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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2009 2:17 pm 
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From: The Sutra in 42 Sections
Quote:
http://www.fodian.net/world/0784.html
Section 6: Tolerating Evil-doers and Avoiding Hatred
The Buddha said, "When an evil person hears about your goodness and intentionally comes to cause trouble, you should restrain yourself and not become angry or blame him. Then the one who has come to do evil will do evil to himself. "
Section 7: Evil Returns to the Doer
The Buddha said, "There was a person who, upon hearing that I observe the Way and practice great humane kindness, intentionally came to berate me. I was silent and did not reply. When he finished abusing me, I asked,
'If you are courteous to people and they do not accept your courtesy, the courtesy returns to you, does it not? '
"It does, 'he replied. I said, now you are scolding me, but I do not receive it, so the misfortune returns to you and must remain with you. It is as inevitable as an echo that follows a sound, or as a shadow that follows a form.
In the end you cannot avoid it. Therefore, be careful not to do evil. '"
Section 8: Abusing Others Defiles Oneself
The Buddha said, "An evil person who harms a sage is like one who raises his head and spits at heaven. Instead of reaching heaven, the spittle falls back on him. It is the same with someone who throws dust against the wind. Instead of going somewhere else, the dust returns to defile his own body. The Sage can not be harmed.
Misdeeds will inevitably destroy the doer. "
Section 9: By Returning to the Source, You Find the Way
The Buddha said, "Deep learning and a love of the Way make the Way difficult to attain. When you guard your mind and revere the Way, the Way is truly great! "
Section 14: Asking about Goodness and Greatness
A Shramana asked the Buddha, "What is goodness? What is the foremost greatness? "
The Buddha said: "To practice the Way and uphold the truth is goodness. To unite your will with the Way is greatness."
Section 16: Casting Aside Love and Attaining the Way
The Buddha said, "People who cherish love and desire do not see the Way. Just as when you stir clear water with your hand, those who stand beside it cannot see their reflections, so, too, people who are entangled in love and desire have turbidity in their minds, and therefore they cannot see the Way.
You Shramanas should cast aside love and desire. When the stains of love and desire disappear, you will be able to see the Way. "
Section 20: Realize that the Self Is Truly Empty
The Buddha said, "You should be mindful of the four elements within the body. Though each has a name, none of them is the self. Since they are not the self, they are like an illusion. "
Section 22: Wealth and Sex Cause Suffering
The Buddha said, "People are unable to renounce wealth and sex. They are just like a child who cannot resist honey on the blade of a knife. Even though the amount is not even enough for a single meal serving , he will lick it and risk cutting his tongue in the process. "
Section 24: Sexual Desire Obstructs the Way
The Buddha said, "Of all longings and desires, there is none as strong as sex. Sexual desire has no equal. Fortunately, it is one of a kind. If there were something else like it, no one in the entire world would be able to cultivate the Way. "
Section 25: The Fire of Desire Burns
The Buddha said, "Person with love and desire is like one who carries a torch while walking against the wind: he is certain to burn his hand. "
Section 28: Don't Indulge the Wild Mind
The Buddha said, "Be careful not to believe your own mind; your mind is not to be believed. Be careful not to get involved with sex; involvement with sex leads to disaster. After you have attained Arhatship, you can believe your own mind. "
Section 31: When the Mind Is Still, Desire Is Dispelled
The Buddha said, "There was once someone who was plagued by ceaseless sexual desire and wished to castrate himself. The Buddha said to him,"To cut off your sexual organ would not be as good as to cut off your mind. Your mind is like a supervisor: if the supervisor stops, his employees will also quit. If the deviant mind is not stopped, what good does it do to cut off the organ? '"
The Buddha spoke a verse for him:
"Desire is born from your intentions.
Intentions are born from thoughts.
When both aspects of the mind are still,
There is neither form nor activity."
The Buddha said, this verse was spoken by the Buddha Kashyapa. "
Section 38: Birth Leads to Death
The Buddha asked a Shramana, "How long is the human life span? " He replied, "Few days." The Buddha said, "You have not yet understood the Way. "
He asked another Shramana, "How long is the human life span? " The reply was, "The space of a meal." The Buddha said, "You have not yet understood the Way. "
He asked another Shramana, "How long is the human life span? " He replied, "The length of a single breath." The Buddha said, "Excellent. You have understood the Way. "
Section 40: The Way Is Practiced in the Mind
The Buddha said, "Shramana who practices the Way should not be like an ox turning a millstone. Such a one walks the Way with his body, but his mind is not on the Way. If the mind is concentrated on the Way, what further need is there to practice? "

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2009 3:06 pm 
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Continuation...
From The Diamond Sutra
Quote:
http://community.palouse.net/lotus/diamondsutra.htm
"Subhuti, what do you think? Has the Tathagata attained the Consummation of Incomparable Enlightenment?
Has the Tathagata a teaching to enunciate?"
Subhuti answered: "As I understand Buddha's meaning there is no formulation of truth called Consummation of Incomparable Enlightenment. Moreover, the Tathagata has no formulated teaching to enunciate. Wherefore? Because the Tathagata has said that truth is uncontainable and inexpressible. It neither is nor is it not.
Thus it is that this unformulated Principle is the foundation of the different systems of all the sages.

Then Buddha said: "Subhuti, however many living beings there are in all those Buddha-lands, though they have manifold modes of mind, the Tathagata understands them all. Wherefore? Because the Tathagata teaches that all these are not Mind; they are merely called "mind". Subhuti, it is impossible to retain past mind, impossible to hold on to present mind, and impossible to grasp future mind."

"Subhuti, what do you think? May the Tathagata be perceived by the thirty-two marks [of a great man]?"
Subhuti answered: "No, the Tathagata may not be perceived thereby."
Then Buddha said: "Subhuti, if the Tathagata may be perceived by such marks, any great imperial ruler is the same as the Tathagata."
Subhuti then said to Buddha: "World-honored One, as I understand the meaning of Buddha's words, the Tathagata may not be perceived by the thirty-two marks."
Whereupon the World-honored One uttered this verse:
"Who sees Me by form,
Who seeks Me in sound,
Perverted are his footsteps upon the Way,
For he cannot perceive the Tathagata."

"Subhuti, if anyone should say that Buddha declares any conception of egoity (self) do you consider he would understand my teaching correctly?"
"No, World-honored One, such a man would not have any sound understanding of the Tathagata's teaching, because the World-honored One declares that notions of selfhood, personality, entity and separate individuality, as really existing, are erroneous - these terms are merely figures of speech."

"Now in what manner may he explain them to others?
By detachment from appearances - abiding in Real Truth. -
So I tell you - Thus shall ye think of all this fleeting world:
"A star at dawn, a bubble in a stream;
A flash of lightning in a summer cloud,
A flickering lamp, a phantom, and a dream."

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


Last edited by thornbush on Sat Apr 11, 2009 8:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2009 3:16 pm 
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Continuation...
From: The Eight Great Awakenings Sutra
Quote:
http://www2.fodian.net/Picture/BaoKu/20 ... 651987.htm
The First Awakening:
The world is impermanent. Countries are perilous and fragile. The body is a source of pain, ultimately empty. The five skandhas are not the true self. Life and Death is nothing but a series of transformations—hallucinatory, unreal, uncontrollable. The intellect is a wellspring of turpitude, the body a breeding ground of offenses. Investigate and contemplate these truths. Gradually break free of death and rebirth.

The Second Awakening:
Too much desire brings pain. Death and rebirth are wearisome ordeals, originating from our thoughts of greed and lust. By lessening desires we can realize absolute truth and enjoy peace, freedom, and health in body and mind.

The Third Awakening:
Our minds are never satisfied or content with just enough. The more we obtain, the more we want. Thus we create offenses and perform evil deeds. Bodhisattvas don’t wish to make these mistakes. Instead, they choose to be content. They nurture the Way, living a quiet life in humble surroundings—their sole occupation, cultivating wisdom.

The Fourth Awakening:
Idleness and self-indulgence are the downfall of people. With unflagging vigor, great people break through their afflictions and baseness. They vanquish and defeat the four kinds of demons, and escape from the prison of the five skandhas.

The Fifth Awakening:
Stupidity and ignorance are the cause of death and rebirth. Bodhisattvas apply themselves and deeply appreciate study and erudition, constantly striving to expand their wisdom and refine their eloquence. Nothing brings them greater joy than teaching and transforming living beings.

The Sixth Awakening:
Suffering in poverty breeds deep resentment. Wealth unfairly distributed creates ill-will and conflict among people. Thus, Bodhisattvas practice giving. They treat friend and foe alike. They do not harbor grudges or despise amoral people.

The Seventh Awakening:
The five desires are a source of offenses and grief. Truly great people, laity included, are not blighted by worldly pleasures. Instead, they aspire to don the three-piece precept robe and the blessing bowl of monastic life.
Their ultimate ambition is to leave the home life and to cultivate the Path with impeccable purity.
Their virtuous qualities are lofty and sublime; their attitude towards all creatures, kind and compassionate.

The Eighth Awakening:
Like a blazing inferno, birth and death are plagued with suffering and affliction. Therefore, great people resolve to cultivate the Great Vehicle, to rescue all beings, to endure hardship on behalf of others, and to lead everyone to ultimate happiness.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 8:13 am 
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Continuation...
Some excerpts from Chapter 40, The Avatamsaka Sutra: "ON ENTERING THE INCONCEIVABLE STATE OF LIBERATION THROUGH THE PRACTICES AND VOWS OF THE BODHISATTVA SAMANTABHADRA"
Quote:
http://www.geocities.com/cobinri/samantabhadra.html
The Kumara Sudhana said to the Bodhisattva Samantabhadra:
"What course shall we follow, O Holy One, to fulfil all these virtues, from "rendering homage to Buddhas" to "turning over one's own merits" to all beings?"
The Bodhisattva Samantabhadra replied to the Kumara Sudhana:

(1) To pay the highest homage and respect to all Buddhas.
"O Noble-minded Man, as to what is said regarding the "homage and respect of the Buddhas", it means that by the power of the Virtues and the Vows of the Bodhisattva Samantabhadra, I ("I" means any person) have profound faith and deep understanding, as though I were face to face simultaneously with all the Buddhas of all the Buddha-Worlds (such Buddhas) equal to the (flying) smallest dust-motes in number, throughout the worlds of Dharma and the empty space of the ten directions and the three periods of time. I worship and adore them constantly with my pure deeds viz. the bodily, vocal, and mental deeds."
My homage will end when the limitation of infinite space is ended, as the space is boundless, so also is my homage to the Buddhas without end.
So is it, when the spheres of beings are ended, the karmas of beings are ended, the sorrows of beings (klesa) are ended, these too are endless: even so is my homage to all the Buddhas endless. Thought following upon thought without interruption, and in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds without weariness.

(2) To preach (the virtue of) and to praise (the glory of) the Tathagatas
"O Noble-minded Man, what signifies "to preach (the virtues of) and to praise (the glories of) the Tathagatas"? It means that in the smallest dust-motes of all the worlds of the ten directions, and the three periods of time throughout the Dharma-circles and the empty space, upon each speck of dust, there the Buddhas are dwelling, equal in number to the smallest specks of dust of all the worlds.
And each Buddha is surrounded by an assembly of Bodhisattvas, as wide as the ocean.

I shall apply my profound insight and my temporal knowledge to fathom them till I thoroughly understand, then will I praise them with my oration, as though it was with the angelic and eloquent tongues of the Goddess (Sarasvati). Each tongue emitting a boundless ocean of all forms of sound, each voice emitting a boundless ocean of all forms of speech, proclaiming the ocean of the merits of all Tathagatas. Such praises shall continue without cessation through endless time and the limitless realms of the Dharma-Worlds.

My praises will cease when the void of space is ended, (or) the spheres of beings are ended, (or) the karmas of beings are ended, (or) the sorrows of beings are ended. But all the things from the void of space even to the sorrows of beings are endless: so also are my praises endless; thought succeeding thought without interruption; and in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds without weariness."

(3) To make abundant offerings for the veneration to the Buddhas.
O Noble-minded Man, what is meant by "abundant offerings out of veneration to the Buddhas"? It means that in the smallest dust-motes of the Buddha-domains of the Dharma-circles and of empty space, and of the ten directions and three periods of time, in each speck of dust exists the Buddhas, equal in number to the smallest dust-motes of all worlds.
Each Buddha is surrounded by an ocean-wide assembly of Bodhisattvas, in whom, I have profound faith and reverent understanding through the power of the Vows of the Bodhisattva Samantabhadra.
I will offer them the most rare and wondrous gifts such as the flowery-clouds, garland-clouds, heavenly music-clouds, celestial tapestry-clouds, angelic garment-clouds; all kinds of heavenly perfumes, scented balms, aromatic incenses, aromatic powders, each equal in quantity to Mount Sumeru (the king of mountains).
I will present lighted lamps of various kinds, such as the cream lamps, the oil lamps, and the lamps of sweet perfumes. The wick of each lamp being in size as Mount Sumeru, and the burning oil of each as great as the water of the ocean. Ceaselessly will I offer such gifts, in veneration.
O Noble-minded Man, among all gifts, the crown of them is the gifts of Dharma. Such gifts are called: the offering of "Following the instructions (of all Buddhas), the offering of benefits for all beings, the offering of taking upon oneself the suffering of others, the offering of fostering the root of merit diligently, the offering of swerving not, from the Bodhisattva vows; and the offering of departing not, from the love of the Bodhicitta."
O Noble-minded Man, truly the merit to be derived from the offering of (material) gifts, such as those enumerated, are infinite; yet, in comparison with a single thought of Dharma (they are as nothing).
Those merits (derived from material offerings), would not be equal to a hundredth part (of the merit of a thought of Dharma); nay, not to a hundred thousandth part of koties, of nayutas, of kalans, and of upannishads.
And why? Because the Dharma is held in the highest esteem by all the Tathagatas. Moreover, all Buddhas are begotten from the Dharma, through the perfecting of their conduct in accordance with it. If the Bodhisattvas make offering to the Dharma (to the Buddhas) then their offerings to the Tathagatas are completed.
Thus do the Bodhisattvas present the truest offering of gifts to the Tathagatas.
My offering of such great and noble gifts to the Buddhas will only cease if the void of space is ended, (or) the spheres of beings are ended, (or) the karmas of beings are ended, (or) the sorrows of beings are ended. But as all the things from the void of space to the sorrows of all beings are endless; so also will my offering to Buddhas endless. Thought succeeding thought without interruption, in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds without weariness.

(4) To repent and confess one's evil deeds and evil karma.
"O Noble-minded Man, what is meant by "repenting and confessing one's evil deeds and evil karma"?
A Bodhisattva would think thus: 'All the evil deeds I have committed hitherto during the Kalpas without beginning of the past, caused by the emotion of lust, hatred, and stupidity leading to bodily, speech, and mental actions are boundless.
If such deeds were corporeal and in forms, all the empty spaces unlimited as it is, could not contains them.
I now confess and repent them all, by my three purified deeds of body, speech, and mind, and with a sincere heart, pledging myself not to commit any evil deed here-after.
I will always keep myself pure in the prohibitive precepts, and in all active moral deeds.'

I will lay this repentance before all the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas of all worlds and Dharma-circles equal in number to the smallest dust-motes.
My repentance will cease when the void of space is ended, (or) the spheres of beings are ended, (or) the karmas of beings are ended, (or) the sorrows of beings are all ended.
But as all the things from the void of the space to the sorrows of beings are endless, so also is my repentance endless.
Thought succeeding thought without interruption, in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds without weariness."

(5) To approve of and rejoice at the merits and virtues of others.
"O Noble-minded Man, What is meant by "approving of and rejoicing at the merits and virtues of others"?
In Buddha lands, the Buddhas, equal in number to the smallest dust-motes of all the worlds, throughout all the Dharma-circles and empty space, of the ten directions and three periods of time, have devoted their lives to the sole purpose of acquiring all wisdom, and diligently accumulating merit.
Since they began to direct their minds (toward Bodhicitta), throughout the duration of unutterable and innumerable kalpas and in Buddha-domains, equal in number to the smallest dust-motes of all worlds.
During each Kalpa, having sacrificed their heads, eyes, hands, and feet, in unutterable and incalculable number as the smallest dust-motes of Buddha-spheres, having thus overcome all difficulties, and accomplished all the arduous tasks, perfected the various stages of paramitas, passing through the experiences of the Bodhisattva-wisdom, and accomplished the highest Bodhi of Buddhas till entered into Parinirvana, whereupon they distributed the sariras.
All such good roots of merit I emulate and rejoice in.
Moreover, whatever merit or virtue may be possessed by any being either, of the six realms of existence, or belonging to the four kinds of birth, or belonging to any species of life in the worlds of the ten directions, though such merit may be as infinitesimal as a grain of dust, all will have my support and corresponding regard. With all such I rejoice.
Again, all the Sravakas, the Pratyeka-Buddhas, Arhats, and those who are still to be advanced on the path of discipline, all such are the saints of the ten directions and the three periods of time, with whom I rejoice at their merit if any may be possessed.
All the Bodhisattvas who through infinite self-sacrifice and boundless achievement have overcome all obstacles and having formed the wish to attain the highest goal of Bodhi, with them also I rejoice in their vast merits.
Thus, even though the void of space, together with the states of beings, with the karmas of beings, with the sorrows of beings, though all these be ended, yet, my approval and joy in the merits of all beings will not be ended. Thought succeeding thought without interruption, in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds without weariness."

(6) To request the Buddhas to set in motion "The Wheel of Dharma"
"O Noble-minded Man, what is meant by requesting the Buddhas to set in motion "the Wheel of Dharma"?
It means that I will apply my bodily, speech, and mental efforts, and various expedient means, and the most skilful methods, earnestly to request the Buddhas to rotate the wondrous Wheel of Dharma.
Such Buddhas are incalculable in number as the smallest (flying) dust-motes of the Buddha-domains of the ten directions, and the three periods of time, throughout the Dharma-realms and the empty space; each dust-motes respectively contains therein unutterable and innumerable vast Buddha lands, equal in number to the smallest dust-motes. In each country dwell innumerable and ineffable Buddhas equal to the smallest dust-motes in number.
Each moment there are Buddhas, equal to the smallest dust-motes in number, who are attaining enlightenment, and each are surrounded by an ocean-wide assembly of all Bodhisattvas.
I constantly request such Buddhas to turn the Wheel of Right Dharma.
Thus, even though the space of void has ended, and likewise the states of beings, the karmas of beings, and the sorrows of beings, all have ended, yet my request is endless. Thought succeeding thought without interruption, and in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds, without weariness."

(7) To request the Buddhas to remain in the world
O Noble-minded Man, what is meant by "requesting the Buddhas to remain in the world"?
"The Buddhas are infinite in number as the minutest dust-motes of the ten directions and three periods of time throughout the Dharma-realms and empty space; and so are the Bodhisattvas, the Sravakas, the Pratyeka-Buddhas, the Arhat, the partly learned ones, and the well learned laymen, when they set their minds on the attainment of Nirvana; I entreat them all to remain in touch with living beings, instead of entering Nirvana; even to the duration of kalpas of Buddha lands, equal to the minutest dust-motes in number, in order to benefit all living beings.
Thus even though the void of space has ended, and likewise the states of beings, the karmas of beings, and the sorrows of beings, though all such have ended, yet, my request to the Buddhas is endless.
Thought succeeds thought without interruption, and in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds, without weariness."

(8) To be faithful follower of "The Teaching of the Buddhas" forever
"O Noble-minded Man, what is meant by being "Under Buddhas' guidance forever"? It means, for instance, the Buddha Sakyamuni, who was the vehicle for the power of Tathagata Vairocana of the Saha-World, who from the beginning, when He made an earnest wish (for obtaining Buddhahood, in order to deliver all beings), and having made the exquisite advance by continuous skilful exertion, and sacrificed of His lives and bodies, in unutterable and countless number, for the sake of almsgiving. He stripped off His own skin for paper, used His own blood for link, and His bones for writing-instruments. Thus the scripture have been written in bulk as great as Mount Sumeru. In appreciation of the Dharma, He would disregard the royal thrones, kingdoms, palaces, gardens, and all that belonged to Him.
He spared no energy in his arduous and painstaking career, until He accomplished the great Bodhi under the sacred Bodhi Tree.
Then He displayed various exalted powers (Abhidjnas), manifested various transmutations, revealed various Buddha-figures of the three kayas, and presided at the various assemblies; such as the assemblies of Great Bodhisattvas, the assemblies of Sravakas and Pratyeka-Buddhas, the assemblies of cakravarti (world rulers) and petty kings (scattered corn kings) and their retinues, the assemblies of kshatriya (warrior-statesmen), brahmin, elders, and laymen, the assemblies of devas (gods), nagas (dragon), eight divisions of supernatural beings, human, and non-human.
At these assemblies and sanctuaries, He spoke with the full and round voice of thunder, with expedient means and skilful methods, teaching the beings in manner befitting their inclinations and happiness.
Thus He led them to the maturity (or Bodhi), until He entered into Nirvana.
All these examples I will follow, not only that of the present World-Honoured One Vairocana, but of all the Tathagatas of the Buddha lands, equal in number to the dust-motes of the ten directions and three periods of time, throughout the Dharma-realms and empty space. I will follow the examples of the Buddhas from thought to thought.
Even though the void of space has ended, and the worlds of beings, the karmas of beings, the sorrows of beings all have ended, yet, my practice and following of the examples of the Buddhas will not be ended.
Thought succeeds thought without interruption, and in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds, without weariness."

(9) To be always in harmony with all beings (bestowing on them gifts according to their needs)
"O Noble-minded Man, what is meant by "Always in harmony with beings"?
It means always accommodate and benefit all living beings of the worlds of ten directions and three periods of time, throughout the Dharma-circles and empty space; they are known as the beings to be born from the womb, form the egg, from moisture, and produced by metamorphosis.
They live in different elements, either abiding on earth, in the water, in the fire (that is heat), or in the wind (air).
There are also some beings dwelling in space, living in forests and bushes.
They are of various species, forms, appearances, life-spans, names, natures, knowledge, habits, characteristics, manners, costumes, and diets.
They dwell at innumerable abiding places; in towns, villages, cities, and palaces.
They comprise the devas, the nagas, the eight divisions of supernatural beings, human, and non-humans; some have no feet, some two feet, some four feet, and others have many feet; some are with form, some without form; with sense, or neither with or without sense.
All of these shall be accommodated and served by me (according to their needs and their natures), as attentively as I would show filial respect to my parents, due respect to my teachers, to elders, and arhats, up to the Tathagata, all in equality.
A Bodhisattva should thus benefit all beings in equal treatment, and bestow his loving care on all beings alike. And why? Because if a Bodhisattva serves all beings that is equal to serving the Buddhas dutifully.
To hold all beings in high esteem, and render them respectful services, that is equal to revering and serving the Tathagatas.
To make all beings happy, is to please all Tathagatas. And why?
Because the Great Compassionate Heart is the essence of Buddhahood. For the sake of (delivering) all beings, (the Bodhisattva) develop Great Compassion, and from the Great Compassion spring the Bodhicitta, and from Bodhicitta comes the Enlightenment.
Look upon all beings with impartial mind and equality, thus will the Great Compassion be brought to the state of fullness and completion.
To bestow the Great Compassion upon all beings, that is equal to serving the Tathagatas (to their satisfaction).
My compassionate embrace of all beings shall never cease.
Even though void of space has ended, the worlds of beings, the karmas of beings, and the sorrows of beings are all ended, yet, my boundless compassion is endless. Thought succeeds thought without interruption, and in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds, without weariness."

(10) To dedicate all of one's merits to (benefit) all beings
"O Noble-minded Man, what signifies "Dedicating all one's merits (to benefit all sentient beings)"?
This means that all one's merits acquired from the first vow of paying the highest homage and respect to all Buddhas, up to and including the vow to dedicating all one's merit to all beings.
All these shall be transferred to all beings throughout the Dharma-worlds and immeasurable spaces of the universe, wishing them to be constantly peaceful and happy without sickness or suffering.
I will see all beings' evil projects fail, and all their virtuous intentions will be quickly achieved.
I will close the door against evil destinies, and open the right paths of Nirvana to men and devas.
If the beings are suffering the most terrible tortures in expiation of their accumulated evil doings, I will substitute myself and take upon myself the sufferings that their evil deeds have brought upon them, so shall they be released (from their evil deeds), and finally attain the supreme Bodhi.
Thus do all the Bodhisattvas devote themselves to the cultivation of virtue and merit, and dedicate all the rewards over to the benefit of all beings (in this way).
My loving embrace of all beings is eternal.
Even though the void of space has ended, (or) the worlds of beings, (or) the karmas of beings, (or) the sorrows of beings all have ended, yet my compassion for all beings, by turning over my rewards of merit to them is endless.
Thought succeeds thought without interruption, and in bodily, vocal, and mental deeds, without weariness.
Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2009 7:43 am 
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Continuation...
Excerpts From: The Larger Amitayus Sutra
Quote:
http://buddhistfaith.tripod.com/purelan ... s/id3.html
"Wherever the Buddha comes to stay, there is no state, town or village which is not blessed by his virtues.
The whole country reposes in peace and harmony.
The sun and the moon shine with pure brilliance; wind rises and rain falls at the right time.
There is no calamity or epidemic, and so the country becomes wealthy, and its people enjoy peace.
Soldiers and weapons become useless; and people esteem virtue, practice benevolence and diligently
cultivate courteous modesty."

The Buddha continued, "My concern for you, devas and humans, is greater than the care of parents for their children.
I have become a Buddha in this world, destroyed the five evils, removed the five sufferings, and extinguished
the five burnings.
I have countered evil with good, eradicated the suffering of birth-and-death, and enabled people to acquire the five virtues and attain the peace of unconditioned Nirvana."

"The reality of birth-and-death is such that the sorrow of parting is mutually felt by all generations.
A father cries over the death of his children;
children cry over the death of their father.
Brothers, sisters, husbands and wives mourn each other's death.
According to the basic law of impermanence, whether death will occur in order of seniority or in the reverse is
unpredictable.
All things must pass.
Nothing stays forever.
Few believe this, even if someone teaches and exhorts them.
And so the stream of birth-and-death continues everlastingly."

The Buddha said to the Bodhisattva Maitreya and to devas and humans,
"I have told you the truth about people of the world.
Such being their mode of life, they are unable to enter on the Way.
Therefore, you should think deeply and try to avoid various evil acts; choose the good and diligently practice it.
A life of addiction to desires or a life of pomp and vain glory cannot last long.
All must part; there is nothing you can truly enjoy.
Since you have encountered a Buddha in this world, you should assiduously practice the Way.

The Buddha said to Maitreya,
"What you say is true. Those who adore and revere a Buddha attain great merit.
Buddhas very rarely appear in the world.
Having become a Buddha in this life, I have taught the Dharma, expounded teachings of the Way, cleared people's doubts, eradicated the causes of lust and desire, and blocked the source of all evils.
Visiting various places in the three worlds, I encounter no obstructions.
The wisdom disclosed in the scriptures provides for all ways of life.
It keeps essential principles together and clearly reveals the truth.
I have explained the reality of the five realms, thereby freeing those who have not yet attained deliverance and
distinguishing between the paths of Samsara and Nirvana.

"It is time for all to seek deliverance from the pains of birth, death, old age, and sickness.
Outflows of depravity and defilement are everywhere, and there is nothing in which you can find true joy.
You should resolutely do worthy deeds with decorum, strive to do more good, control and purify yourselves,
wash off the mind's defilements, be sincere in word and deed, and allow no contradiction between what you think and what you do.
Seek your own emancipation and then turn to saving others..."

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 4:45 am 
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Continuation...
From:The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
http://www.buddhistdoor.com/OldWeb/reso ... utra.htm#1
Thus have I heard. Once upon a time Sakyamuni, The Enlightened One, was staying in a park called Karanda Bamboo Grove, near Rajagriha City. He held a meeting with thirty six thousand men including great monks, Bodhisattvas, Mahasattvas and the eight groups of supernatural beings. On that occasion, there were five hundred Brahmans in the assembly. One of them rose from his seat and said to Sakyamuni, the Buddha:

"We have learned that Buddhism is so profound that there is no parallel to it. So we have come to ask you to explain it to us."

"Very well," The Enlightened One said.

"Is the universe existent or non-existent?" The Brahman asked.

"It is both existent and non-existent," the Enlightened one replied.

The Brahman said, "How can you say non-existent of what is now existent? How can you say existent of what is now non-existent?"

The Enlightened One replied, "The living say it is existent, but the dead say it is non-existent. Consequently, I say it is both existent and non-existent."

He asked, "What does man live on?"

The Enlightened One replied, "Man lives on cereals."

He asked, "Where do the five cereals come from?"

"They come from the four elements, fire, wind, water and earth," The Enlightened One replied.

"Where do the four elements come from?" the Brahman asked.

"They come from void." The Enlightened One replied.

"Where does the void come from?" He asked.

"It comes from nothingness." The Enlightened One replied.

"Where does nothingness come from?" He asked.

"From the nature." The Enlightened One replied.

"Where does nature come from?" He asked.

"From Nirvana." The Enlightened One replied.

"Where does Nirvana come from?" He asked.

"Why do you ask about such profound things. Nirvana is the law of non-birth and immortality." The Enlightened One replied.

"Have you attained Nirvana?" He asked.

"I haven't reached Nirvana yet." The Enlightened One replied.

"If you haven't reached Nirvana yet, how do you know Nirvana is an eternal bliss?" He asked.

"Now let me ask you whether the life of the sentient beings in the world is happy or miserable," the Enlightened One said.

"I view it as very miserable." He replied.

"What do you mean by miserable?" The Enlightened One said.

"After seeing all the dying men whose pains are unbearable. I know death is miserable." He replied.

"Now you are not dead, nevertheless, you know death is miserable. I have seen all Buddhas of the ten directions in space having neither rebirth nor death. I know, therefore, Nirvana is an eternal bliss." The Enlightened One said.

Those five hundred Brahmans were satisfied and thus understood what the Enlightened One had said. They were then willing to accept the five commandments and asked to be disciples of Gauthama Buddha. Finally, they obtained enlightenment of the Sotapanna's degree. They sat down as before. The Enlightened One said, "You all listen carefully to me. I'll give you an extensive talk of fables."


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 4:47 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
THE STUPID MAN TAKES SALT
Once upon a time there was a stupid man who went to another man's home. The host gave him something to eat. After he complained that the food was insipid, the host added a little salt to it. The stupid guest tried again, found it better, and thought that it was tasteful, because of the salt. To his thinking, the food would be so much better, if he took a great deal of salt. Then this stupid and ignorant man ate it on an empty stomach. Afterwards, he had his palate out of order and fell ill.

The heretics, having learned that abstaining from food and drink might lead to the path of Enlightenment, immediately fasted for seven or fifteen days. They merely got fatigued and famished, accomplishing nothing in terms of Enlightenment. Those heretics are just like that stupid man, who, on account of the pleasant flavor that the salt enhanced, ate salt on an empty stomach only to lose all tastes (and get sick afterwards).

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 1:54 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:

THE STUPID MAN STORES UP MILK
Once upon a time there was a stupid man who was about to give a party. He wanted to store up milk for his guests.

"If I milk the cow beforehand every day, he thought, little by little, there will be too much of milk and will not be enough space to store it and it may even spoil. It would be better to let it remain inside of the cow. I'll milk the cow right away at the time of the party."

He then separated the cow from the calf and tied them up apart. A month later, he actually gave the reception. He tried to milk the cow, but the milk had run dry. Some guests got annoyed and others laughed at him.

So are the idiotic fellows who want to give alms at once but prefer to wait until they possess great wealth. It usually happens that, before they can scrape together enough money, it is seized by the country officers or taken away by robbers and thieves or by fire and flood. It also happens that, due to their sudden demise, they are not in time for giving alms.

This is just like the story of the stupid man who stored up milk.


Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:12 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
THE HEAD IS BROKEN WITH PEARS
Once upon a time there was a bald-headed man who was bit in his head by a few pears thrown at him. He forbore taking the blows without knowing that he should have tried to dodge them. A bystander asked the man, "Why didn't you dodge the blows that wounded your head?"

The man answered, "Proudly relying upon doing violence to others and being short of intelligence, he, the attacker, took my baldhead for a stone. That's why he struck me with pears and broke my head like that."

The bystander retorted, "It's you who are indeed short of intelligence. How can you call him stupid? Haven't you been stupid enough to get injured without the sense to run away?"

So is the monk who, unable to abide discipline, meditation and wisdom, keeps only a good appearance to expect support. He is just like that stupid man who got as far as wounded on the head without knowing to run away and called the attacker stupid into the bargain.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 7:56 am 
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Continuation....
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
THE WIFE PRETENDS TO BE DEAD
Once upon a time there was a stupid man who loved very much his beautiful wife. However, she had no true love for him. In the meantime, she associated herself surreptitiously with another man. Burning with lecherous passions, she wanted to leave her husband to be with her lover. She secretly told an old woman, "After my departure, I would like you to place a woman's corpse in my house. You then tell my husband that I'm dead."

The old woman did what she was told. She told the husband shortly after his return that his wife passed away. He went to see the corpse and believed it was that of his own wife. He grieved and wept bitterly. He gathered a great deal of wood and oil together for the cremation. Then he put the ashes into a bag and had it with him day and night.

Shortly after, the wife got tired of her lover. She came back and told her husband, "I'm your wife."

The husband answered, "My wife died a long time ago. Who are you to lie to me that you are my wife?"

The husband refused to believe her, in spite of her repeated explanations.

So are the heretics who, having learned the heretical doctrine, confusedly stick to it with all their soul and take the doctrine to be the right one without altering their mind forever. Thus they will be unable to believe, accept or keep any other creed even it is an orthodox one.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 5:50 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
GETTING THIRSTY ON SEEING WATER
Once there was a fellow desperately in need of water for his thirst. On seeing the blazing fog, he mistook it for water. He pursued it until he reached the Indus River. But he only looked at it without drinking. A bystander asked, "You are suffering from thirst. How that you have found water, why don't you drink it?"

The fellow answered, "If I could drink up all that water, I would do it. Since there is more water than I can finish, I would rather not drink it at all."

As soon as people heard this, they laughed aloud at him. The heretics, acting against all senses and reasons, think since they are unable to keep all the Buddhist commandments, they refuse to accept any of them. They will never attain the path of Enlightenment and thus subject to transmigration in time to come. They are just like that stupid thirsty fellow who gets laughed at by his contemporaries.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 5:39 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
THE DEAD SON IS ABOUT TO REMAIN IN THE HOUSE
Once upon a time there was a man who brought up seven boys, one of whom died. Finding the son dead, he intended to leave the body in the house and moved out himself. A bystander said to him, "You know the living and the dead go separate ways. Since your son is dead, he should be quickly buried in a far away place with all due solemnity. Now why do you want to leave your house and let your dead son remain here?"

When the man heard this, he decided to bury his son and not let the corpse lie at home. He then thought he would have to kill another son to hang one body on each end of the pole to keep in equilibrium and carry them for burial in a long way off the forest. That seemed the only thing possible for him to do and he did it. His contemporaries laughed aloud at his unprecedented eccentricities.

A monk, who secretly broke one commandment, felt afraid to confess it. He would pretend that he had scrupulously kept all commandments and led a life free from evil and defilement.

Some wise men might then tell him, "A monk should keep the commandments just like brilliant pearls should be protected from being damaged. How can you break what you have accepted? Now you are reluctant to confess them."

The offender would answer, "Now that I have to confess, I might as well do more breakings. Then I'll confess all my sins at once."

Consequently, he broke more commandments by doing many evil things before his confession. This monk is just like that stupid man who kills another son when one dies.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:10 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
ONE RECKONS ANOTHER MAN TO BE ONE'S ELDER BROTHER
Once upon a time, there was a man endowed with a respectable appearance and intelligence as well as wealth. All these evoked feelings of admiration and praise from the people around him. Another man then claimed this man to be his elder brother. He did so, because of the man's wealth. When he needed money, he called the man elder brother. After the rich man paying his debt, he stopped calling him elder brother. A bystander asked, "You are a strange man. When you are in need of money, you call him elder brother. When he is in debt, you will not. Why?"

The man answered, "When I want to get at his money, I'll call him elder brother. As a matter of fact, he isn't my own elder brother. When he is in debt, I will not call him elder brother."

Hearing these words, people laughed at him.

The heretics, who have heard the good words of Buddhism, purloin and make use of them as their own. When people try to teach them how to practice the goods words, they do not want to listen. They declared that they use the good words of Buddhism to instruct the other people in order to earn a living. There is no need that they should bother to know how to practice it.

Those heretics are just like the stupid man who calls the rich man elder brother for his money.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 6:15 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
A RUSTIC STEALS CLOTHES FROM THE PALACE TREASURY
Once upon a time there was a rustic who stole garments from the palace and then escaped to a remote place. The king sent men to search for him in all directions. Finally, he was arrested and taken to the king who accused him of theft and asked him where he had got the clothes. The rustic answered that they belonged to his grandfather. The king then ordered him to put them on. He did not know how to wear them. He put on his arms what should be worn on his legs. What he ought to have on his waist, he put on his head. Seeing this, the king summoned his ministers for consultation on the matter.

"If the clothes belonged to your grandfather, you should know how to wear them. How can you wear them in all wrong ways? It's certain that they are not your old clothes. You have stolen them," said the king.

Figuratively speaking, here the king is like Buddha; the valuable clothes, the Buddhist teachings; the stupid rustic, the heretic.

A heretic, who has eavesdropped on Buddhism, makes it for his own. He then misinterprets it, because he does not know the real meaning of its teachings.

This heretic is like the rustic who stole the king's valuable clothes without knowing how to wear them properly and put them on in all the wrong ways.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 2:45 am 
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Continuation....
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
THE FATHER'S VIRTUES ARE PRAISED
Once upon a time there was a man who praised his father's virtues before everybody.

"My father is compassionate. He neither kills nor steals. He speaks earnestly and gives alms," said the man.

At the time, it so happened that a stupid man heard those words and declared, "My father is more virtuous than yours."

The others asked, "In what way he is more virtuous'! Please tell us about him."

The man answered, "Undefiled as my father was, he gave up completely his sexual desires when he was young".

The others said, "If your father had done so, how could he have brought you into the world?"

This aroused the sardonical laugh from all those around him.

There are those ignorant people in the world who want to extol the merits of others without knowing how to be realistic and get ridiculed instead. These people are just like that stupid man who wanted to praise his father but turned out to speak fatuously.


Last edited by thornbush on Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:53 am 
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Continuation....
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
THREE - STORIED HOUSE
Once there was an ignorant rich man who, one day, went to another rich man's three-storied house. Struck with admiration by the imposing, spacious, airy and well - lighted building, he said to himself, "I'm no less rich than he. Why don't I have the same house built as this one?"

Thereupon, he sent for a carpenter and said, "Can you construct an imposing house exactly like that one?"

That carpenter replied, "It's I who built that one."

He went on, "Now you may build a house like that one for me."

The carpenter began first to level the ground, afterward laid the foundation stones and then drove in piles for walls. The stupid man could not make it out when he saw the worker doing all these. He asked,"What are you doing now?"

The carpenter replied, "I'm building three floors."

The stupid man went on, "I don't want the two floors below. You had better start building from the third floor for me."

The carpenter answered, "It's impossible. If I don't begin with the ground floor, how can I build the second? If I don't build the two below, how can I build the third floor?"

The stupid man persisted saying, "But I don't need the two floors below, only the top."

Hearing those words, his contemporaries sardonically laughed at him. They all said how could one have the top floor done without building the lower floors?

Sakyamuni's four degrees of disciples who are unable to practice earnestly Buddhism and respect the Three Precious Ones, wanted to attain the path of deliverance by leading an idle life. They said, "We don't need the first three degrees below, but seek only that of Arahant's."

There was no difference between the stupid rich man and those disciples who were also laughed at by their contemporaries.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 1:28 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
THE BRAHMAN KILLS HIS SON
Once upon a time, there was a Brahman who prided himself on his erudite knowledge of astrology and various arts. He was such a conceited man that he claimed to be learned in everything. To show his ability, he went abroad carrying his son in his arms and cried. The Brahman was asked, "Why are you crying?"

He replied, "This baby is going to die within seven days. I'm grieved at his inevitable death. That's why I can't help crying."

The contemporaries said, "It's difficult to know a man's life. It's easy to make a miscalculation. He may not die seven days. Why should you weep in advance?"

The Brahman said, "The sun and the moon may set and the stars may fall, but I have never had a miscalculation on my record."

To prove his self-claimed knowledge, he killed his son on the seventh day, for the sake of fame and gain. The contemporaries heard the news of his son's death at the foretold time. They marvelled that he was indeed an erudite man who could prove true of what he had said. They all came to pay him homage, and were heartily convinced that he deserved respect (as a prophet).

This is also true with those of Sakyamuni's four degrees of disciples who claim to have attained the path of Enlightenment for the sake of the material offerings from others. They would try to fool people by killing an innocent man in order to deceitfully show the virtue of compassion. Such disciples would be certainly doomed to limitless suffering in time to come, just like the Brahman who wanted to prove the accuracy of his prophecy by killing his son and thus deceived people.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 8:18 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
THE BOILED BLACK ROCK - HONEY SYRUP
Once upon a time, a man was boiling black rock-honey syrup, when a rich man came to his house. He thought he would give the syrup to the rich man. He poured a little water into it and put it on a slow fire. He then fanned it with a fan in the hope of cooling it.

A bystander addressed to him, "If you don't put out the fire below, how can you cool it even though you keep on fanning?"

People began to laugh at him.

This is like the heretics who will practice a little mortification by sleeping on thorny brambles without putting out the flames of annoyance. As the five passions are still blazing within them, there is no way for such people to become cool and quiet. As a result, they sardonically laughed at by the wise. Moreover, they will suffer affliction in their present lives and transmigration in the future.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 4:07 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
COMMENTING ON SOMEONE'S QUICK TEMPER
Once a group of people sat in a house commenting on someone as being of good virtue except for two faults:

First, he was quick- tempered. Second, he was impulsive.

At the time, this man happened to pass by the door and heard the comment. He entered the house, grabbed the man who had criticized him, and started to beat him.

Thereupon one bystander asked why he beat the man.

He replied, "When did I ever lose my temper or act impulsively? This man said: I often did so. That's why I have beaten him."

The bystander pointed out, "Your action at once demonstrates that you have often lost your temper and acted impulsively. Why do you still want to conceal your character from others?"

This man who resents to having his faults exposed, often leads people to lay all the blame for the stupidity and foolishness on him.

People, who are addicted to drinking and other debaucheries, when scolded by others, strongly hate their critics in turn. Moreover, they try desperately to justify themselves by bringing forward all sorts of excuses. Those men are just like that stupid man who disliked hearing about his faults discussed.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 1:40 am 
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Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
Quote:
OFFERING THE GUIDE UP AS SACRIFICE TO GOD
Once upon a time there was a group of merchants who wanted to go to the sea. A guide was required. They set out in quest of such a man. After finding such a man, they started the trip and saw a temple when they reached a land of wilderness. A man had to be immolated to cross it.

After consultation, the group of merchants said that they could not choose anyone in the company to be killed, for they were all related. The only one fit to be sacrificed was the guide. So they killed him. After performing the rites, they soon lost their way and knew not which direction to go. They then died one after another.

So are the people in general.

Those who seek to fish for treasure in the sea of Dharma should keep the commandments of doing good deeds as their guide. If they break them, they will end their lives in the wilderness and can never be rescued. Furthermore, they will have to go through the Three Evil Paths of Transmigration and suffer forever and ever.

Such men are just like the group of merchants who killed the guide and died in a body as a result.

Namo Amitabha Buddha!


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