A few words from "Moon in a dewdrop"

A few words from "Moon in a dewdrop"

Postby Jesse » Mon Feb 27, 2012 6:44 am

I just wanted to share this portion of the book, I have truly enjoyed reading this book.. but at times I have wondered if they are actually discussing anything at all, and then wham. Enjoy!

Zen master Baoji of Panshan said, "The mind moon is alone and full. Its light swallows myriad forms. Moonlight does not illuminate objects. Objects do not exist. Light and objects both disappear. What is this?
What is said here is that Buddha ancestors and Buddha heirs always have the mind moon, because they make moon their mind. There is no mind which is not moon, and there is no moon which is not mind.

Alone and full, means nothing lacking. Beyond two or three is called myriad forms. Myriad forms are moonlight, not merely forms. Accordingly its light swallows myriad forms, myriad forms completely swallow moonlight. Here moonlight swallowing moonlight is called "Its light swallows myriad forms." That is to say, the moon swallows the moon, the moon-light swallows the moon. Therefore it is said, "Moonlight does not illuminate objects. Objects do not exist."

Since this is so, at the moment of awakening others with a Buddha body, a Buddha body comes forth and expounds Dharma; at the moment of awakening others with the boundless body, the boundless body manifests and expounds Dharma. This is nothing but turning the Dharma wheel within the moon. No matter whether the yin spirit or the yang spirit illuminates--no matter whether the moon is a fire jewel or water jewel, it is immediately actualized.

This mind is the moon. This moon is itself mind. This is penetrating and comprehending the mind of Buddha ancestors and Buddha heirs.

An ancient Buddha said, "A single mind is all things. All things are a single mind."

Thus, mind is all things, all things are mind. Since mind is the moon, the moon is the moon. Since mind which is all things is completely moon, the all-inclusive world is the all-inclusive moon; entire body is entire moon.
Amid the "before and after, three-tree" in the myriad years of a moment-- which of these is not the moon? Sun-face Buddha, moon-face Buddha -- our body, mind and environment are also within the moon.

The coming and going of birth and death is also the moon. The entire world in the ten direction is the up and down, the left and right of the moon. Everyday activity at this moment is hundreds of grasses brilliant in the moon, the mind of ancestors brilliant in the moon.
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Re: A few words from "Moon in a dewdrop"

Postby White Lotus » Wed Feb 29, 2012 5:21 pm

am reading this book at the moment, probably one of the best ways to make an approach towards the shobogenzo. hope you enjoy it. i appreciate dogens freedom of mind.
best wishes, Tom.
in any matters of importance. dont rely on me. i may not know what i am talking about. take what i say as mere speculation. i am not ordained. nor do i have a formal training. i do believe though that if i am wrong on any point. there are those on this site who i hope will quickly point out my mistakes.
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Re: A few words from "Moon in a dewdrop"

Postby Quiet Heart » Thu Mar 01, 2012 2:53 am

:smile:
Before I start internet searching...is any of this little gem of a book available on line for download?
Guess I'm just being lazy...but just wondering what what I will find if i search?
:smile:
Shame on you Shakyamuni for setting the precedent of leaving home.
Did you think it was not there--
in your wife's lovely face
in your baby's laughter?
Did you think you had to go elsewhere (simply) to find it?
from - Judyth Collin
The Layman's Lament
From What Book, 1998, p. 52
Edited by Gary Gach
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Re: A few words from "Moon in a dewdrop"

Postby Fu Ri Shin » Thu Mar 01, 2012 3:24 am

Thank you for this, ghost01. I may put in a passage or two as well (if/when I find time to locate my copy) if you don't mind.

Quiet Heart: Some of the first 57 pages are available here. I would highly recommend getting a copy.
"Once delusion is extinguished, your wisdom naturally arises and you don’t differentiate suffering and joy. Actually, this joy and this suffering, they are the same."

— Chinese hermit, Amongst White Clouds
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Re: A few words from "Moon in a dewdrop"

Postby Jesse » Tue Mar 06, 2012 3:40 am

Fu Ri Shin, no problem.. and feel free to post whatever you like. :)

I've been considering one specific writing ever since I got the book.. :o

Great Master Wuben of Dongshan was once asked by a monk, "When cold or heat comes, how can we avoid it?"

The master said, "Why don't you go to where there is no cold or heat?"
The monk said, "What do you mean by 'where there is no cold or heat'?"
The master said, "When it is cold, cold finishes the monk. When it is hot, heat totals the monk."


Hopefully I'll get it one day. :ugeek:
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Re: A few words from "Moon in a dewdrop"

Postby elpilotojavier » Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:56 pm

When it is cold, cold finishes the monk. When it is hot, heat totals the monk.

It looks like a mistranslation to me. 'When it is cold, cold finishes the monk'. This should be like saying, the cold distracts you from the mindfulnes (finishes the monk). The second part 'heat totals the monk', that's what I think could be a mistraslation, because i don't understand it either.

"Why don't you go to where there is no cold or heat?"---> that should be mindfulness (heat or cold stop bothering you, stop being a problem)

That's my two cents.
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