Impermanence and beauty

Discuss your personal experience with the Dharma here. How has it enriched your life? What challenges does it present?

Impermanence and beauty

Postby Jesse » Wed Mar 07, 2012 6:54 pm

I'm curious what other peoples view on this is,

In Buddhism we realize the no-self nature of the world, the impermanence of everything, how grasping is absolutely useless. Is this supposed to make the world any less beautiful, even if we realize beauty isn't an actual quality?

I've been finding the world ever more beautiful, and I find it strange that somehow these things are normally seen as unwanted notions in society; mortality, the fleeting nature of happiness and the like. Has anyone ever woke up and been just absolutely astoundingly happy to be alive? Before my practice, I never experienced this.

and I find it funny the source of such happiness is nothing at all. I apologize for ranting!

Have a great day all. :yinyang:
"We know nothing at all. All our knowledge is but the knowledge of schoolchildren. The real nature of things we shall never know." - Albert Einstein
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Re: Impermanence and beauty

Postby MrDistracted » Wed Mar 07, 2012 7:05 pm

If that was a rant, I look forward to reading a eulogy :smile: ....

I tend to agree.

Seeing the impermanence of things and the futility of worldly life does make them/it exquisitely beautiful at times.

The most wonderful thing about renunciation seems to be the ability it gives to fearlessly embrace our experience of the world and appreciate it more and more.

I think it is a shame the concept of renunciation conjurs up such austere images to a lot of people.

I can only imagine that when one experiences the world as it truly is, it is mind blowingly beautiful.
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Re: Impermanence and beauty

Postby Jesse » Wed Mar 07, 2012 8:32 pm

:)
"We know nothing at all. All our knowledge is but the knowledge of schoolchildren. The real nature of things we shall never know." - Albert Einstein
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Re: Impermanence and beauty

Postby KeithBC » Sun Mar 11, 2012 3:41 am

ghost01 wrote:Is this supposed to make the world any less beautiful, even if we realize beauty isn't an actual quality?

Absolutely not. It is supposed to make you less attached to things like beauty. But being unattached does not mean you are unable to appreciate beauty. Personally, I think it enhances one's appreciation of beauty, because one doesn't get sidetracked by all the tangle of emotions that tend to go along with attachment to beauty.

Om mani padme hum
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Re: Impermanence and beauty

Postby Drew » Fri Mar 23, 2012 7:53 pm

The true beauty that impresses itself directly on your consciousness unfiltered, unjudged, beyond interpretation, effort, or contrivance.... like nature's song.

That beauty is part of the joy of awareness, is it not?
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Re: Impermanence and beauty

Postby duckfiasco » Fri Mar 23, 2012 9:16 pm

My experience so far has been that practice is like slowly waking up from a dull, drowsy state. Before, I would haul my ass out of bed then barely be aware of what I was doing for a good hour or two. Now, I do a gatha as soon as I wake up, and it's like a whole part of my life has uncovered itself... the shape of my lamp on the dimly lit ceiling, the feel of first gaining my balance after sleep, how a hot shower changes the feeling of the skin. Just paying attention brings such richness, joy, and gratitude.

There's so much we never notice because we think we already know all about everything. All we have is our collection of flat photographs. Spontaneous delight at small things, at just being alive like you said, has been one of the greatest gifts of Buddhist practice :group: Remember, joy is one of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment. :thumbsup:
The Perfect Way knows no difficulties
Except that it refuses to make preferences;
Only when freed from hate and love,
It reveals itself fully and without disguise.
- Sengcan (tr. Suzuki)
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Re: Impermanence and beauty

Postby Jesse » Fri Mar 23, 2012 11:49 pm

:smile:

The joy from practice certainly is something. I would notice especially after meditation, when I would sit and just observe things. There is a sense of very deep connection, like all of life is reaching out lovingly and saying hello. The tree's blowing in the wind dance, and there is no separation between their dancing, and the feeling of the wind against your skin.

Just very beautiful, and almost indescribable. Though as I've learned, there is a real possibility of becoming attached to such perceptions. :)

:namaste:
"We know nothing at all. All our knowledge is but the knowledge of schoolchildren. The real nature of things we shall never know." - Albert Einstein
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Re: Impermanence and beauty

Postby DarwidHalim » Sun Mar 25, 2012 2:49 am

For some people, impermanence is suffering, because whatever you get, it will fall apart. But for this kind of people, when they get sick for example, they never see that actually because of impermanent they can get cure.

So, what is the nature of impermanent?

If we look into it, if we really understand the nature, at every second there is no action, no actor, and no object. No substance can be form.

This is a good news! Why? Because at every second, there is nothing can be worried, there is nothing should be worry.

The nature of impermanent is actually natural liberation. You are always free actually, just depending whether you realize it or not.
I am not here nor there.
I am not right nor wrong.
I do not exist neither non-exist.
I am not I nor non-I.
I am not in samsara nor nirvana.
To All Buddhas, I bow down for the teaching of emptiness. Thank You!
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