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enjoying nature - Dhamma Wheel

enjoying nature

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
befriend
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enjoying nature

Postby befriend » Fri Oct 12, 2012 7:05 pm

how do we enjoy the sights of nature without liking coming up?
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

perkele
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby perkele » Fri Oct 12, 2012 7:33 pm

How do we eat soup without tasting it?

santa100
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby santa100 » Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:05 pm


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daverupa
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby daverupa » Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:36 pm


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cooran
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby cooran » Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:35 pm

Hello befriend, all,

This extract might be of interest:

The Buddhist Attitude Towards Nature by Lily de Silva
[……………………………………….]




The Buddha and his disciples regarded natural beauty as a source of great joy and aesthetic satisfaction. The saints who purged themselves of sensuous worldly pleasures responded to natural beauty with a detached sense of appreciation. The average poet looks at nature and derives inspiration mostly by the sentiments it evokes in his own heart; he becomes emotionally involved with nature. For instance, he may compare the sun's rays passing over the mountain tops to the blush on a sensitive face, he may see a tear in a dew drop, the lips of his beloved in a rose petal, etc. But the appreciation of the saint is quite different. He appreciates nature's beauty for its own sake and derives joy unsullied by sensuous associations and self-projected ideas. The simple spontaneous appreciation of nature's exquisite beauty is expressed by the Elder Mahakassapa in the following words:[60]
Those upland glades delightful to the soul,
Where the Kaveri spreads its wildering wreaths,
Where sound the trumpet-calls of elephants:
Those are the hills where my soul delights.

Those rocky heights with hue of dark blue clouds
Where lies embossed many a shining lake
Of crystal-clear, cool waters, and whose slopes
The 'herds of Indra' cover and bedeck:
Those are the hills wherein my soul delights.

Fair uplands rain-refreshed, and resonant
With crested creatures' cries antiphonal,
Lone heights where silent Rishis oft resort:
Those are the hills wherein my soul delights.
Again the poem of Kaludayi, inviting the Buddha to visit Kapilavatthu, contains a beautiful description of spring:[61]
Now crimson glow the trees, dear Lord, and cast
Their ancient foliage in quest of fruit,
Like crests of flame they shine irradiant
And rich in hope, great Hero, is the hour.

Verdure and blossom-time in every tree
Wherever we look delightful to the eye,
And every quarter breathing fragrant airs,
While petals falling, yearning comes fruit:
It is time, O Hero, that we set out hence.
The long poem of Talaputa is a fascinating soliloquy.[62] His religious aspirations are beautifully blended with a profound knowledge of the teachings of the Buddha against the background of a sylvan resort. Many more poems could be cited for saintly appreciation of nature, but it is not necessary to burden the essay with any more quotations. Suffice it to know that the saints, too, were sensitive to the beauties and harmony of nature and that their appreciation is colored by spontaneity, simplicity, and a non-sensuous spirituality.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... itude.html

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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tiltbillings
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Oct 12, 2012 10:09 pm


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tiltbillings
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Oct 12, 2012 10:18 pm


befriend
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby befriend » Fri Oct 12, 2012 11:19 pm

liking and disliking are defilements.
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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tiltbillings
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Oct 12, 2012 11:33 pm


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tiltbillings
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:08 am


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LonesomeYogurt
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:20 am

Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta


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tiltbillings
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Oct 13, 2012 1:14 am


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LonesomeYogurt
Posts: 900
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:49 am

Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta


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tiltbillings
Posts: 23012
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: enjoying nature

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:51 am


Cassandra
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby Cassandra » Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:52 am


Cassandra
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby Cassandra » Sat Oct 13, 2012 3:15 am


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JeffR
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby JeffR » Sat Oct 13, 2012 3:36 am


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Kim OHara
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby Kim OHara » Sat Oct 13, 2012 4:15 am


rowyourboat
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby rowyourboat » Sat Oct 13, 2012 4:39 am

By seeing the drawbacks of pleasant sensation (sukha vedana) we eventually let go of the mind's tendency to give rise to craving for pleasant sensation. Craving is the cause of suffering and ignorance about the true nature (no pun intended) of pleasant sensations give rise to craving- so we must understand and explore this phenomena and eventually abandon (pahana) it. Delight (nandi) is another defilement to be abandoned. However the arahanths cannot abandon pleasant sensation as it is part of the five aggregates which stay with them until death. So they continue to experience pleasant sensations. They are said to go into jhana for 'pleasant abiding' or do right contemplation (yonisomanasikara) for the same reasons. When there is no fear of craving arising again they can enjoy this as much as they want. The Buddha speaking of monks says that for non-returners and arahanths there is no danger in it for them to eat good tasting food, referring to them having removed all sensual craving.

With metta
With Metta

Karuna
Mudita
& Upekkha

xtracorrupt
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Re: enjoying nature

Postby xtracorrupt » Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:07 pm

do not judge nature, appreciate it
theres is no need for needing


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