Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Discuss and learn about the traditional scriptures.

Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Thu Nov 03, 2011 6:38 am

Rulu's latest and longest sutra translation is now available. The preparation and vows for the layman as given in this sutra are far more profound than those of the present day. See chapter 14.


http://www.sutrasmantras.info/sutra33a.html
Last edited by Will on Tue Nov 22, 2011 4:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Thu Nov 03, 2011 3:37 pm

From Chapter 8:

Bodhisattvas in False Name

Sujāta asked, “World-Honored One, the Buddha speaks of two kinds of Bodhisattvas, Bodhisattvas in false name and Bodhisattvas in true meaning. What is meant by Bodhisattvas in false name?”

“Good man, after sentient beings have activated the bodhi mind, some of them instead delight in accepting and upholding non-Buddhist ways, read and recite their texts, and teach them to others. They do not cultivate compassion, and they take others’ lives for the sake of their own bodies and lives. Delighted to undergo repeated birth and death, they do karmas, aiming to capture the pleasures in their cycle of birth and death. Having no faith in the Three Jewels, their minds hold a web of doubts. Cherishing and protecting themselves, they cannot endure insults, and they speak coarse words without restraint or remorse. They belittle themselves and say, ‘I cannot attain the unsurpassed bodhi.’
“Although they fear their afflictions, they do not diligently train to eradicate them by skillful means, so they always have greed, anger, stinginess, and jealousy. With an indolent and chaotic mind, they choose to stay close to evil friends. They prefer their ignorance of the truth, and they disbelieve in the six pāramitās. They neither accumulate merits nor observe [the evils of undergoing repeated] birth and death. They appreciate others’ evil words. Bodhisattvas such as these are called Bodhisattvas in false name.
“Good man, there are sentient beings that activate the bodhi mind to attain anuttara-samyak-saṁbodhi. But after hearing that they can attain bodhi only through ascetic training for innumerable kalpas, they then regret it. They train for bodhi without conviction. Lacking a sense of shame and dishonor, and without compassion, they delight in the non-Buddhist practice of killing goats as an offering to gods [or God]. They have some faith, but it is not firm. They do evil in pursuit of the pleasures of the five desires. Banking on their body, life, and wealth, they are very arrogant. However, their ill-motivated deeds cannot benefit them. They give alms with a view to acquiring pleasures in their cyclic existence. They observe the precepts with a view to being reborn in heaven. They practice meditation with a view to lengthening their lifespans. Bodhisattvas such as these are called Bodhisattvas in false name."
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Invoking Compassion

Postby Will » Sat Nov 05, 2011 4:28 pm

From Chapter Three:

Invoking Compassion

“World-Honored One, how does one invoke compassion?”
“Good man, a wise man sees deeply that sentient beings are sinking in the ocean of suffering, the immense ocean of repeated birth and death. He invokes compassion because he wishes to rescue them; or because he sees that sentient beings lack [the Eighteen Exclusive Dharmas]—the Ten Powers, the Four Fearlessnesses, the Great Compassion, and the Threefold Mindfulness of Equality—and he wishes to enable them to have these abilities.
“[He invokes compassion] because he regards as his kin sentient beings bearing grudges and malice; because he sees that sentient beings have lost the right path and guidance; because he sees that sentient beings, trapped in the mud of the five desires, abandon self-restraint; because he sees that sentient beings are unable to break the bondage of their spouses and assets; because he sees that sentient beings are proud of their bodies and lives; or because he regards sentient beings as his kin, though they are bewitched by evil friends, such as the six non-Buddhist masters.
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings are attached to their rebirths in the Three Realms of Existence, undergoing suffering; because he sees that sentient beings are attached to the painful requitals for their evil karmas done with body, voice, and mind; or because he sees that sentient beings thirst for the five desires, like drinking salt water to quench thirst.
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings seek happiness but do not produce the causes of happiness, that they fear suffering but delight in producing the causes of suffering, and that they seek to be reborn as gods, to enjoy celestial pleasures, but do not observe the precepts; because he sees that sentient beings believe that they have a self and its belongings, though these are nonexistent; because he sees that sentient beings, without a definite nature, transmigrate through the five life-paths; because he sees that sentient beings fear birth, old age, and death, but do karmas that make them repeat birth, old age, and death; or because he sees that sentient beings suffer in body and mind but do more karmas [that cause suffering].
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings suffer the pain of love and parting but do not cease loving; because he sees that sentient beings remain in the dark of ignorance, not knowing the glowing radiance of the wisdom lamp; because he sees that sentient beings burn in the fire of afflictions but do not seek the water of samādhi; because he sees that sentient beings do immeasurable evils for the pleasures of the five desires; because he sees that sentient beings know the pains of the five desires but endlessly seek them, like the hungry feeding on poisoned food; or because he sees that sentient beings suffer under a cruel ruler in an evil world but still abandon self-restraint.
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings in the eight kinds of suffering do not know how to end the causes of their suffering; because he sees that sentient beings cannot help undergoing hunger, thirst, cold, and heat; because he sees that sentient beings violate the precepts and will be reborn as hell-dwellers, hungry ghosts, or animals; because he sees that sentient beings have no command of their body, strength, lifespan, peace of mind, or eloquence; because he sees sentient beings with incomplete faculties; because he sees that sentient beings are born in fringe countries [where the Dharma is unavailable] and fail to do good dharmas; because he sees that, in times of famine, emaciated sentient beings rob one another; or because he sees that, in times of war, sentient beings, out of malice, harm one another and will receive immeasurable painful requitals.
“[He invokes compassion] because he sees that sentient beings, having encountered a Buddha in the world, are unable to accept and uphold the pure Dharma, which is like sweet dew; because he sees that sentient beings choose to believe in evil friends and refuse to follow the teachings of beneficent learned friends; because he sees that wealthy sentient beings refuse to give alms; because he sees that sentient beings suffer in making a living by farming or merchandising; or because he sees that sentient beings, including parents, siblings, spouses, servants, and relatives, do not love one another.
“All sentient beings undergo such suffering. Good man, a wise man invokes compassion because he sees that even the bliss of samādhi in Neither with Nor without Perception Heaven is like the pain in hell.
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby plwk » Sun Nov 06, 2011 5:34 am

http://www.sutrasmantras.info/sutra33g.html
“Good man, after my parinirvāṇa, some of my disciples will say that one who kills a parent misperceived as someone else is not guilty of the rebellious sin.
These disciples belong to the Dharmaguptaka sect.
Members of the Mahīśāsaka sect will say that the killer has committed the rebellious sin.
Members of the Sarvāstivāda sect will also say that the killer has committed the rebellious sin.
Why? Because worldly facts are convincing. Being one’s parent cannot be changed by one’s misperception.

Seems like someone doesn't like/agree with what those various schools opines ... then the other question is: were any of those groups mentioned existed during the Buddha's time? :popcorn:
plwk
 
Posts: 2660
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2010 10:41 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Sun Nov 06, 2011 6:21 pm

plwk wrote:
http://www.sutrasmantras.info/sutra33g.html
“Good man, after my parinirvāṇa, some of my disciples will say that one who kills a parent misperceived as someone else is not guilty of the rebellious sin.
These disciples belong to the Dharmaguptaka sect.
Members of the Mahīśāsaka sect will say that the killer has committed the rebellious sin.
Members of the Sarvāstivāda sect will also say that the killer has committed the rebellious sin.
Why? Because worldly facts are convincing. Being one’s parent cannot be changed by one’s misperception.

Seems like someone doesn't like/agree with what those various schools opines ... then the other question is: were any of those groups mentioned existed during the Buddha's time? :popcorn:


Gautama Buddha is the Guru and he said "will say" - so he looking into the future and predicting such distortions
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby plwk » Mon Nov 07, 2011 6:10 am

Gautama Buddha is the Guru

No doubt...
..and he said "will say" - so he looking into the future and predicting such distortions

Is this your own assertion or is there a precedent to this statement?
Yet there are other writings that hinted on distortions without mentioning anyone by name... and when it does, it's oft those that are present during His time and not speculated ones.

If that were the case, why stop only at the early 18 Schools and not include what is present today as well?
So, what's next? The Yogacarins got it wrong? Or the Nichirens? Or Tian Tai? Or the Nyingmapas?

Let's not forget that the Chinese Mahayana & its associate traditions use the Dharmaguptaka Vinaya for ordination.
If they were so 'flawed' in their Dharma, why should we use their Vinaya today?
And Sarvastivada has considerable influence back then and even up until today in many aspects of Dharma teaching and Abhidharma?

I am more convinced that this piece of work may be a sample of what I have read on what some scholars talk about 'post sectarian writings', otherwise the rest of it is an excellent piece on cultivation. Then again, what I think is of no importance, what matters is someone out there benefits from the overall theme and content per se...
plwk
 
Posts: 2660
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2010 10:41 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Aemilius » Sat Nov 12, 2011 11:32 am

About Rulu's work: I think his translations are really good, but I have doubts about the Digital Chinese Buddhist Canon that he uses as his source material. It seems to me that there has occurred some re-editing of the Canon, or even modernisation of it, I would dare to say. Do we have older versions of the Chinese canon in existence, in some secret underground vault maybe?
svaha
User avatar
Aemilius
 
Posts: 1507
Joined: Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:44 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:36 pm

Aemilius wrote:About Rulu's work: I think his translations are really good, but I have doubts about the Digital Chinese Buddhist Canon that he uses as his source material. It seems to me that there has occurred some re-editing of the Canon, or even modernisation of it, I would dare to say. Do we have older versions of the Chinese canon in existence, in some secret underground vault maybe?


Rulu responds:
The digitized Canon is the Taishō Tripiṭaka. The following paragraph is copied from my book Teachings of the Buddha. There is no need to look for a vault. Everything is available.

"Between 1998 and 2003 the Chinese Buddhist Electronic Text Association (CBETA) in Taiwan digitized the Chinese Canon. It is based on the Taishō Tripiṭaka (大正新脩大藏經), published in Tokyo in 1934, which in turn is based on the Tripiṭaka Koreana, carved on wooden blocks by Korean monks between 1236 and 1251. This collection includes 2,373 sūtras and other texts. Between 2004 and 2007 CBETA digitized the Shinsan Zokuzōkyō (卍續藏), the Extension of the Chinese Canon. This collection includes 1,229 sūtras and other texts. The entire CBETA digital collection includes the Taishō Tripiṭaka, T01–T55, T85, and the Shinsan Zokuzōkyō, X01–X88, where T and X stand for volume. Each text is identified by its volume and text numbers. For example, T10n0279 means volume 10, text 279, of the Taishō Tripiṭaka, and X74n1480 means volume 74, text 1480, of the Shinsan Zokuzōkyō. Any passage in a text can also be found by its page, column, and line numbers in the Taishō edition of the Chinese Canon. For example, 0272c25–0273a1 means from page 272, column c, line 25, to page 273, column a, line 1. The entire CBETA collection is posted on the Internet and available on DVD-ROM for free distribution."

The 2009 version of the digital Canon also presents as footnotes different wordings, if any, in the Song, Yuan, Ming, Qing editions of the Chinese Canon. Wrong words in the Taishō are also identified in footnotes. The text remains intact.

Rulu
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:58 pm

A reminder that Rulu can be contacted directly at: dharma@sutrasmantras.info
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Thug4lyfe » Tue Nov 22, 2011 7:00 am

woooo, thanks for this thread! Alerted me on how much I have let myself go lately!!!!

:bow: :bow: :cry: :cry:
Image
User avatar
Thug4lyfe
 
Posts: 454
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2011 11:40 pm

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Thu Nov 24, 2011 6:34 pm

Wonder what Ven. Huifeng thinks of the quality of Rulu's translations?
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Blue Garuda » Thu Nov 24, 2011 8:12 pm

I'm not sure I understand the link between joy in performing acts which lead to suffering and rebirth and lack of belief in the 3 Jewels.

There are surely Hindu texts out there that express similar views of karma and vipaka.

I know of no religion in which the guru does not state that his way is superior over other religions or sects, sometimes softened by a teaching that we should not comment adversely on the other poor beings who are wrong.

There is a clear messsage of the importance of Compassion. For sure, a mind filled with Compassion cannot succumb to Attachment or Anger. However, Compassion does not preclude advising others - in fact it demands that a person does what is best.

I also noted this comment:

''“Good man, those who initially do not have the bodhi mind may activate it later. Likewise, those who initially do not have Bodhisattva nature may develop it later. Therefore, one should not say that sentient beings definitely have Bodhisattva nature. ''

If senteint beings all have Buddha Nature, which is revealed as delusions are stripped away, then how can they not all have Bodhisattva Nature?
Left
Blue Garuda
 
Posts: 2000
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:23 pm

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Thu Nov 24, 2011 9:41 pm

Blue G.
''“Good man, those who initially do not have the bodhi mind may activate it later. Likewise, those who initially do not have Bodhisattva nature may develop it later. Therefore, one should not say that sentient beings definitely have Bodhisattva nature. ''

If sentient beings all have Buddha Nature, which is revealed as delusions are stripped away, then how can they not all have Bodhisattva Nature?


There are two views of buddha nature 1) inherent & fully buddha or 2) only a potential that will never develop if conditions are not fostered. This sutra supports view #2

If you would cut & paste the passages you are referring to it would help the rest of us.
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Blue Garuda » Thu Nov 24, 2011 9:54 pm

Will wrote:Blue G.
''“Good man, those who initially do not have the bodhi mind may activate it later. Likewise, those who initially do not have Bodhisattva nature may develop it later. Therefore, one should not say that sentient beings definitely have Bodhisattva nature. ''

If sentient beings all have Buddha Nature, which is revealed as delusions are stripped away, then how can they not all have Bodhisattva Nature?


There are two views of buddha nature 1) inherent & fully buddha or 2) only a potential that will never develop if conditions are not fostered. This sutra supports view #2

If you would cut & paste the passages you are referring to it would help the rest of us.


Um, I did precisely that - I cut and pasted the text about Buddha Nature and Bodhisattva nature from:
'Bodhisattva Nature Revealed by the Bodhi Mind' from the link you gave.

My other comments related to text you have already pasted in your posts, such as:

'“Good man, after sentient beings have activated the bodhi mind, some of them instead delight in accepting and upholding non-Buddhist ways, read and recite their texts, and teach them to others. They do not cultivate compassion, and they take others’ lives for the sake of their own bodies and lives. Delighted to undergo repeated birth and death, they do karmas, aiming to capture the pleasures in their cycle of birth and death. Having no faith in the Three Jewels, their minds hold a web of doubts. Cherishing and protecting themselves, they cannot endure insults, and they speak coarse words without restraint or remorse. They belittle themselves and say, ‘I cannot attain the unsurpassed bodhi.''
Left
Blue Garuda
 
Posts: 2000
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:23 pm

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:11 am

Blue Garuda wrote:
Will wrote:Blue G.
''“Good man, those who initially do not have the bodhi mind may activate it later. Likewise, those who initially do not have Bodhisattva nature may develop it later. Therefore, one should not say that sentient beings definitely have Bodhisattva nature. ''

If sentient beings all have Buddha Nature, which is revealed as delusions are stripped away, then how can they not all have Bodhisattva Nature?


There are two views of buddha nature 1) inherent & fully buddha or 2) only a potential that will never develop if conditions are not fostered. This sutra supports view #2

If you would cut & paste the passages you are referring to it would help the rest of us.


Um, I did precisely that - I cut and pasted the text about Buddha Nature and Bodhisattva nature from:
'Bodhisattva Nature Revealed by the Bodhi Mind' from the link you gave.

My other comments related to text you have already pasted in your posts, such as:

'“Good man, after sentient beings have activated the bodhi mind, some of them instead delight in accepting and upholding non-Buddhist ways, read and recite their texts, and teach them to others. They do not cultivate compassion, and they take others’ lives for the sake of their own bodies and lives. Delighted to undergo repeated birth and death, they do karmas, aiming to capture the pleasures in their cycle of birth and death. Having no faith in the Three Jewels, their minds hold a web of doubts. Cherishing and protecting themselves, they cannot endure insults, and they speak coarse words without restraint or remorse. They belittle themselves and say, ‘I cannot attain the unsurpassed bodhi.''


Thanks, now I am with you.

The "links" between all these negative acts are the feeble nature of the "activated" bodhi mind. The energy of the initial activation was very low and without more meritorious fuel being added the Maha vehicle will stall. So if one has such a small, flickering flame of bodhichitta to start with, one needs to reverse all the actions in the rest of the quote - delight in upholding Buddhist ways, take joy in reading & reciting Buddhist shastras & sutras etc.
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Blue Garuda » Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:01 am

Will wrote:
Thanks, now I am with you.

The "links" between all these negative acts are the feeble nature of the "activated" bodhi mind. The energy of the initial activation was very low and without more meritorious fuel being added the Maha vehicle will stall. So if one has such a small, flickering flame of bodhichitta to start with, one needs to reverse all the actions in the rest of the quote - delight in upholding Buddhist ways, take joy in reading & reciting Buddhist shastras & sutras etc.


Thanks. I've not come across that explanation before. I had thought the two views of Buddha Nature were either revelatory (of what we already possess as fully developed) or developmental (through practice and training the mind until it attains enlightenment). The same actions seem necessary on the part of the practitioner whichever model we believe.
Left
Blue Garuda
 
Posts: 2000
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:23 pm

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Will » Fri Nov 25, 2011 4:25 pm

Blue Garuda wrote:
Will wrote:
Thanks, now I am with you.

The "links" between all these negative acts are the feeble nature of the "activated" bodhi mind. The energy of the initial activation was very low and without more meritorious fuel being added the Maha vehicle will stall. So if one has such a small, flickering flame of bodhichitta to start with, one needs to reverse all the actions in the rest of the quote - delight in upholding Buddhist ways, take joy in reading & reciting Buddhist shastras & sutras etc.


Thanks. I've not come across that explanation before. I had thought the two views of Buddha Nature were either revelatory (of what we already possess as fully developed) or developmental (through practice and training the mind until it attains enlightenment). The same actions seem necessary on the part of the practitioner whichever model we believe.


re: last sentence - Maybe not, Dzogchenists and other lineages seem to suggest that profound and deep enough awareness or insight will supplant all that merit-making. But I am not sure if that means just in the last lifetime or at any point in any lifetime?
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
User avatar
Will
 
Posts: 1918
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Aemilius » Tue Sep 04, 2012 10:02 am

Will wrote:A reminder that Rulu can be contacted directly at: dharma@sutrasmantras.info


For Rulu
The passage that I am doubtfull about is in the Bodhisattva Precepts Sutra, (the one that has Buddha Rocana). In it there are the four Parajikas of the Bodhisattva precepts. Do you have any version of this Sutra printed in the early 1900's, or before? Does it say the same thing about the Four Parajikas?
I am quite sure this new translation is also a new version of it. It has been different for thousands of years.
This particular sutra exists also in mongolian and tibetan versions. In the long run you will not get away with this new version of the Four Parajikas.
svaha
User avatar
Aemilius
 
Posts: 1507
Joined: Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:44 am

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Jnana » Thu Sep 06, 2012 8:12 am

Aemilius wrote:The passage that I am doubtfull about is in the Bodhisattva Precepts Sutra, (the one that has Buddha Rocana). In it there are the four Parajikas of the Bodhisattva precepts. Do you have any version of this Sutra printed in the early 1900's, or before? Does it say the same thing about the Four Parajikas?
I am quite sure this new translation is also a new version of it. It has been different for thousands of years.
This particular sutra exists also in mongolian and tibetan versions. In the long run you will not get away with this new version of the Four Parajikas.

What specifically are your concerns? I just looked at Rulu's translation of The Book of Bodhisattva Precepts and the four parājikas are the same as what is given in the Bodhisattvabhūmi of the Yogācārabhūmiśāstra.
Jnana
 
Posts: 1106
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 12:58 pm

Re: Upasaka Precepts Sutra

Postby Aemilius » Thu Sep 06, 2012 2:03 pm

Jnana wrote:What specifically are your concerns? I just looked at Rulu's translation of The Book of Bodhisattva Precepts and the four parājikas are the same as what is given in the Bodhisattvabhūmi of the Yogācārabhūmiśāstra.


Thanks!
The Fourth root downfall has previously been translated as: "Saying that the Mahayana sutras are not a teaching of the Buddha constitutes a root downfall".
Rulu's translation is too mild and a watered down version of it. Your Yogachara bhumi sastra comes probably from the same bureau?

A better translation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodhisattva_vow#Asanga.27s_Bodhisattvabhumi
svaha
User avatar
Aemilius
 
Posts: 1507
Joined: Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:44 am

Next

Return to Sūtra Studies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

>