practice of outer tantras. Sutric principles are introduced within the context of one’s ngondro practice. It is common for a practitioner to continue reciting ngondro and the mahayoga practices of the three roots—guru, yidam, and dakini—daily throughout life, even later when their emphasis is on completion stage practices. A lama may take an individualized approach to the sequence of the practices a student does, rather than having a strictly uniform practice path for everyone. Tsog is strongly emphasized at all levels of practice, and offered at least twice a month (on Guru Rinpoche and Dakini Day), often six times a month, and some practice communities or families do it together every day. Tsok is the main practice one does in a group. In the Nyingma, it is the glue that binds a community together, reinforcing pure view. It is usually not a super-secret practice restricted to serious practitioners of the specific deity the specific liturgy is based on, as it is in other traditions.

The week-long elaborate Great Accomplishment (drupchen) group practice is revered, and many practice communities offer it once a year or more if they can do it. In general, there seems to be an emphasis on merit producing work – such as cleaning, pushing a wheelbarrow, tsog set up and break down, tormas, dancing, costumes, art, ritual, and text production, for the accumulation of merit.

The particular liturgies with which one undertakes the practices are not handed down from teacher to disciple going back to the time of Buddhist India, as they may be in other lineages. They are usually the revelations of enlightened Tibetan awareness holders that usually hearken back to Guru Rinpoche. As I understand it, the terma deity practices usually relate to actual Indian tantric practices, especially the eight main yidam practices (Ka gye, most notably Vajrakilaya and Hayagriva/Varahi), the Guhyagharba (the antecedent for the Zhitro practices) and the Vidyadhara Guru (the antecedent for Guru Rinpoche sadhanas).

The entire scope of one’s life is experienced as Wisdom Deity and Mandala -- as a representation of rigpa and its radiance. This wheel principle can be expressed in many different ways, such as your lama as Guru Rinpoche encircled by his disciples, or Vajrakilaya (or Hayagriva) at the center, and the concentric circles of his emanational army on the battle field defeating the maras, and so on, ad infinitum. Your life is then viewed though this lens. The lived-through experience of this is a gateway to ongoing recognition of one’s own self-sprung wisdom.

Practice valued above theory – Someone who sincerely and humbly practices Dharma every day, whether illiterate or highly educated, is respected for it. While Dharma education is valued, the idea of institutions churning out intellectuals who merely study Buddhism, and don’t practice it, is abhorred.

Faith and devotion – Vigorous respect and devotion of your lama, whether he or she is famous or not, coupled with pure view of both the lama and one’s vajra sisters and brothers, is viewed as main key to enlightenment.

Secrecy – In general, one is advised to not talk about one’s practice, or one’s accomplishment. Talk is thought to quickly and thoroughly undermine progress on the path, even wiping out one’s accomplishment. The higher the level of one’s practice, the more secret it becomes, in proportion to how precious it is. For example, one might talk about ngondro with others, if it is beneficial, but it is considered a major fault to publicly broadcast that one is an anu or ati practitioner, or disclose these practices to others. The exception is when one lama asks one to teach because one is a master of anuyoga or atiyoga.

On the other hand, non-institutional Nyingma lamas often freely give access to “advanced” mahayoga retreats, teachings and practices that would be reserved for a select group of people – for example those who complete three-year retreat – in other lineages.

Most commonly, the transmission of the highest teachings, Dzogchen proper, takes place behind closed doors and pre-requisites or personal approval of one’s readiness by the Dzogchen master is required for participation. At any time one can be introduced to the nature of one’s mind by the master.

Apolitocalness - Involvement in “politics” is not viewed as a good for practice, and most Nyingmapa lamas and students avoid this. Being political is thought to sully one. To Tibetan Nyingmapas the word seems to mean one is too close to the government-in-exile in Dharamsala, or to the Communist party in China, or to quixotic activism for the reinstatement of Tibetan nationhood, or to fights for power between monasteries or powerful high lamas. In addition, it is generally advised to avoid befriending powerful people in general, including politicians and high lamas (those with a lot of institutional power), even if they are good, because it is easy to become trapped. On the other hand, what westerners would call political, causes such as opposing the death penalty, environmental destruction, war or killing, may be encouraged, as long as they are not approached with a dualistic mindset.

Joy and relaxation– Joy and relaxation are said to benefit all levels of practice. Joyful group activities that are fun for many people, such as preparing art and offerings for a drupchen, cham dancing, and singing, are emphasized – and generally grueling, grim, driven approaches to practice are de-emphasized.

Inseparability from family life – Dharma is incorporated in family life, and men, women, and children are all regarded as having the potential for enlightenment. Enlightenment is not reserved for Lamas, monks or nuns, or yogins in retreat. Folks in Nyingma families have a sense of dignity and confidence in this.

Locations – Significant Nyingma practice communities are in Bhutan, Nepal [Pharping, Bouda, and the border areas with Tibetan China], Orissa, India, Sikkim, and throughout the Tibetan regions in the Chinese domain, especially Kham, Golok and Amdo [Sichuan and Qinghai provinces, China]. In Europe, the greatest Nyingma presence is in France. In the U.S., California, Oregon, and New York state have multiple Nyingma centers. Brazil has several growing centers.

Lama – The lama title, or authority to teach, is not usually bestowed based on completion of any particular program, such as a formal three year three month retreat, but based on one’s lama’s view of your capacity to benefit beings through teaching. Thus, one person may go through three consecutive three year retreats and not be asked to teach, and another may study, serve, and practice independently with a lama over a period of many years and be asked to teach. On one extreme, in Buddhist communities in the Himalayas it may be that people will call someone lama out of respect because their qualities are obvious, even though that person’s lama has not asked them to teach. On the other extreme, some lamas will never give the lama title to anyone, because it seems to be an obstacle to practitioners’ progress on the path, and there is a greater need for fully enlightened Dzogchen masters than titular lamas.
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lobster
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Re: The Nyingma

Post by lobster »

How Wonderful :twothumbsup:

Many thanks :applause:
Guru Rinpoche is my favourite practice :thumbsup:
Suppose I better be inspired and do some . . . :meditate:
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Thomas Amundsen
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Location: Helena, MT
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Re: The Nyingma

Post by Thomas Amundsen »

Thanks!
deff
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Joined: Thu Mar 04, 2010 8:23 pm

Re: The Nyingma

Post by deff »

thanks, Yudron :smile:
Sherlock
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Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 3:14 pm

Re: The Nyingma

Post by Sherlock »

AFAIK Kathog has quite little presence in the exile community. Kathog lamas who escape into exile join one of the branches of the other six monasteries like Palyul. In Sichuan and some Chinese speaking areas on the other hand they are quite active.
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