What are the Buddhist traditions and who is the Buddha?

General discussion, particularly exploring the Dharma in the modern world.
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Ngawang Drolma
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What are the Buddhist traditions and who is the Buddha?

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Thu Apr 08, 2010 4:17 am

What are the various Buddhist traditions?

Generally, there are two divisions: Theravada and Mahayana.

The Theravada lineage (Tradition of the Elders), which relies on sutras recorded in the Pali language, spread from India to Sri Lanka, Thailand, Burma, etc. It emphasizes meditation on the breath to develop concentration and meditation on mindfulness of the body, feelings, mind and phenomena in order to develop wisdom.

The Mahayana (Great Vehicle) tradition, based on the scriptures recorded in Sanskrit, spread to China, Tibet, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, etc. Although in the Theravadin practice love and compassion are essential and important factors, in the Mahayana they are emphasized to an even greater extent.

Within Mahayana, there are several branches: Pure Land emphasizes chanting the name of Amitabha Buddha in order to be reborn in His Pure Land; Zen emphasizes meditation to eliminate the noisy, conceptual mind; Within Mahayana, there are several branches: Pure Land emphasizes chanting the name of Amitabha Buddha in order to be reborn in His Pure Land; Zen emphasizes meditation to eliminate the noisy, conceptual mind; Vajrayana (Diamond Vehicle) employs meditation on a deity in order to transform our contaminated body and mind into the body and mind of a Buddha.


Who is the Buddha?

There are many ways to describe who the Buddha is, according to different ways of understanding . These various interpretations have their sources in the Buddha’s teachings.

One way is to see the historical Buddha who lived 2,500 years ago as a human being who cleansed his mind of all defilements and developed all his potential. Any being who does likewise is also considered a Buddha, for there are many Buddhas, not just one.

Another way is to understand a particular Buddha or Buddhist deity as omniscient mind manifesting in a certain physical aspect in order to communicate with us.

Yet another way is to see the Buddha -- or any of the enlightened Buddhist deities -- as the appearance of the future Buddha that we will become once we properly and completely have engaged in the path to cleanse our mind of defilements and develop all our potentials.

http://www.fpmt.org/faq/buddhism_faq.asp#bteach

plwk
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Re: What are the Buddhist traditions and who is the Buddha?

Postby plwk » Thu Apr 08, 2010 6:29 am


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David N. Snyder
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Re: What are the Buddhist traditions and who is the Buddha?

Postby David N. Snyder » Thu Apr 08, 2010 7:22 pm

Ngawang Drolma wrote:What are the various Buddhist traditions?
http://www.fpmt.org/faq/buddhism_faq.asp#bteach


That is a good synopsis and avoids the lowering of any tradition with any derogatory words.

:thanks:

KennC
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Re: What are the Buddhist traditions and who is the Buddha?

Postby KennC » Wed Dec 19, 2012 3:01 pm

Today the two main branches of Buddhism are Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism. To understand the similarities and differences between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism, we need to trace the emergence of Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism by looking at the historical developments of Buddhism.

The division of Buddhism can be traced back to the time of the Second Council, in the 4th century B.C., about 100 years after the Buddha’s death. At that time, the Sangha began to split into two groups of monks due to dispute over Vinaya(rules) or disagreements on attainment of Arhatship . The Sthaviravada was formed by orthodox monks who disagree to changes. The Mahasanghika was formed by monks who rejected certain portions of the original canon. By the time of Emperor Ashoka in the 3rd century B.C., eighteen different sects there arisen out of this two branches.

There is a easy to understand table comparing the similarities and difference between Theravada and Mahayana. Unable to paste here....so read from here http://www.buddhastation.com/articles/comparing-similarities-and-differences-between-theravada-and-mahayana-buddhism/


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