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The Quotable Thanissaro - Page 7 - Dhamma Wheel

The Quotable Thanissaro

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
dhammapal
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:42 am







dhammapal
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Sun Mar 31, 2013 8:57 am







dhammapal
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Fri Apr 05, 2013 6:17 am







Buckwheat
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby Buckwheat » Fri Apr 05, 2013 3:11 pm

:goodpost: That take on boredom was revolutionary for me. I used to think boredom was a lack of activity. He opened my eyes to the fact that I was actively "being bored", and it forced my awareness to a whole new level of detail. I don't think I really understood mindfulness until I caught onto that one.
Sotthī hontu nirantaraṃ - May you forever be well.

dhammapal
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Thu Apr 18, 2013 12:10 pm







dhammapal
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Fri Apr 26, 2013 11:29 am







binocular
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby binocular » Fri Apr 26, 2013 6:43 pm

I appreciate that he translates "metta" as 'goodwill.'


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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Sat Apr 27, 2013 3:06 am







binocular
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby binocular » Sat Apr 27, 2013 12:03 pm

/.../
The Buddha offered these teachings to people seeking advice on how to find true happiness. That's why he was able to avoid any coercion of others: His teachings assumed that his listeners were already involved in a search. When we understand his views on what it means to search — why people search, and what they're searching for — we can understand his advice on how to use faith and empiricism in a successful search. The best way to do this is to examine five of his similes illustrating how a search should be conducted.

The first simile illustrates search in its most raw and unfocused form:

Two strong men have grabbed another man by the arms and are dragging him to a pit of burning embers. The Buddha notes, "Wouldn't the man twist his body this way and that?"

The twisting of his body stands for the way we react to suffering. We don't bother to ask if our suffering is predetermined or our actions have any hope of success. We simply put up a struggle and do what we can to escape. It's our natural reaction.

The Buddha taught that this reaction is twofold: We're bewildered — "Why is this happening to me?" — and we search for a way to put an end to the suffering. When he stated that all he taught was suffering and the end of suffering, he was responding to these two reactions, providing an explanation of suffering and its end so as to do away with our bewilderment, at the same time showing the way to the end of suffering as a way of satisfying our search. He had no use for the idea — often advanced by later writers in the Buddhist tradition — that our suffering comes from our struggle to resist suffering; that the search for an end to suffering is precisely what keeps us from seeing the peace already there. In the light of the above simile, simply relaxing into a total acceptance of the moment means relaxing into the prospect of being burned alive. The present keeps morphing into the future, and you can't turn a blind eye to where it's taking you.

This simile also explains why the idea of a Buddhism without faith holds little appeal for people suffering from serious illness, oppression, poverty, or racism: Their experience has shown that the only way to overcome these obstacles is to pursue truths of the will, which require faith as their rock-solid foundation.
/.../



dhammapal
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:49 pm







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fivebells
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby fivebells » Tue Apr 30, 2013 2:09 am


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kirk5a
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby kirk5a » Tue Apr 30, 2013 2:41 am

"When one thing is practiced & pursued, ignorance is abandoned, clear knowing arises, the conceit 'I am' is abandoned, latent tendencies are uprooted, fetters are abandoned. Which one thing? Mindfulness immersed in the body." -AN 1.230

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fivebells
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby fivebells » Tue Apr 30, 2013 4:08 pm

Thanks, kirk5a.

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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Thu May 02, 2013 12:21 am







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retrofuturist
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby retrofuturist » Thu May 02, 2013 1:45 am

"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

SarathW
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby SarathW » Thu May 02, 2013 10:00 am

Hi Retro
Ven Thanissaro said:
"we have an impermanent, interdependent self"
-----
The way I understand is we do not have an interdependent self. Am I missing something here. :juggling:
I agree that there is no unchanging everlasting entity.
“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

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retrofuturist
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby retrofuturist » Thu May 02, 2013 11:58 am

Greetings SarathW,

Re-read the sentence, paying careful attention to the first four words.

:reading:

Metta,
Retro. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

SarathW
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby SarathW » Fri May 03, 2013 12:01 am

“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

dhammapal
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby dhammapal » Tue May 14, 2013 8:09 pm







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Kusala
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Re: The Quotable Thanissaro

Postby Kusala » Sun May 19, 2013 12:17 pm


"If you read a lot books about the Dhamma, it can get pretty confusing after a while, for there are so many different takes on exactly what the Dhamma is. On top of that, there are people who will tell you it's all very complex, very subtle; only a very erudite scholar or subtle logician could figure it all out. With so many teachings, it's hard to figure out which ones to hold on to. Of course, some people will tell you can't hold onto anything at all. That makes it even more confusing and obscure.

So it's good to remember the Buddha taught the Dhamma in very simple terms. And all the teachings derived from a very few basic, very commonsensical principles. You might call it wisdom for dummies: the kind of wisdom that comes from looking at what's actually going on in your life, asking some very basic questions, and applying a few basic principles to solve your big problems.

When you use wisdom for dummies, it doesn't mean you're dumb. It means you recognize that you've been foolish and you want to wise up. As the Buddha once said, when you recognize your foolishness, you are to that extent wise. This may sound obvious, but when you think about it, you see that it teaches you some import things about wisdom. In fact, the realization that you've been foolish contains within itself many of the basic principles of the Dhamma.

To begin with, this kind of realization usually comes to you when you see you've made a mistake that could have been avoided. In recognizing that much, you recognize your actions do make a difference: Some actions are more skillful that others. In recognizing that the mistake came from your foolishness, you recognize the principle that your ideas and intentions played a role in your actions, and that you could have operated under other ideas and intentions. You could have been wiser--the mistake wasn't preordained--and you got something to learn. That right there is the beginning of wisdom."
Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "


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