Garlic, leeks and onions

Whether you're exploring Buddhism for the first time or you're already on the path, feel free to ask questions of any kind here.

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Dave The Seeker » Thu Dec 22, 2011 11:39 pm

Was just actually looking and dang near all the oriental seasoning sauces, except soy sauce, have one or both of these in them.
I've never had a problem with gas because of either.....but kissing....well :lol:


Kindest wishes
Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~
User avatar
Dave The Seeker
 
Posts: 409
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:02 pm
Location: Reading MI USA

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby lotwell » Thu Jan 05, 2012 6:06 am

I don't think the Buddha ever taught anything about garlic, leeks, or onions but I know what your are thinking of. And it has nothing to do with smell ; )

Garlic and Onion (and I suppose leek as well) consume the entire organism when harvested. It is common for Jain and some Hindus to not eat garlic and onions due to ahimsa.

lotwell
lotwell
 
Posts: 64
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2012 3:59 pm

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Distorted » Mon Jan 09, 2012 10:28 pm

Did Buddha eat that last meal knowning it was going to be his end?
"Sona, before you became a monk you were a musician". Sona said that was true. So the Buddha said, "As a musician which string of the lute produces a pleasant and harmonious sound. The over-tight string?" "No," said Sona, "The over-tight string produces an unpleasant sound and is moreover likely to break at any moment." "The string that is too loose?" Again, "No, the string that is too loose does not produce a tuneful sound. The string that produces a tuneful sound is the string that is not too tight and not too loose."
User avatar
Distorted
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 7:26 am

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby catmoon » Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:27 pm

I believe he did, yes.
Sergeant Schultz knew everything there was to know.
User avatar
catmoon
Former staff member
 
Posts: 3006
Joined: Thu Nov 19, 2009 3:20 am
Location: British Columbia

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Distorted » Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:24 am

What does Buddha say about eating bad things knowingly?
"Sona, before you became a monk you were a musician". Sona said that was true. So the Buddha said, "As a musician which string of the lute produces a pleasant and harmonious sound. The over-tight string?" "No," said Sona, "The over-tight string produces an unpleasant sound and is moreover likely to break at any moment." "The string that is too loose?" Again, "No, the string that is too loose does not produce a tuneful sound. The string that produces a tuneful sound is the string that is not too tight and not too loose."
User avatar
Distorted
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 7:26 am

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby catmoon » Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:36 am

It would depend a great deal on the circumstances. A Buddha doing such a thing would have the enormous advantage of knowing exactly how the karma would work out. So, were you referring to ordering onions on your pizza or what?
Sergeant Schultz knew everything there was to know.
User avatar
catmoon
Former staff member
 
Posts: 3006
Joined: Thu Nov 19, 2009 3:20 am
Location: British Columbia

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Distorted » Tue Jan 10, 2012 6:23 pm

catmoon wrote:It would depend a great deal on the circumstances. A Buddha doing such a thing would have the enormous advantage of knowing exactly how the karma would work out. So, were you referring to ordering onions on your pizza or what?



It is better for me to ask questions than to take guesses. No pizza. I am wondering if things one may learn in buddhism are so bendable that the original path just had many additions that leads to distraction to what is really important. The other thought is on impermanence, if everything is subject to impermanence does that mean buddha's teachings so one can be enlightened impermanent?

Which like bruce lee kept a strong foundation of old teachings and kept what was the most effective. In doing that had to seek that out in his own mind than to follow what is said to the book.

I am not asking these things to be provocative. I am asking because much of this is new to me and I want to learn. If I am really far off it would be nice to understand the facts.
"Sona, before you became a monk you were a musician". Sona said that was true. So the Buddha said, "As a musician which string of the lute produces a pleasant and harmonious sound. The over-tight string?" "No," said Sona, "The over-tight string produces an unpleasant sound and is moreover likely to break at any moment." "The string that is too loose?" Again, "No, the string that is too loose does not produce a tuneful sound. The string that produces a tuneful sound is the string that is not too tight and not too loose."
User avatar
Distorted
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 7:26 am

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Mr. G » Tue Jan 10, 2012 8:39 pm

Distorted wrote:
I am wondering if things one may learn in buddhism are so bendable that the original path just had many additions that leads to distraction to what is really important.


Sure, no different than anything else.

The other thought is on impermanence, if everything is subject to impermanence does that mean buddha's teachings so one can be enlightened impermanent?


From the Kosa:

    4b-c. Conditioned dharmas, with the exception of the Path, are
    impure.

    5a-b. The undefiled truth of the Path and the three unconditioned
    things are pure.
    How foolish you are,
    grasping the letter of the text and ignoring its intention!
    - Vasubandhu
User avatar
Mr. G
 
Posts: 4098
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 6:36 am
Location: Spaceship Earth

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Distorted » Wed Jan 11, 2012 5:10 am

Mr. G wrote:
Distorted wrote:
I am wondering if things one may learn in buddhism are so bendable that the original path just had many additions that leads to distraction to what is really important.


Sure, no different than anything else.

The other thought is on impermanence, if everything is subject to impermanence does that mean buddha's teachings so one can be enlightened impermanent?


From the Kosa:

    4b-c. Conditioned dharmas, with the exception of the Path, are
    impure.

    5a-b. The undefiled truth of the Path and the three unconditioned
    things are pure.



Thank you, that was very helpful. :thumbsup:
"Sona, before you became a monk you were a musician". Sona said that was true. So the Buddha said, "As a musician which string of the lute produces a pleasant and harmonious sound. The over-tight string?" "No," said Sona, "The over-tight string produces an unpleasant sound and is moreover likely to break at any moment." "The string that is too loose?" Again, "No, the string that is too loose does not produce a tuneful sound. The string that produces a tuneful sound is the string that is not too tight and not too loose."
User avatar
Distorted
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 7:26 am

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Adamantine » Wed Jan 11, 2012 7:24 am

lotwell wrote:I don't think the Buddha ever taught anything about garlic, leeks, or onions but I know what your are thinking of. And it has nothing to do with smell ; )

Garlic and Onion (and I suppose leek as well) consume the entire organism when harvested. It is common for Jain and some Hindus to not eat garlic and onions due to ahimsa.

lotwell


But then you'd lump those together with beets, carrots, mushrooms, lettuce, etc. . usually, they fall into their own category of restriction, so it is clearly not an ahimsa issue..
Contentment is the ultimate wealth;
Detachment is the final happiness. ~Sri Saraha
User avatar
Adamantine
Former staff member
 
Posts: 2954
Joined: Tue Feb 08, 2011 7:09 am
Location: Space is the Place

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby lotwell » Thu Jan 12, 2012 2:54 am

Adamantine wrote:
lotwell wrote:I don't think the Buddha ever taught anything about garlic, leeks, or onions but I know what your are thinking of. And it has nothing to do with smell ; )

Garlic and Onion (and I suppose leek as well) consume the entire organism when harvested. It is common for Jain and some Hindus to not eat garlic and onions due to ahimsa.

lotwell


But then you'd lump those together with beets, carrots, mushrooms, lettuce, etc. . usually, they fall into their own category of restriction, so it is clearly not an ahimsa issue..


Yes, those are all root vegetables except mushrooms (which are the sexual organs actually) and lettuce. I wasn't claiming that these are restricted in Buddhism but meant to suggest that the OP was confusing Jain dietary restrictions with Buddhist.

Lotwell
lotwell
 
Posts: 64
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2012 3:59 pm

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Dave The Seeker » Thu Jan 12, 2012 2:32 pm

I have been looking through the book I read this in.
"Awakening the Buddha within" by Lama Surya Das, but have yet to come across the page.

I am sure he stated in the book about these vegetables to not be consumed. I'll keep looking and hopefully find the page so I can post the paragraph it was written in, So it won't seem to be taken out of context.


Kindest wishes, Dave
Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~
User avatar
Dave The Seeker
 
Posts: 409
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:02 pm
Location: Reading MI USA

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Dave The Seeker » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:10 pm

I read this in a teaching by Lama Zopa Rinpoche

In things you should not give when practicing generosity:
obliging ordained people to take things they cannot, such as garlic, meat or wine, or to give them such things as food left on others' plates or dirty food.


Still wondering about this, seems it is something not to be used :shrug:


Kindest wishes, Dave
Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~
User avatar
Dave The Seeker
 
Posts: 409
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:02 pm
Location: Reading MI USA

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Indrajala » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:44 pm

The Seeker wrote:Was just actually looking and dang near all the oriental seasoning sauces, except soy sauce, have one or both of these in them.
I've never had a problem with gas because of either.....but kissing....well :lol:


Kindest wishes


Most processed seasoning sauces will have garlic and/or onions, yes.

However, if you cook Chinese vegetarian style, then your main condiments will be sesame seed oil, soya sauce and other spices like cinnamon.

Taiwanese vegetarian is especially light on sauces, but quite tasty.
Flower Ornament Depository (Blog)
Indrajāla's Contemplations (Blog)
Exploring Classical Chinese (Blog)
Dharma Depository (Site)

"Hui gives me no assistance. There is nothing that I say in which he does not delight." -Confucius
User avatar
Indrajala
 
Posts: 5863
Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2010 3:19 pm
Location: Nepal

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Dave The Seeker » Sat Jan 21, 2012 7:36 pm

Thanks for the reply and information Huseng.
I really appreciate it.

Kindest wishes, Dave
Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~
User avatar
Dave The Seeker
 
Posts: 409
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:02 pm
Location: Reading MI USA

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby SteveP » Mon Jan 30, 2012 3:43 pm

I have heard some indians say that onions cause aggression. Its a cutural teaching that actually isn't correct, I dont think there is any correlation between aggression and onion eating....but if people belived that eating onions could cause agression, you can see why it was warned not to eat them.
SteveP
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:55 pm

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby zamotcr » Thu Jun 28, 2012 4:29 am

Sorry to answer to this old thread.

Do this mean that we should abstain from eating garlics?
Or is this just a cultural influence? I don't see me without garlic on my bread lol
User avatar
zamotcr
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 3:11 am
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Seishin » Thu Jun 28, 2012 9:03 am

Garlic, leeks and onions tend to give me indigestion at the least or flatulence at the worst. I tend not to eat them before meditation or going out etc.

Gassho,
Seishin
User avatar
Seishin
Former staff member
 
Posts: 1407
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 11:53 am

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby zamotcr » Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:02 am

I don't know, but I love garlic and onions. So I think I have ghosts kissing me lol.

But seriusly, I don't know how to take all of this, is just cultural or will I reborn on a hell after dead? lol
User avatar
zamotcr
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 3:11 am
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica

Re: Garlic, leeks and onions

Postby Seishin » Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:11 am

zamotcr wrote:I don't know, but I love garlic and onions. So I think I have ghosts kissing me lol.

But seriusly, I don't know how to take all of this, is just cultural or will I reborn on a hell after dead? lol


I had always thought that this rule was for monastics only and not for lay people. But one of the more learned persons on this forum might correct that point.

Gassho,
Seishin.
User avatar
Seishin
Former staff member
 
Posts: 1407
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 11:53 am

PreviousNext

Return to Exploring Buddhism

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: KeithBC, Yahoo [Bot] and 10 guests

>