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How do you suppose Karma works the way it does? - Page 2 - Dhamma Wheel

How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
Sanghamitta
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Re: How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

Postby Sanghamitta » Fri Nov 13, 2009 8:40 am

The going for refuge is the door of entrance to the teachings of the Buddha.

Bhikku Bodhi.

Clueless Git
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Re: How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

Postby Clueless Git » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:14 am


pegembara
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Re: How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

Postby pegembara » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:55 am

The principle of Dependent Origination shows the interdependence and interrelation of all things in the form of a continuum. As a continuum, it can be analyzed from a number of different perspectives:

In essence, this general principle corresponds to what is known in Pali as idappaccayata, the principle of conditionality.

A. Imasmim sati idam hoti: When there is this, that is.
Imasuppada idam upajjati: With the arising of this, that arises.

B. Imasmim asati idam na hoti: When this is not, neither is that.
Imassa nirodha idam nirujjhati: With the cessation of this, that ceases. [S.II.28,65]


All things are interrelated and interdependent; all things exist in relation to each other; all things exist dependent on determinants; all things have no enduring existence, not even for a moment; all things have no intrinsic entity; all things are without First Cause, or Genesis.

The functioning of the principle of Dependent Origination applies to all things, both physical and mental, and expresses itself through a number of natural laws. These are:

1. Utuniyama: the natural law pertaining to physical objects and changes in the natural environment, such as the weather; the way flowers bloom in the day and fold up at night; the way soil, water and nutrients help a tree to grow; and the way things disintegrate and decompose. This perspective emphasizes the changes brought about by heat or temperature.
2. Bijaniyama: the natural law pertaining to heredity, which is best described in the adage, "as the seed, so the fruit."
3. Cittaniyama: the natural law pertaining to the workings of the mind, the process of cognition of sense objects and the mental reactions to them.
4. Kammaniyama: the natural law pertaining to human behavior, the process of the generation of action and its results. In essence, this is summarized in the words, "good deeds bring good results, bad deeds bring bad results."
5. Dhammaniyama: the natural law governing the relationship and interdependence of all things: the way all things arise, exist and then cease. All conditions are subject to change, are in a state of affliction and are not self: this is the Norm.

Essentially, kamma is intention (cetana), and this word includes will, choice and decision, the mental impetus which leads to action. Intention is that which instigates and directs all human actions, both creative and destructive, and is therefore the essence of kamma, as is given in the Buddha's words, Cetanaham bhikkhave kammam vadami: Monks! Intention, I say, is kamma. Having willed, we create kamma, through body, speech and mind.

One instance of intention is one instance of kamma. When there is kamma there is immediate result. Even just one little thought, although not particularly important, is nevertheless not void of consequence. It will be at the least a "tiny speck" of kamma, added to the stream of conditions which shape mental activity. With repeated practice, through repeated proliferation by the mind, or through expression as external activity, the result becomes stronger in the form of character traits, physical features or repercussions from external sources.

A destructive intention does not have to be on a gross level. It may, for example, lead to the destruction of only a very small thing, such as when we angrily tear up a piece of paper. Even though that piece of paper has no importance in itself, the action still has some effect on the quality of the mind. The effect is very different from tearing up a piece of paper with a neutral state of mind, such as when throwing away scrap paper. If there is repeated implementation of such angry intention, the effects of accumulation will become clearer and clearer, and may develop to more significant levels.

Consider the specks of dust which come floating unnoticed into a room; there isn't one speck which is void of consequence. It is the same for the mind. But the weight of that consequence, in addition to being dependent on the amount of mental "dust," is also related to the quality of the mind. For instance, specks of dust which alight onto a road surface have to be of a very large quantity before the road will seem to be dirty. Specks of dust which alight onto a floor, although of a much smaller quantity, may make the floor seem dirtier than the road. A smaller amount of dust accumulating on a table top will seem dirty enough to cause irritation. An even smaller amount alighting on a mirror will seem dirty and will interfere with its functioning. A tiny speck of dust on a spectacle lens is perceptible and can impair vision. In the same way, volition or intention, no matter how small, is not void of fruit. As the Buddha said:

"All kamma, whether good or evil, bears fruit. There is no kamma, no matter how small, which is void of fruit."
:namaste:
Last edited by pegembara on Fri Nov 13, 2009 11:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech, & from idle chatter: This is called right speech.

Clueless Git
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Re: How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

Postby Clueless Git » Fri Nov 13, 2009 11:12 am


Sanghamitta
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Re: How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

Postby Sanghamitta » Fri Nov 13, 2009 12:32 pm

As my husband is wont to say, practice as you can, not as you cant. It might be interesting for you at sometime to compare your ideas with what is recorded in the Suttas as well as to experience. You might find some differences as well as some things in common.

:anjali:
The going for refuge is the door of entrance to the teachings of the Buddha.

Bhikku Bodhi.

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Dugu
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Re: How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

Postby Dugu » Fri Nov 13, 2009 7:01 pm


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Lazy_eye
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Re: How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

Postby Lazy_eye » Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:42 pm


Sanghamitta
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Re: How do you suppose Karma works the way it does?

Postby Sanghamitta » Tue Nov 17, 2009 5:10 pm

Its certainly problematic to ascribe particular happenstances to particular causes, all we can really do is point to the teachings which say that this behaviour will have this result, in the case of a particular individual though we simply dont know..
The going for refuge is the door of entrance to the teachings of the Buddha.

Bhikku Bodhi.


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