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Patience in the Eightfold Path - Dhamma Wheel

Patience in the Eightfold Path

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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Nibbida
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Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Nibbida » Thu Nov 04, 2010 7:42 pm

I know patience is one of the 10 paramis. As far as I know, the paramis are not classified as a group into the Eightfold Path, but just as a matter of organization, where would patience fit in?

The closest I can think is that both generosity (dana) and patience (khanti) are a form of compassion, so that would be "Right Intentions."

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
:anjali:

Individual
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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Individual » Thu Nov 04, 2010 7:47 pm

All eight involve patience: Patience with others when they make it difficult to practice and patience with yourself when you screw up. :)

No need to use Pali etymology to make things more confusing than they need to be. :)
The best things in life aren't things.


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Kim OHara
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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Kim OHara » Thu Nov 04, 2010 9:51 pm

... and no need to arrange all the lists in neatly nested boxes.
The lists - paramis, Brahmaviharas, factors leading to enlightenment, etc - are mainly mnemonic aids for people living in cultures where reading and writing were rare. They don't necessarily form a neat hierarchy of concepts.
:namaste:
Kim

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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Individual » Thu Nov 04, 2010 10:04 pm

The best things in life aren't things.


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Nibbida
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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Nibbida » Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:35 am

Maybe it would make more sense if I explain my purpose. I'm writing something about the Buddhism, using the Eightfold Path as a convenient way to organize it, especially since it's what all Buddhist schools agree on. So rather than leave out stuff on patience, I'd like to include it somewhere, preferably where it would make most sense.

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Guy
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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Guy » Fri Nov 05, 2010 12:42 am

Right Effort would be where I'd put it. The effort to cultivate and maintain patience is Right Effort. The effort to abandon and avoid impatience is Right Effort.
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm

Individual
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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Individual » Fri Nov 05, 2010 2:00 am

The best things in life aren't things.


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Nibbida
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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Nibbida » Fri Nov 05, 2010 3:49 pm


Individual
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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby Individual » Fri Nov 05, 2010 4:57 pm

The best things in life aren't things.


rowyourboat
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Re: Patience in the Eightfold Path

Postby rowyourboat » Fri Nov 05, 2010 7:52 pm

I would place in Right effort- this is because right effort has 4 parts
1) Protecting what is wholesome- requires not being agitated, for example, to protect the samadhi you have developed
2) developing what is wholesome- developing equanimity in light of stressful situations have a part in the development of patience, without being agitated where agitation might otherwise arise
3) avoiding what is unwholesome in the future- being patient stops defilements from arising
4) getting rid of what is unwholesome- when agitated, brining patience into mind as a counter-measure

Hope that helps,

with metta

Matheesha (RYB)
With Metta

Karuna
Mudita
& Upekkha


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