hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

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hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

Postby klqv » Sat Feb 04, 2012 6:46 pm

hi,

not sure this is academic enough. it may well not be, but it's sssoooo important to me that i wanted to get the very best responses possible :)


i read that the middle way began aas the assertion against eternalism and annihilationism, and that with the abhidharma is began to mean the concept that each moment is er momentary but nonetheless there is continuity between them.


my question [and like i said, it's the big one for me] is if these two things were ever related to each other so that the latter implied the former: continuity so thought, implies that annihilation is impossible.

any helpful replies can't be more warmly greeted :) :)

cheers!
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Re: hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

Postby Mr. G » Sat Feb 04, 2012 8:04 pm

I don't understand the question you're asking.
    How foolish you are,
    grasping the letter of the text and ignoring its intention!
    - Vasubandhu
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Re: hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

Postby klqv » Sat Feb 04, 2012 8:32 pm

hi, how were the two ideas - of the buddha and the abhidharma, related? i thought maybe there might possibly be something about the latter implying the former - that given the nature of the causal series, we cannot be annihilated at death.


if that's still not clear i'll have to look for a quote.
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Re: hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

Postby Jikan » Sun Feb 05, 2012 2:17 pm

One approach: check out Swanson's _Foundations of T'ien T'ai Philosophy_
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Re: hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

Postby klqv » Sun Feb 05, 2012 5:53 pm

hi,
i have and have read that book! do you have any passages or parts in mind?
and do you indeed mean the middle way in the sravaka sutras as compared to the sravaka abhidharma??
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Re: hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

Postby Jikan » Mon Feb 06, 2012 12:43 am

Not talking about the shravakayana. The middle way you describe is the ekayana in my opinion.
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Re: hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

Postby DarwidHalim » Mon Feb 06, 2012 4:53 am

If I understand the question correctly, there is a conflict here between the notion of moment by moment (momentary) and continuity. Is it the question?
I am not here nor there.
I am not right nor wrong.
I do not exist neither non-exist.
I am not I nor non-I.
I am not in samsara nor nirvana.
To All Buddhas, I bow down for the teaching of emptiness. Thank You!
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Re: hi, middle way as continuity and as no annihilation / eterna

Postby klqv » Tue Feb 07, 2012 3:51 pm

i am asking about annihilationism.

at one point it meant there is no rebirth, then later it meant the denial of continuity - i think.

by annihilationism he meant the denial of an eternally existent self, together with the presumed consequence that the person goes out of existence after a relatively short duration 8...

8. In the Brahmajala sutra the Buddha descrobes the annihilationist as someone who believes we escpe the karmic consequences of our deeds at death. In early Buddhism, then, annihilationism is the view that the person endures for a single lifetime, but is annihilated upon death... It is only in the Abhidharma that it comes to mean the denial of any enduring subject whatever.


i was wondering about the development of the concept of annihilationism, and even if the abidharma refutation of it implied or subsumed the early buddhist one.



maybe it's a bad question...
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