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The Crisis in Thai Buddhism - Dhamma Wheel

The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
plwk
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The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby plwk » Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:57 pm

Image

If Thai Buddhism has been corrupted and lost its way, as critics are alleging, you would never know it by talking to Mod and her friends, whose devotion keeps them making merit and seeking solace at Wat Tha Mai, one of Bangkok's scores of Buddhist temples, every weekend. More

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Goofaholix
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby Goofaholix » Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:17 pm


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Bhikkhu Pesala
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:26 pm

If people stopped regarding the faults of others, and instead corrected their own defects, perhaps they would find the right way again.

If you look down you will see the ants apparently lost and not knowing which way to run, but if you look up you will see the vast emptiness of space. Then you may wonder about your own significance in this universe, and how you came to be here.
• • • • (Upasampadā: 24th June, 1979)

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appicchato
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby appicchato » Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:08 pm


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manas
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby manas » Tue Feb 05, 2013 11:27 pm

Last edited by manas on Wed Feb 06, 2013 5:10 am, edited 2 times in total.
Then the Blessed One, picking up a tiny bit of dust with the tip of his fingernail, said to the monk, "There isn't even this much form...feeling...
perception...fabrications...consciousness that is constant, lasting, eternal, not subject to change, that will stay just as it is as long as eternity."

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cooran
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby cooran » Tue Feb 05, 2013 11:53 pm

But then there is this perspective - looking at oneself:

http://Www.tricycle.com/dharma-talk/power-judgment
(judgmental is bad .... Judicious is good)
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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GraemeR
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The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby GraemeR » Wed Feb 06, 2013 1:56 am


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retrofuturist
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Feb 06, 2013 3:48 am

"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

Sylvester
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby Sylvester » Wed Feb 06, 2013 4:07 am


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mikenz66
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Feb 06, 2013 4:36 am


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retrofuturist
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Feb 06, 2013 5:08 am

"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

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mikenz66
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Feb 06, 2013 6:33 am

Hi Retro,

I haven't seen the photos you are talking about, so it's very hard to figure out exactly what you are talking about. However, I think that it would be a mistake to assume that smiling is necessary, or appropriate, at such times, or that lack of a smile signals a negative state of mind. I certainly wouldn't be grinning while the monks were chanting a Pali blessing, as in the photo I posted.

:anjali:
Mike

plwk
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby plwk » Wed Feb 06, 2013 2:16 pm

Mike... unless I have a cat bias, that dog looks like it was going to poop in front of the Bhikkhus... :tongue:

Sylvester
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby Sylvester » Wed Feb 06, 2013 2:28 pm

I couldn't bring myself to say it but now that it's been said ... SQUAT!

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mikenz66
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Feb 06, 2013 6:05 pm


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gavesako
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby gavesako » Wed Feb 06, 2013 6:25 pm

There are well-trained dogs in Thailand who carry buckets with food for the monks on the way from almsround, or pull a cart behind them to help an old monk. Some really clever dogs have even joined in the evening chanting!

:soap:
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
- Translations and history of Pali texts
- Sutta translations

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gavesako
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Re: The Crisis in Thai Buddhism

Postby gavesako » Wed Aug 14, 2013 5:53 pm

The Emotional Lives of Buddhist Monks in Modern Thai Film
By Justin McDaniel


Abstract
As Phra Tham, a forest monk from Southern Thailand, traveled by train from his monastery to his home town for his younger sister’s cremation, he is tormented by visions of Muslim passengers wanting to kill him and the site of his sister being blown apart by a terrorist bomb. He is on the verge of tears the entire trip. This early scene in Nonzee Nimibutr’s film, OK Baytong, is one of many in recent Thai films which depict Southeast Asian Buddhist monks exhibiting extreme emotional joy, anger, or distress. Other films depict monks laughing hysterically, lashing out violently, sobbing uncontrollably, or fearfully trembling. These films, a small selection described below, offer a revealing lens into the myriad ways in which monks are displayed in Thailand. They also demonstrate the value of narrative ethics in the study and teaching of Southeast Asian Buddhism.

Article

[1] Theravada Buddhist monks are often described as the most orthodox and orthopraxic professional adherents of Buddhism. They are bearers of the Vinaya monastic code of 227 precepts which help them monitor every aspect of their daily lives from going to the bathroom, to walking, to sleeping. They deny themselves luxuries of any kind, go on alms rounds, shave their heads and eyebrows, wear simple robes, eat only before noon, and are perpetually shoeless, penniless, and perhaps, expectedly, joyless. Of course, the precepts do not require monks to be joyless or devoid of emotions, but this is the way they are often depicted in documentaries, coffee table books, and even feature films. Indeed, Buddhist monks are regularly depicted as quiet, peaceful, calm, and passive either living in the forest monasteries or meditating in caves. Scenes from feature films like Why has Bodhidharma Left for the East?, The Little Buddha, Angulimala, Seven Years in Tibet, among many others depict monks as calm and reserved. In the classroom, popular documentaries by Alan Watts, Harley educational films, the Long Search Series depict monks as detached ascetics. I particularly noticed the power of this pervasive stereotype after a recent field trip to a local Thai monastery in Southern California. I asked members of my undergraduate course “Introduction to Buddhism,” what surprised them about the monastery they visited. I was struck by a number of their comments. One student wondered why two monks were laughing and sharing jokes with each other. Another asked if it was alright that one monk was playing with a few children at the monastery. One criticized a monk who told the students he missed his family in Thailand. She thought he shouldn’t be so attached. I said, “Don’t you ever miss your family?” She said “of course, but I’m not a monk, he should be more detached.” ...

http://www.unomaha.edu/jrf/vol14.no2/Mc ... dhist.html

:hug:
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
- Translations and history of Pali texts
- Sutta translations


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