How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Wesley1982 » Mon Apr 23, 2012 12:55 am

How to cultivate a Bodhi mind? . .
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby kirtu » Mon Apr 23, 2012 1:11 am

Wesley1982 wrote:How to cultivate a Bodhi mind? . .


Pursue enlightenment for the sake of all sentient beings, in order to lead them all without exception to enlightenment.

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"Only you can make your mind beautiful."
HH Chetsang Rinpoche
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Jinzang » Mon Apr 23, 2012 1:53 am

Think that there is not a single being who has not shown you kindness at some point in the infinity of time. Think on them with love, and feel compassion, as most are suffering terribly. Vow to repay their kindness by removing their suffering. And, realizing that the cause of suffering is the afflictive emotions, which are rooted in the dualism of self and other, vow to attain enlightenment, which transcends this dualism, so that you can lead them to the same understanding.
Lamrim, lojong, and mahamudra are the unmistaken path.
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby plwk » Mon Apr 23, 2012 2:25 am

Are you asking for the Pure Land perspective on this or general Buddhism's perspective?
Here's from the Pure Land perspective
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby sinweiy » Mon Apr 23, 2012 2:27 am

i ever posted this in esangha. i was thinking of the mind of leaving/renunciation "chu li xin"(mind of leaving "samsara") vs bodhi-mind.

it states that generating the mind of leaving/renunciation is good for beginners(hinayanist) and should be treated as a foundation. generally, the primary reason for generating the mind of renunciation is hoping to "escape" the suffering of samsara.

however we need to have the right idea of renunciation. some people only wish to go to enjoy in heavenly realms in their next life. or to get away from the 3 evil realms. such mind of 'leaving' is not enough.

after knowing that we cannot find true happiness in the 6 samsaric realms, we generated the mind of renunciation.

from mahayana's point of view, we go further into generating the bodhi mind which is the essence of Buddhahood.

there are 2 kind of bodhi-mind. relative bodhi is to attain Buddhahood in order to help sentient beings and the absolute bodhi that involve the true understanding of sunyata/emptiness.
in order to have a right view in our practice, both relative bodhi and absolute bodhi should be Equally important.



Bodhicitta may also be defined as the union of compassion and wisdom.
they are often referred to as:
• Relative bodhicitta, which refers to a state of mind in which the practitioner works for the good of all beings as if it were his own.
• Absolute, or ultimate, bodhicitta, which refers to the wisdom of shunyata (śunyatā, a Sanskrit term often translated as "emptiness", though the alternatives "openness" or "spaciousness" probably convey the idea better to Westerners).[4] The concept of śunyatā in Buddhist thought does not refer to nothingness, but to freedom from attachments (particularly attachment to the idea of a static or essential self) and from fixed ideas about the world and how it should be. The classic text on śunyatā is the Prajñāpāramitā Hṛdaya Sūtra, a discourse of the Buddha commonly referred to as the "Heart Sūtra."

So, the term bodhicitta in its most complete sense would combine both:
• the arising of spontaneous and limitless compassion for all sentient beings, and
• the falling away of the attachment to the illusion of an inherently existent self.

Some bodhicitta practices emphasize the absolute (e.g. vipaśyanā); others emphasize the relative (e.g. metta), but both aspects are seen in all Mahāyāna practice as essential to enlightenment, especially in the Tibetan practices of tonglen and lojong. Without the absolute, the relative can degenerate into pity and sentimentality, whereas the absolute without the relative can lead to nihilism and lack of desire to engage other sentient beings for their benefit.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodhicitta
_/\_
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"Enlightenment is to turn around and see MY own mistake, Other's mistake is also my mistake. Others are right even if they are wrong. i'm wrong even if i'm right. " - Master Chin Kung
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby sinweiy » Mon Apr 23, 2012 2:33 am

Ten Doubts about Pure Land
By Tien Tai Patriarch Chih I
Translated by Master Thich Thien Tam

Question 1

Great Compassion is the life calling of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. Thus, those who have developed the Bodhi Mind, wishing to rescue and ferry other sentient beings across, should simply vow to be reborn in the Triple Realm, among the five turbidities and the three evil paths. Why should we abandon sentient beings to lead a selfish life of tranquillity? Is this not a lack of compassion, a preoccupation with egoistic needs, contrary to the path of enlightenment?

Answer

There are two types of Bodhisattvas. The first type are those who have followed the Bodhisattva path for a long time and attained the Tolerance of Non-Birth (insight into the non-origination of phenomena). This reproach applies to them.

The second type are Bodhisattvas who have not attained the Tolerance of Non-Birth, as well as ordinary beings who have just developed the Bodhi Mind. If they aspire to perfect that Tolerance and enter the evil life of the Triple Realm to save sentient beings, they should remain in constant proximity to the Buddhas. As stated in the Perfection of Wisdom Treatise:

"It is unwise for human beings who are still bound by all kinds of afflictions, even if they possess a great compassionate mind, to seek a premature rebirth in this evil realm to rescue sentient beings.

"Why is this so? It is because in this evil, defiled world, afflictions are powerful and widespread. Those who lack the power of Tolerance (of Non-Birth) are bound to be swayed by the external circumstances. They then become slaves to form and sound, fame and fortune, with the resulting karma of greed, anger and delusion. Once this occurs, they cannot even save themselves, much less others!

"If, for example, they are born in the human realm, in this evil environment full of non-believers and externalists, it is difficult to encounter genuine teachers. Therefore, it is not easy to hear the Buddhadharma nor to achieve the goals of the sages.

"Of those who planted the seeds of generosity, morality and blessings in previous lives and are thus now enjoying power and fame, how many are not infaturated with a life of wealth and honor, wallowing in endless greed and lust?

"Therefore, even when they are counselled by enlightened teachers, they do not believe them nor act accordingly. Moreover, to satisfy their passions, they take adavantage of their existing power and influence, creating a great deal of bad karma. Thus, when their present life comes to an end, they descend upon the three evil paths for countless eons. After that, they are reborn as humans of low social and economic status. If they do not then meet good spiritual advisors, they will continue to be deluded, creating more bad karma and descending once again into the lower realms. From time immemorial, sentient beings caught in the cycle of Birth and Death have been in this predicament. This is called the 'Difficult Path of Practice'."

The Vimalakirti Sutra also states,

"If you cannot even cure your own illness, how can you cure the illness of others?"

The Perfection of Wisdom Treatise further states:

"Take the case of two persons, each of whom watches a relative drowning in the river. The first person, acting on impulse, hastily jumps into the water. However, because he lacks the necessary skills, in the end, both of them drown. The second person, more intelligent and resourceful, hurries off to fetch a boat and sails to the rescue. Thus, both persons escape drowning.

"Newly aspiring Bodhisattvas are like the first individual who still lacks the power of Tolerance (of Non-Rebirth) and cannot save sentient beings. Only those Bodhisatttvas who remain close to the Buddhas and attain that Tolerance can substitute for the Buddhas and ferry countless sentient beings across, just like the person who has the boat."

The Perfection of Wisdom Treatise goes on to state:

"This is not unlike a young child who should not leave his mother, lest he fall into a well, drown in the river or die of starvation; or a young bird whose wings are not fully developed. It must bide its time, hopping from branch to branch, until it can fly afar, leisurely and unimpeded.

"Ordinary persons who lack the Tolerence of Non-Birth should limit themselves to Buddha Recitation, to achieve one-pointedness of Mind. Once that goal is reached, at the time of death, they will certainly be reborn in the Pure Land. Having seen Amitabha Buddha and reached the Tolerance of Non-Birth, they can steer the boat of that Tolerance into the sea of Birth and Death, to ferry sentient beings across and accomplish countless Buddha deeds at will."

For these reasons, compassionate practitioners who wish to teach and convert sentient beings in hell, or enter the sea of Birth and Death, should bear in mind the causes and conditions for rebirth in the Pure Land. This is referred to as the 'Easy Path of Practice' in the Commentary on the Ten Stages of the Bodhisattvas.
_/\_
Amituofo!

"Enlightenment is to turn around and see MY own mistake, Other's mistake is also my mistake. Others are right even if they are wrong. i'm wrong even if i'm right. " - Master Chin Kung
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Will » Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:42 am

Wesley1982 wrote:How to cultivate a Bodhi mind? . .


A traditional text on how to develop the resolve for Bodhi, also known as bodhicitta or bodhi mind:

http://www.cttbusa.org/bodhi_resolve/contents.asp
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Huifeng » Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:51 am

Wesley1982 wrote:How to cultivate a Bodhi mind? . .


Reflect that all living beings are suffering, and that the only way to effectively help them is to become a fully awakened buddha and guide them from your realization.

~~ Huifeng
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Will » Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:31 pm

A passage from the Avatamsaka Sutra, chapter 9, giving the attitude which cultivates the bodhi mind:

Buddha having cultivated extensive difficult practices, diligently working day and night, having crossed the hard to cross, with a lion's roar, teaching all beings—this is our practice.
Sentient beings whirl in the sea of craving and greed, shrouded by the web of ignorance, terribly oppressed; the Most Benevolent bravely cuts it all away, we vow to also do so—this is our practice.
Worldlings have no control, attached to sense desires; falsely discriminating, they suffer myriad pains. Practicing the Buddhas' teaching, always control the mind, vowing to cross over this—this is our practice.
Sentient beings, attached to self, enter birth and death; looking for a limit to this, none can be found. Serving all the enlightened to obtain the wondrous teaching, explain it to others—this is our practice.
Living beings are helpless, wrapped up in sickness, forever sunk in evil ways, producing the three poisons, the fierce flames of a great fire always burning them; with a pure heart to rescue them, this is our practice.
Beings are confused, having lost the right path; always going the wrong way, they enter the house of darkness. For their sake lighting the lamp of truth, to be a light forever—this is our practice.
Sentient beings bob and sink in the ocean of existences; their troubles are boundless, they have no place to rest. To make for them an ark of truth to ferry them over—this is our practice.
Sentient beings are ignorant and don't see the fundamental; confused, foolish, crazed, in the midst of danger and difficulty. Buddhas pity them and set up a bridge of teaching with right awareness, to let them cross over — this is our practice.
Seeing beings on perilous paths, oppressed by the pains of age, illness, and death, develop unlimited skill in means and pledge to save them all—this is our practice.
Hearing the truth, believing without doubt, comprehending essential emptiness without shock or fear, appearing in all realms in appropriate forms, teach all the deluded—this is our practice.
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Wesley1982 » Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:36 pm

plwk wrote:Are you asking for the Pure Land perspective on this or general Buddhism's perspective?
Here's from the Pure Land perspective


Both Pure Land and general Buddhism. Had some thoughts on the study of the mind and self.
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby steveb1 » Mon Apr 23, 2012 8:51 pm

Just my 2 cents, but Jodo Shinshu, as I understand it, says that Amida does all salvific work for us.

Therefore, we are not to worry about cultivating a Bodhi mind or any other kind of self-powered goal, no matter how holy or lofty.

Shin people - please correct me if I am wrong on this, but is it not central to Shin that it is Amida alone who grants us things like salvation, Shinjin and/or Bodhi Mind?
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Nighthawk » Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:56 pm

Steve, I am no expert but from my learning I understand it the same way as well.

The practice of Listening Deeply is required though to receive Shinjin. That can be done by reading the direct words of Masters Shinran and Rennyo.
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby steveb1 » Tue Apr 24, 2012 1:30 am

Nighthawk wrote:Steve, I am no expert but from my learning I understand it the same way as well.

The practice of Listening Deeply is required though to receive Shinjin. That can be done by reading the direct words of Masters Shinran and Rennyo.


Nighthawk, thank you for the reply. Yes, in addition to the nembutsu, deep listening is the "practice" that illustrates our "entwinement" with Amida. I'm glad you share this understanding. It's not that I don't want a Bodhi MInd - it's just that Amida would be the source of cultivating that Mind in me - my self-power can't do that :)
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby sinweiy » Tue Apr 24, 2012 2:06 am

yes,
it's not easy to understand Bodhicitta from other master's POV, but however Patriarch Ou-i's Commentary on the Amitabha Sutra stated a much simplier way of understanding Bodhicitta in PL term.
it's very clear cut, saying that "Wholehearted sincerity in reborning in Western Pureland is in inself the unsurpassed Bodhi mind." "真心、真诚心求生西方极乐世界,这个心就是无上菩提心."
Patriach Yin Guang also agreed and praise Patriarch Ou-i.
yes, because one's deep faith in Amitabha and to reborn in PL is in itself the highest bodhi mind.
we see many illiterate Granny and Grandpa of the older generation in Asia, HONESTLY, Wholeheartedly practicing Buddha Recitation without knowing what's Bodhicitta. They are very much in a letting go state. hence they are reborn in PL as recorded.

moreover in the,
Hymn of Faith

Among the conducts of all worlds,

This faith alone is the one most rare and precious wish-fulfilling pearl.

Profoundly we believe:

Trusting the Buddhas and the Buddhas' Dharma,

Treading the Bodhi-Path,

Forever followed by all true disciples.

And to the Great Enlightenment

Our thoughts are joyfully inclined:

The Bodhisattvas with this deep heart of faith produce the Bodhi-Mind!

http://online.sfsu.edu/~rone/Buddhism/B ... t/BDF.html
(CITY OF 10,000 BUDDHAS RECITATION HANDBOOK 235)

ref: http://www.sinc.sunysb.edu/Clubs/buddhi ... ntent.html
_/\_
Amituofo!

"Enlightenment is to turn around and see MY own mistake, Other's mistake is also my mistake. Others are right even if they are wrong. i'm wrong even if i'm right. " - Master Chin Kung
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby steveb1 » Tue Apr 24, 2012 2:19 am

sinweiy wrote, "The Bodhisattvas with this deep heart of faith produce the Bodhi-Mind!"

A lovely expression of Other Power - thanks for sharing :)
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Nighthawk » Tue Apr 24, 2012 6:57 am

Good to see some common ground between Chinese Pure Land and Jodo Shinshu.
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby LastLegend » Tue Apr 24, 2012 7:34 am

Study Dharma and practice Dharma.
NAMO AMITABHA
NAM MO A DI DA PHAT (VIETNAMESE)
NAMO AMITUOFO (CHINESE)
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Huifeng » Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:00 am

Hmmm, while there is course a lot of common ground between the Chinese and Japanese Pure Land traditions, I have very seldom if ever encountered full "other power" expressions in Chinese Pure Land practice. I have only ever encountered the idea that we still need to very sincerely bring about that faith and determination for rebirth in Sukhavati, and without doing that, we just are not going to get there. While Amitabha has made his vows, we still have to make vows to be reborn in Sukhavati.

~~ Huifeng
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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Zenshin 善心 » Tue Apr 24, 2012 4:01 pm

A paramount theme in the thought of Shinran is his profound concern that our individual salvation not be considered separately from the aspiration to realize the salvation of all beings. Consonant with Amida's Primal Vow, where the Tathagata declares that he will not enter Nirvana unless he can similarly emancipate all suffering creatures, Shinran exhorts a comparable attitude in the follower of the Pure Land way. Any liberation divorced from that of all creatures is considered contrary to the spirit of great compassion which Amida himself extends to us all. Accordingly, Shinran does not view Nirvana as a blissfully self-absorbed state of repose where one remains oblivious to the harrowing plight of those left behind.


Continued -

Reflections on Genso-Eko ~ John Paraskevopoulos
All beings since their first aspiration till the attainment of Buddhahood are sheltered under the guardianship of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas who, responding to the requirements of the occasion, transform themselves and assume the actual forms of personality.

Thus for the sake of all beings Buddhas and Bodhisattvas become sometimes their parents, sometimes their wives and children, sometimes their kinsmen, sometimes their servants, sometimes their friends, sometimes their enemies, sometimes reveal themselves as devas or in some other forms.


- Ashvaghosa, The Awakening of Faith

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Re: How to cultivate a Bodhi mind?

Postby Nighthawk » Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:47 pm

Huifeng wrote:Hmmm, while there is course a lot of common ground between the Chinese and Japanese Pure Land traditions, I have very seldom if ever encountered full "other power" expressions in Chinese Pure Land practice. I have only ever encountered the idea that we still need to very sincerely bring about that faith and determination for rebirth in Sukhavati, and without doing that, we just are not going to get there. While Amitabha has made his vows, we still have to make vows to be reborn in Sukhavati.

~~ Huifeng


Having Shinjin (unwavering faith with zero doubts) in Amida Buddha and his Primal Vow is essential to being reborn in the Pure Land according to orthodox Jodo Shinshu. Relying solely on other power and having pure faith is not so easy as everyone makes it out to be imo.
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