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Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain - Dhamma Wheel

Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

A forum for members who wish to develop a deeper understanding of the Pali Canon and associated Commentaries, which for discussion purposes are both treated as authoritative.

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shipwright
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Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby shipwright » Tue Jan 15, 2013 3:19 am

...the cause, the germ, of the arising of dukkha is within dukkha itself, and not outside; and we must equally well remember that the cause, the germ, of the cessation of dukkha, of the destruction of dukkha, is also within dukkha itself, and not outside. -- Walpola Rahula, "What The Buddha Taught"

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polarbear101
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby polarbear101 » Tue Jan 15, 2013 3:34 am

First, I think it means that a first cause will never be found. Second, I think it supports the Buddha's statements that searching for answers about the temporal duration of the universe is stupid and a waste of time. Third, and most importantly, these words were spoken so as to induce dispassion, disenchantment, and the abandoning of craving for the five aggregates because there will never be final satisfaction gained from them and all there is in the future is endless rounds of birth, aging, illness and death; it is enough to become disenchanted even with the greatest of pleasures. I think that's the gist of it.

:anjali:
"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."

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shipwright
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby shipwright » Wed Jan 16, 2013 3:43 am

...the cause, the germ, of the arising of dukkha is within dukkha itself, and not outside; and we must equally well remember that the cause, the germ, of the cessation of dukkha, of the destruction of dukkha, is also within dukkha itself, and not outside. -- Walpola Rahula, "What The Buddha Taught"

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Bhikkhu Pesala
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Wed Jan 16, 2013 4:47 am

The difficult takes time — the impossible takes longer.

Its not hard to understand that there can be no beginning to a circle.

The teaching helps me to stop trying to relieve suffering in the wrong way, by trying to change external conditions, but to look at the root causes within myself whenever and however suffering arises.
• • • • (Upasampadā: 24th June, 1979)

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manas
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby manas » Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:21 am

:goodpost:
Then the Blessed One, picking up a tiny bit of dust with the tip of his fingernail, said to the monk, "There isn't even this much form...feeling...
perception...fabrications...consciousness that is constant, lasting, eternal, not subject to change, that will stay just as it is as long as eternity."

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Cittasanto
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby Cittasanto » Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:36 pm

Hi Shipwright,
I understand this as meaning you can over (and under) think things. There comes a point that you need to know to just put it aside as it will not do any good to continue to think about it in that particular way, and maybe a new angle is necessary. Or that it is something that will just never reach a resolution through thinking.
We need to learn to see when things are doing nothing but going on and on, and deal with it effectively by either putting it aside or starting again from a different vantage point.


He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.

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Kim OHara
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby Kim OHara » Wed Jan 16, 2013 10:19 pm


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polarbear101
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby polarbear101 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 11:11 pm

"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."

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shipwright
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby shipwright » Thu Jan 17, 2013 12:35 am

...the cause, the germ, of the arising of dukkha is within dukkha itself, and not outside; and we must equally well remember that the cause, the germ, of the cessation of dukkha, of the destruction of dukkha, is also within dukkha itself, and not outside. -- Walpola Rahula, "What The Buddha Taught"

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Cittasanto
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby Cittasanto » Thu Jan 17, 2013 6:36 am



He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.

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shipwright
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Re: Grass, Sticks, and The Mountain

Postby shipwright » Fri Jan 18, 2013 2:24 am

Thank you Cittasanto. I will take some time to think on your response.
...the cause, the germ, of the arising of dukkha is within dukkha itself, and not outside; and we must equally well remember that the cause, the germ, of the cessation of dukkha, of the destruction of dukkha, is also within dukkha itself, and not outside. -- Walpola Rahula, "What The Buddha Taught"


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