Chinese Buddhist canon

Discuss and learn about the traditional Mahayana scriptures, without assuming that any one school ‘owns’ the only correct interpretation.
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Lazy_eye
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Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Lazy_eye » Mon Jul 18, 2011 11:36 pm

Hi all,

Information on the Chinese canon seems a little hard to come by -- at least in comparison to the Pali Canon, although my understanding is that the Chinese canon is just as old and perhaps even older (some scholars have claim the Pali wasn't finalized until the time of Buddhaghosa). I was wondering: what are the earliest surviving documents from this canon? Are there any known major discrepancies between the Chinese agamas and the Pali sutta pitaka?

On a related note, what are the very earliest known references to Mahayana teachings? When scholars estimate the dates that certain teachings developed (i.e. prajnaparamita, tathagatagarbha, the bodhisattva path as distinct from that of the arahant) what do they use to arrive at these dates?

Thanks,

LE

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Indrajala
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Indrajala » Tue Jul 19, 2011 5:44 am

tad etat sarvajñānaṃ karuṇāmūlaṃ bodhicittahetukam upāyaparyavasānam iti |

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Astus
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Astus » Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:39 am

Another book to look into:

The fundamental teachings of early Buddhism: A comparative study based on the Sutranga portion of the Pali Samyutta-Nikaya and the Chinese Samyuktagama by Mun-keat Choong

Also interesting:

Metaphor and Literalism in Buddhism The Doctrinal History of Nirvana by Soon-Il Hwang
Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



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some1
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby some1 » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:08 pm


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Astus
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Astus » Tue Jul 19, 2011 9:06 pm

Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



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Lazy_eye
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Lazy_eye » Wed Jul 20, 2011 5:15 am

Thanks to all of you who replied. It seems one is really going to be limited in exploring this topic without a solid reading knowledge of Chinese. Makes me realize how lucky English-speaking Theravadins are to have Access to Insight.

My interest was sparked by (among other things) these from the agamas. The first one corresponds closely to the Pali Canon's with a notable exception: it includes the formulation "empty of eternal and unchanging nature" which sounds like it came straight out of Nagarjuna.

Wondering if there are similar interesting discrepancies elsewhere, and what they signify -- did something get added into the Chinese version, or taken out of the Pali?

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Indrajala
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Indrajala » Wed Jul 20, 2011 5:55 am

tad etat sarvajñānaṃ karuṇāmūlaṃ bodhicittahetukam upāyaparyavasānam iti |

Jnana
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Jnana » Wed Jul 20, 2011 6:57 am


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Astus
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Astus » Wed Jul 20, 2011 8:22 am

Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



Kyosan
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Kyosan » Sat Jul 23, 2011 1:25 am


Jnana
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Jnana » Sun Jul 31, 2011 8:30 pm

Another short paper by Ven. Anālayo for anyone who really wants to get into some of the minutia of comparative analysis between the collections of the MN & MĀ: .

Jnana
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Jnana » Mon Aug 01, 2011 10:14 am

Also: .

Also of interest: .

:buddha1:

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cdpatton
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby cdpatton » Wed Aug 10, 2011 2:50 am


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Nicholas Weeks
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Nicholas Weeks » Wed Aug 10, 2011 3:14 am

A bodhisattva does not become weary of evil beings nor does he commit the error of bringing forth thoughts inclined to reject them and cast them aside. Avatamsaka Sutra, ch. 25

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cdpatton
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby cdpatton » Wed Aug 10, 2011 4:52 am


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Nicholas Weeks
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Re: Chinese Buddhist canon

Postby Nicholas Weeks » Wed Aug 10, 2011 6:20 am

Fascinating Charlie, many thanks. Cosmology is not in the forefront of Buddhism, so this would be a great text for somebody to translate.
A bodhisattva does not become weary of evil beings nor does he commit the error of bringing forth thoughts inclined to reject them and cast them aside. Avatamsaka Sutra, ch. 25


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