to read or know or learn before ordaining

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to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby mettafou » Sun May 16, 2010 5:15 am

what do we need to read or know or learn before ordaining at a therevada monastery?
Last edited by mettafou on Sun May 16, 2010 5:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Dexing » Sun May 16, 2010 5:31 am

The first thing might be the Theravada discussion board; http://dhammawheel.com/

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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby mettafou » Sun May 16, 2010 5:50 am

thanks, there's some really useful information there. i'm thinking outside of therevada context.
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Huifeng » Sun May 16, 2010 12:48 pm

mettafou wrote:what do we need to read or know or learn before ordaining at a therevada monastery?


mettafou wrote:thanks, there's some really useful information there. i'm thinking outside of therevada context.


About "ordaining at a Theravada monastery" but "outside of Theravada context"?

Sorry, I'm not following what you are actually asking here.
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Indrajala » Sun May 16, 2010 12:49 pm

It depends on where you ordain and with who.

I mean Japanese ordination is entirely different from say a Chinese one.

The later often requires you to be a novice for a certain period of time. In the old days, as my friend explained to me, you had to spend five years attached to your Shifu (master) serving him before you could fully ordain. That isn't so common now from the sounds of it, but when he did it it was looking after all the needs of the Shifu including nursing him when he was ill and making porridge every single morning.

In Tibetan traditions I think a mandatory three year treat is what you need before you're a fully recognized bhiksu(ni) (correct me if I'm wrong here!).

Again, you need to be specific about which tradition and where and under whom.
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Will » Sun May 16, 2010 3:42 pm

mettafou wrote:what do we need to read or know or learn before ordaining at a therevada monastery?


"Ordain" means to become a monk or bhikkhu in the Theravadin lineage. With a Mahayana sponsor you would become a Mahayana bhikshu, and "ordained" at a Mahayana monastery.

Is one of these choices what you want?

Or do you just wish to take refuge in the Triple Jewel and become a Buddhist?
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Astus » Sun May 16, 2010 8:00 pm

Monastic Training System of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism a summary.

"In the Jogye Order, a future member of the community first seeks out a teacher at a temple, has his head shaved or his hair cut very short, and serves as an aspirant apprentice for a period of at least five months. Once the aspirant is accepted, there is a ceremony of the taking of the novice precepts, or training rules. These consist of refining the ethical standards of the individual. After completing four years of basic training in living in the monastery and attending training college where the aspirant learns philosophy and other necessary subjects, candidates then take prescribed examinations and if successful, they then take the full precepts, becoming a monk, bhikkhu, or nun, bhikkhuni.
Once ordained, a new monk will participate in all the daily activities of the temple, including chanting, maintenance, meditation retreats, text study, and so on. Some may be involved in administrative affairs and the teaching of the laity."

Renunciation and ordination
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Does marvelous nature and spirit
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Mind is this mind carefree;
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby mettafou » Sun May 16, 2010 10:02 pm

thanks for your replies.
About "ordaining at a Theravada monastery" but "outside of Theravada context"?

Sorry, I'm not following what you are actually asking here.


e.g. what outside the pali canon is worth studying? what aspects, skills, etc beyond that foundation work well for someone considering ordination within therevada?
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Will » Sun May 16, 2010 11:23 pm

mettafou,

Ask a Theravadin bhikku.
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Huifeng » Mon May 17, 2010 4:02 am

mettafou wrote:thanks for your replies.
About "ordaining at a Theravada monastery" but "outside of Theravada context"?

Sorry, I'm not following what you are actually asking here.


e.g. what outside the pali canon is worth studying? what aspects, skills, etc beyond that foundation work well for someone considering ordination within therevada?


As Will says. If it is the Theravada tradition into which you wish to ordain, then you should be looking into Theravada sources. This is not just the Pali canon alone, but these sources should definitely be from the Theravada tradition. You could follow the link earlier to www.dhammawheel.com or www.accesstoinsight.org and so forth. If that is the tradition you want to ordain into, then for now, I'd recommend that you don't need to spend any time looking into the Mahayana (including www.dharmawheel.org in general).
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby mettafou » Mon May 17, 2010 7:05 am

thanks everyone. i've done studies in therevada. i'm interested in taking in non-theravada sutras, in case they are one day useful, etc. and no longer available... or to have a greater understanding of buddhism as a whole...
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Astus » Mon May 17, 2010 7:09 am

You can study Mahayana sutras in a Theravada monastery on your own, if you have internet for instance, or a good library there.
"There is no such thing as the real mind. Ridding yourself of delusion: that's the real mind."
(Sheng-yen: Getting the Buddha Mind, p 73)

“Don’t rashly seek the true Buddha;
True Buddha can’t be found.
Does marvelous nature and spirit
Need tempering or refinement?
Mind is this mind carefree;
This face, the face at birth."

(Nanyue Mingzan: Enjoying the Way, tr. Jeff Shore; T51n2076, p461b24-26)
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Re: to read or know or learn before ordaining

Postby Huifeng » Mon May 17, 2010 10:38 am

Astus wrote:You can study Mahayana sutras in a Theravada monastery on your own, if you have internet for instance, or a good library there.


I guess one could. But I would definitely recommend clearing this with the abbot first. :smile:
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