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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 6:14 am 
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Dear members,

This peaceful full moon Uposatha night..please let me share this Buddha's dhamma with you all.

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Twenty Six Defilements To Be Dispelled!
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


The upakkilesas (defilements, corruptions) are defined in the Upakkilesa Samyutta. These are the desire-passions with regard to the following groups: the six internal bases (eye, ear, ..., mind), the six external bases (form, sounds, ..., mind-objects), the six consciousnesses at the bases, the six contacts, the six feelings born of contact, the six perceptions, the six intentions, the six cravings for the external bases, the five properties (dhatus: earth, liquid, ..., consciousness), and the five aggregates (khandhas). When these defilements of the mind (defilements of awareness) are abandoned, then the mind is inclined to renunciation. "The mind fostered by renunciation feels malleable for the direct knowing of those qualities worth realizing".

Besides the above defilements of awareness, the Buddha also specifies the following twenty-six defilements to be dispelled in order that greed, hate and delusion can be dispelled for the cessation of dukkha:
Shamelessness; without remorse; negligence; disrespect; unruliness; association with evil friends; lack of faith; stinginess; laziness; excitement; lack of restraint; evil virtues; dislike to see noble ones; dislike to hear the teaching of the noble ones; reproaching mind; forgetfulness, lack of mindful awareness; derangement of mind; unwise attention; practising in the wrong path; sluggish mind; self-views; doubt; greed; hate; delusion. Dispelling greed, hate and delusion it is possible to dispel birth, decay and death.

[Anguttara Nikaya, Akankhavaggo. AN 10.76 Tayodhammasutta.m]

Let's be free from the defilements!

***************
Love Buddhas :heart:
tidathep/Buddhaflower :heart:


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 2013 4:01 pm 
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Dear Members....Liberating Virtue: What Is It?

This rainy Saturday morning..I have a wonderful dhamma to share with you all:

**************
:heart: Liberating Virtue: What Is It? :heart:
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


[See Patisambhidamagga I, 258]

There is a famous description of the kind of virtue that the Buddha praises: it is a factor for Stream-entry (sotápattiyanga).
"He is endowed with virtues that are appealing to the noble ones: untorn, unbroken, unspotted, unsplattered, liberating, praised by the wise, untarnished, leading to concentration.
[AN 10.92, Vera Sutta. AN 6.12, Saraniya Sutta. SN 55.4, Nandiya Sutta. SN 55.31, Abhisanda Sutta and at least 5 more suttas.]

The other kinds of virtue that the Buddha does not approve are the following: Virtue that has gain as its limit; virtue that has fame as its limit; virtue that has relatives as its limit; virtue that has limbs as its limit; and virtue that has life as its limit.

Those kinds of virtue are torn, rent, blotched, mottled, they are not liberating, not commended by the wise; they are misapprehended (paraamaasa), not conducive to concentration, not a basis for non-remorse, not a basis for gladness(paamojja), not a basis for happiness(piiti), not a basis for tranquillity(passaddhi), not a basis for bliss(sukha), not a basis for concentration(samadhi), not a basis for correct knowledge and seeing; they do not lead to complete dispassion(nibbidaa), to fading of greed(viraaga), to cessation (nirodha), to peace (upasama), to direct knowledge, to enlightenment, to nibbana: such virtue has a limit.

Love Buddhas :heart:


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2013 1:44 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

My kalayanamitta, Dr.Han Tun, posted this SUTTA yesterday.. I always love THE NOBLE TRUTH...please let me share with you all......

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SN 56.21 Ko.tigaama Sutta (1)
[Presented by Dr.Han Tun @ JTN]


On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling among the Vajjians at Ko.tigaama. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus thus: "Bhikkhus, it is because of not understanding and not penetrating the Four Noble Truths that you and I have roamed and wandered through this long course of sa.msaara. ["Catunna.m, bhikkhave, ariyasaccaana.m ananubodhaa appa.tivedhaa evamida.m diighamaddhaana.m sandhaavita.m sa.msarita.m mama~nceva tumhaaka.~nca"]. What four?

"It is, bhikkhus, because of not understanding and not penetrating the noble truth of suffering that you and I have roamed and wandered through this long course of sa.msaara. It is because of not understanding and not penetrating the noble truth of the origin of suffering -- the noble truth of the cessation of suffering -- the noble truth of the way leading to the cessation of suffering that you and I have roamed and wandered through this long course of sa.msaara.

"That noble truth of suffering, bhikkhus, has been understood and penetrated. That noble truth of the origin of suffering has been understood and penetrated. That noble truth of the cessation of suffering has been understood and penetrated. That noble truth of the way leading to the cessation of suffering has been understood and penetrated. Craving for existence has been cut off; the conduit to existence has been destroyed; now there is no more renewed existence.”

This is what the Blessed One said. Having said this, the Fortunate One, the Teacher, further said this:

"Because of not seeing as they are
The Four Noble Truths,
We have wandered through the long course
In the various kinds of births.

"Now these truths have been seen;
The conduit to existence is severed;
Cut off is the root of suffering:
Now there is no more renewed existence."

*********

Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 1:47 pm 
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Questions/Answers : Dhamma Understanding

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

These days, I try to read every dhamma posted @ my websites, try so hard to understand, writing poems based on dhamma that I read... dhamma seems to sink into my brain..easier to read/understand than befote ...Dhamma is amazing, isn't it? There is no teacher like the Buddha.

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Questions/Answers : Dhamma Understanding
[Presented by Tep sastri @ Saripittadhamma]


Question #1 : What things (dhammas) are to be fully understood (comprehended, pari~n~naata)?

Answer : They are the five khandhas, the internal and external sense-bases (aayatana), the dependent origination (Paticcasamuppada dhammas), the Noble Path (magga), and so on. [See Patisambhidamagga, Treatise I.]

"Form, bhikkhus, is something that should be fully understood. Feeling .. Perception .. Volitional formations .. Consciousness is something that should be fully understood."

------------

Question #2 : And what, bhikkhus, is full understanding?

Answer : "The destruction of lust, the destruction of hatred, the destruction of delusion: this is called full understanding." [SN 22.106 Pari~n~neyya Sutta]

"Any ending of passion, ending of aversion, ending of delusion. This is called comprehension." [SN 22.23, translator: Thanissaro Bhikkhu]

------------

Question #3 : How is one trained in full undestanding?

Answer : The trainer (sekha) pratices the three higher learning (adhi-sila-sikkha, adhi-citta-sikkha, adhi-pa~n~na-sikkha) by fully understanding the dhammas as shown above. When the trainer has fully understood (comprehended) these dhammas, he attains arahantship.

"He trains by adverting to these three kinds of training, he trains by knowing them, by seeing them, by reviewing them, by steadying [cognizance, mind] upon them, by resolving with faith upon them, by exerting energy upon them, by establishing mindfulness upon them, by concentrating cognizance upon them, by understanding them with understanding, by directly knowing what is to be directly known, by fully understanding what is to be fully understood, by abandoning what is to be abandoned, by realizing what is to be realized, he trains by developing what should be developed, ..." [Ptsm I, 265]

*************
Love Buddha's dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 2:11 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka :anjali:

I love to read Acariya Mun Bhuridatta Thera's Spiritual Biography ...and I'm so impressed with Thera Mun's preaching to his monks who stayed with him for guidance:

Venerable Acariya Mun Bhuridatta Thera
- A Spiritual Biography

[by Acariya Maha Boowa Ñanasampanno
Translated by Bhikkhu Dick Silaratano]


“Only a monk who is firm in his discipline and respectful of all the
training rules can be considered a full-fledged monk. He should not
transgress the minor training rules merely because he considers them
to be somehow insignificant. Such negligence indicates someone
who feels no shame about immoral behavior, and it may eventually
lead to more serious transgressions. A monk must strictly adhere to
the monastic code of discipline to make sure that his moral behavior
is not punctuated with unsightly blemishes or gaps. In that way, he
feels comfortable and confident living among his peers. He need
never be concerned that his teacher or his fellow monks will be
critical or reproachful. For the inner monk in your heart to reach
perfection, starting from Sotãpanna and progressing to Arahant, you
must be steady and relentless in your effort to attain each successive
level of both samãdhi and wisdom. If you persevere in this manner,
these faculties will arise and continue to develop until they are able
to scrub clean that filthy mess of defilements in your heart.

“A monk’s conduct and speech should be absolutely above
reproach. His citta should be absolutely superb by virtue of the
Dhamma qualities that he develops step by step: samãdhi, paññã,
vimutti, and vimuttiñãõadassana.A monk should never be dreary or
sad. He should never appear undignified, shunning his fellows
because a guilty conscience is eating away inside him, troubling
his heart. This is contrary to the way of the Lord Buddha,
whose splendid internal conduct and external behavior were
irreproachable. Following in his footsteps, a monk must muster the
resolute courage to abandon all evil and do only good. He must be
a man of integrity who is honest with himself and his peers while
being faithful to the Dhamma and the Discipline. He will thus be
supported by his exemplary practice everywhere he goes. The
brightness of his mindfulness and wisdom will light the way as his
heart will be suffused with the taste of Dhamma. He will never find
himself trapped in a state of delusion with no means of escape. Such
are the characteristics inherent in a true disciple of the Lord Buddha.

***********
tidathep :reading:


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:11 pm 
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All these excerpts may or may not in context accurately represent the Theravada view;.
What is less clear to me is what light they shed on the Mahayana/Vajrayana view.
And the header says that Dharma Wheel is a Mahayana and Vajrayana forum.

Would this not be more suitable on Dhamma Wheel ?


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2013 9:39 am 
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Simon E. wrote:
All these excerpts may or may not in context accurately represent the Theravada view;.
What is less clear to me is what light they shed on the Mahayana/Vajrayana view.
And the header says that Dharma Wheel is a Mahayana and Vajrayana forum.

Would this not be more suitable on Dhamma Wheel ?


It's Dharma posted in the open Dharma forum.

:anjali:


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2013 3:26 pm 
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I am not suggesting that the content was somehow inappropriate. I was merely suggesting that a Theravada Forum like Dhamma Wheel would be a better fit, and that the thread would be more likely to get a response. :smile:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 3:21 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

This post is from my dear dhamma friend's book. I love the questions/answers very much. And I wonder if Jambukādaka and Jambuka are the same person??? If any member knows ...please post the story.

*************
Mind-Matter, and Meditation
[The book..written By Charles.S.Perera]


A mind with delusion(mōha) will neither see the four noble truths nor the noble eightfold path.

Jambukādaka asks Venerable Sāriputta:

“ What is delusion Venerable Sir ? “

“Not knowing unsatisfactoriness (dukkha), not knowing the cause for unsatisfactoriness (dukkha samudaya), not knowing the end of unsatisfactoriness( dukkha nirōdha), and not knowing the path to end the unsatisfactoriness(magga) these are the delusions Jambukādaka “.

“ Is there a way to end delusion Venerable Sir ? ”

“ Yes Jambukādaka, there is a way to end delusion. ”

“ What is that way to end delusion Venerable Sir ? ”

“ the noble eight fold path is the way to end delusion, Jambukādaka”

(Jambukādaka Sūtta. Sa.myutta Nikāya 38)

And again Mahānāma a Sakkyan goes to see the Buddha, and says:

“Venerable Sir, I have understood the implication of desire (lōbha), aversion (dōsa) and delusion (mōha) as you have explained. I also know the results of these defilements (kilēsa). Nevertheless, how ever much I try to avoid them thoughts of desire, aversion and delusion keep on arising. Why am I unable to suppress them ? Is it because I do not follow the correct path for their destruction ? If it is so, Sir, please show me, the correct path to follow.”

The Buddha then says: “as long as you have not destroyed desire (lōbha), aversion( dōsa) and delusion (mōha), so long will you lead a lay life fostering the growth of desire, aversion and delusion. Because of them you will continue to lead a lay life enjoying the sense desires. If you will give up the lay life and the enjoyment of the pleasures of the senses, you will be able to destroy the cankers of desire, aversion and delusion .” (Cūla Dukkhakkhandha Sutta -MN14)

The enjoyment of the bliss of a moment of jhāna absorption, having stopped the arising of defilements through attachment, aversion and delusiona, is a far greater pleasure, than all the illusiory pleasures derived from a life long fulfilment of sense desires.

*****************
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 09, 2013 9:51 am 
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Sawaddee Ka :hi:

This very early Saturday morning is so cold..I think I should walk meditation inside the house.

**********
Mind-Matter, and Meditation
[written By Charles.S.Perera]


Thoughts arising during meditation: Jhāna citta

The sense doors- the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and the body continually come in contact with objects which give rise to thoughts of attachment to these objects or aversion to them as a result of which we accumulate wholesome or unwholesome kamma. When we have moments of idleness, without reading, listening , or having no one to talk to, we become despondent, sad , bored, or depressed.

On such occasions the thoughts that invade our minds come through the mind-door itself taking as objects the memories of what we had done, what we had eaten, of those who we have seen, what we had heard, what we had smelt, what we had felt or what we hope to do. These are concepts (sankhāra) to which we get attached, or towards which we have aversion. They are the mental defilements we continue to accumulate in numerous ways.

Even when we do good actions such as an act of generosity (dāna), keeping the precepts (sīla), or meditating(bhāvanā), we may have unwholesome thoughts (akusala citta). One could accumulate unwholesome kamma by merely thinking of what had been said or heard. These are thoughts of the sensuous world (kāmāvacara lōka citta). Therefore one has to maintain mindful attention (yoniso manasikāra) in one’s action, speech and thought, to limit the accumulation of defilements(kilesa).

The Buddha, when he was the Ascetic Siddhartha, went to two teachers Ālāra Kālāma and Uddaka Rāmaputtra, from whom he took instructions to attain jhāna absorptions. Thereafter, meditating on his own realised the practical use of concentration of the mind (samādhi) to attain jhāna absorptions. Later, in the enlightenment process, the Ascetic Siddhartha used the clarity of the mind after jhāna absorption to investigate the phenomenon of existence (dhamma vicāya), which is the insight meditation (vipassanā).

The jhāna citta are not the sensual thoughts of the sense sphere (kāmavacara citta). The thoughts at the beginning of meditation are concepts (parikamma Samādhi). Further concentration on the object of meditation brings the mind to the neighbourhood concentration ( upāchara Samadhi) which is still not the attainment of jhāna absorption. Then going through adaptation (anulōma), and maturity (gotrabhū) the mind of the meditator arrives at the attainment concentration(appanā samādhi), which is the absorption of the jhāna. It is only at this stage the meditator escapes from conceptual objects of meditation, where the mind is free of thoughts. The absorption into jhana is a mahā kusala citta.

As the mind develops in meditation, reaching different stages of concentration the hindrances (nīvarana) are overcome, resulting in the serene absorption of the mind into jhāna.

There are two types of Jhāna absorptions, one is of the fine material sphere( rūpāvacara) and the other the immaterial sphere (arūpāvacara). The rūpāvacara jhāna absorptions are wholesome thoughts( kusala citta). These kusala citta result in the rebirth in higher planes. The death consciousness (cuti citta) of a meditator who dies after jhāna absorptions, may carry with it this jhāna citta to link with a rebirth consciousness( patisandhi citta).

Jhana citta do not have, visible objects, sound, smell, taste , feelings or any other sense- impressions, as their object. A jhāna citta arises in the process of a citta experiencing a meditation object appearing through the mind-door. In this process there are first the kāmāvacara cittas which experience the object of meditation and then, in that same process, the jhāna citta arises.

**************
tidathep :namaste:


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 3:31 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I know that to remove the fetters is the best thing in the world...BUT, it's so very hard to kill the fetters!!


**********
Ten Fetters (dasa samyōjana) and Attainments on the path (magga)
[By Charles.S.Perera]


Fetter (samyōjana) definition Attainments on overcoming the fetters

1.Personality belief (Sakkāya ditthi) false view of the existence of a self lower fetters(ōrambhāgiya)

Overcoming completely the first three fetters one becomes a stream entrant (sōtāpanna)

2.Sceptical doubt (vicikicchā) doubt about the Buddha, his teachings and the Order of the Sangha

3.Clinging to religious rules and rituals (sīlabbata parāmāsa) false religious views (micchā diṭṭ̣̣̣hi). Belief in sacrificial rights, prayers for divine help

4.Sensuous craving (kamaraga) desire for five sense objects lower fetters(ōrambhāgiya)

Overcoming completely the first three fetters and weakening the 4 and 5 becomes a once re-turner (sakadāgāmi) Overcomes 1 to 5 to become non re-turner (anāgami)

5. Ill-will (vyāpāda) hatred, aversion

6.Craving for fine material existence (rūpa rāga)
Higher fetters (uddhambhāgiya)

Overcomes all the ten fetters to attain the state of an Arahat

7.Craving for immaterial existence( arūpa rāga)

8. Conceit (māna)

9. Restlessness (uddhaccha)

10.Ignorance (avijjā)

********
tidathep :anjali:


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2013 4:21 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka,

Dear friend Charles...I love this part of your book..because I'm trying to discipline my mind everyday..


*********************
Mind-Matter, and Meditation
[written By Charles.S.Perera]


Greed (lōbha), Aversion (dōsa) and Delusion (mōha)

A being is a constant arising and falling away of thoughts (citta). It is according to these thoughts that we conduct ourselves in our every day existence. The thoughts have made us what we are, and our different characters are a reflection of them. They are how we look at things, and how we relate ourselves to them. These thoughts of to-day rooted in greed (lōbha), aversion(dōsa) and delusion (mōha), had their beginnings in our many lives in the past in Samsāra, and have shaped our individual characters.

If we are to change this pattern of living built into our psychological system, which are our habits , we should change our thought process through a proper mental discipline that is capable of changing our old habits. But to break away from these habbits which we have grown into is difficult. It is like building a dam across a river to change the course of its flow to a different direction. It has to be a slow deliberate concentrated effort with a clear understanding of the consequences of such a change.

A person with a disciplined mind, is invariably disciplined also in thought, speech and action. Therefore the outcome of the change from old habits to a disciplined way of living, would be a person not led by thoughts resulting from greed(lōbha), aversion(dōsa) and delusion(mōha), but a person who will recognise the roots of his thoughts and will remain without reacting to unwholesome thoughts, or react contrary to it; for instance by being generous, when greed assails him, or being compassionate and kindly, in the presense of thoughts of anger and aversion, or be wise and understanding when clouded with delusion.

**************
tidathep :namaste:


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2013 3:18 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka :hi:

This lovely/cold Saturday, Thanksgiving 'shop till drop' is definitely over!! I'll try to practice MINDFULLNESS.. keep my mind free of thoughts through bare attentionan ...can I do it :thinking: ....may be :thinking:

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Mind-Matter, and Meditation
[written By Charles.S.Perera]


A person who lives mindfully does not let either wholesome, or unwholesome thoughts to arise from objects that come in contact with his sense faculties, and thus keeps his mind free of thoughts through bare attention. How can he keep the mind free of thoughts through bare attention ? Here keeping the mind free of thoughts means, that when he sees with his eyes, he merely sees, when he hears he merely hears, and that seeing or hearing does not go beyond the sense faculty’s normal activity. In other words the object “sensed” does not go beyond the mental factor of contact( phassa cētasika), and that stops the arising of thoughts related to the object.

Let us go back to Peter we met a page or two back, to see how wholesome and unwholesome kamma are accumulated. In the example, when some one called him by his name, Peter did not hear his name being called. What happened was, that the “sound Peter” did not reach the consciousness of his ear, in other words Peter did not pay attention to the sound. If Peter had paid attention, what would have happened ?

We explained that if the sound of his name being called had fallen on to Peter’s ear drums, he would have heard it as a sound and liked it if it was a pleasant sound, or disliked it if it was not. If Peter had paid attention to the sound the mental factor of perception (saññā cētasika) would arise. The mental factor of perception (saññā cētasika) keeps notes of special characteristics of an object, and is able to recognize similar objects by reference to previous “notes” it had taken of such objects. In the case of this particular “sound” in question, its special characteristics may be its roughness, a soft beautiful feminity or familiar friendliness. The mental factor of perception (saññā) has a “list of sounds”in its bank of memory and runs through it to find out whether it has a record of this particular sound. If it finds the particular characteristics of the present sound, in the “list”, it recognizes both, the sound , and the voice that pronounced it as that of a particular person. Let us call the person Victor.

After that, the next mental factor of volition (cētanā cētasika) arises and coordinates the information collected by the previous mental factors. It is, then that Peter recognizes the “sound” as that of his name, pronounced by Victor. If Victor is his friend, he will stop and salute Victor, if he is not a friend but “a person he would rather avoid meeting”, he may dislike him the more and pretend that he did not hear. This is a moment of accumulating unwholesome kamma as dislike is rooted in ill will (dōsa)

The arising of the mental factor of volition (cētanā) is kamma. It is often said that the thought that proceeds an action is volition(cētanā ). The Buddha says in his discourses: “I tell you Bikkhus, that volition is kamma”( cētana.n Bhikkavē kamma.m vadāmi). Cētanā is therefore kamma.

The mental factor of volition collects the information gathered by the other mental factors and passes it on to the next mental factor of mental advertence (manasikāra) which turns the mind to the object recognizing it as, Victor, my friend, a red rose, a glass of fruit juice, and makes a concept of it and keeps it in memory. Therefore, it is only at this stage that the image of the external object reaches the mental factor of advertence (manasikāra), when we see the whole of the external object, and recognise it.

These mental factors (cētasika) rising and falling away, along with thoughts (citta) are insubstantial and empty. Ignorant of the fact, that they are empty concepts, we accept them as real.

In order to show the emptiness of an object that has been perceived, to which we get attached, the following similes are given in the texts:

(i) the mental factor of contact (phassa) is compared to foam, a mass of small bubbles formed in a liquid,

(ii) the mental factor of feeling (vēdanā) is compared to a water bubble that forms when a drop of rain falls on a puddle of water, which bursts leaving nothing behind,

(iii) the mental factor of perception(saññā) is compared to a mirage that is seen in a dessert giving the impression of the presence of water, when there is not even a trace of it,

(iv) the mental factor of volition (cētanā), to a useless trunk of a plantain tree without a hard core, and

(v) the consciousness (viññāna) to a magician.

*************
yawares/เยาวเรศ :anjali:


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 07, 2013 3:35 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I would like to post this dhamma-article dedicated to my kalayanamitta Dr.Han Tun and my favorite actor, Paul Walker...May they be reborn in heaven enjoying celestial life.


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The Four Aasavas Are The Cause Of Avijjaa
[Presented by Dr.Han Tun @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


In Dependent Origination the four aasavas are the cause of avijjaa. In the
Essence of Buddha Abhidhamma, Dr Mehm Tin Mon wrote:

In expounding the Law of Dependent Origination, Buddha began with
avijjaa (ignorance) and went on explaining that because of avijjaa san"nkhaara
arises; because of sa"nkhaara vi~n~naa.na arises; and so on. So one would
enquire whether avijjaa is the first cause or there is another cause for
avijjaa. The answer is definite: avijjaa is not the first cause and the four
aasavas (cankers or intoxicants) are the cause of avijjaa.

The four aasavas are kaamaasava (attachment to sensual pleasures), bhavaasava
(attachment to jhaanas and brahma existence), di.t.thaasava (false views) and
avijjaasava (ignorance).

When a great loss in our property or close relatives occurs, great sorrow
(soka), lamentation (parideva), grief (domanassa) and despair (upaayaasa) arise
in our mind. This shows how attachment to our property and relatives
(kaamaasava) conditions sorrow, lamentation, grief and despair to arise.

Also when brahmas, who live in jhaana peace, approach death, they feel scared
and sad. Thus sorrow, grief and despair also arise in them and this arising is a
consequence of bhavaasava.

Those, who cling to false views such as sakkaaya-di.t.thi (personality-belief)
taking the body or the mind as 'I', feel sad or angry when something is wrong
with the body or the mind. Thus di.t.thaasava also causes sorrow or worry,
lamentation, grief and despair to arise.

Also on account of ignorance about the true nature of mentality and
corporeality, sorrow, lamentation, grief and despair arise. Thus avijjaasava is
also one of the causes for the arising of soka, parideva, domanassa, upaayaasa,
etc.

Now when soka, parideva, domanassa, and upaayaasa arise, akusala cittas also
arise. Since moha (avijjaa) is associated with all these akusala cittas, avijjaa
also arises.

Thus on account of the four aasavas, soka, parideva, domanassa and upaayaasa
arise, and when soka, parideva, domanassa and upaayaasa arise, avijjaa also
arises. Thus the four aasavas are the cause of avijjaa.


**********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep/เยาวเรศ :heart:


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 07, 2013 3:46 pm 
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Posts: 2552
Simon E. wrote:
All these excerpts may or may not in context accurately represent the Theravada view;.
What is less clear to me is what light they shed on the Mahayana/Vajrayana view.
And the header says that Dharma Wheel is a Mahayana and Vajrayana forum.

Would this not be more suitable on Dhamma Wheel ?



Bump. Just a friendly suggestion. :shrug:


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 20, 2013 3:54 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I think I have more wholesome actions than unwholesome in everyday-life. And I'm so attached to my home-theatre..may be too much.

Image

Mind-Matter, and Meditation
[written By Charles.S.Perera]


What is a wholesome act (kusala kamma) ?

Generally one calls a wholesome act, a meritorious act, which is an act deserving a recompense. Good health, righteousness, being well disciplined, being skilful, are the results of wholesome action. All our actions, be they bodily, verbal or mental through out our wakeful life are either wholesome(kusala) or (more often) unwholesome (akusala kamma). But if we live mindfully conscious of our actions, be they physical, verbal or mental, we may be able to understand and sympathise with others however they behave towards us, and thereby live a wholesome life, beneficial to ourselves and to others.

We may dislike people because of their unpleasant ways, bad behaviour, wickedness, or for their rude speech. But do we, who judge others, know how we ourselves behave towards others ? If we do not live mindfully, we will not know whether our thoughts are wholesome, or unwholesome, and therefore we will not know how those thoughts influence us in our relationship with others.

Greed (Lōbha)

Greed (lōbha) is the excessive desire to gain an advantage, benefit, pleasure, or happiness from possessing a thing or a person. Another word for greed, is attachment. The greed may be an easily recognisable strong feeling of desire, for an example to eat even when there is no hunger, or an alcoholic’s immoderate drinking. An ordinary feeling of desire may be that which arises with the smell of good food, the attraction towards a dress, a modern television set, or an electronic gadget.

The news of the death of some one close and dear to us brings memories of our strong attachment to that person,and the thoughts of the loss of the attachment to the pleasure of his company, causes sadness. The thoughts of sadness arising from this personal loss are unwholesome thoughts rooted in attachment (lōbha mūla akusal citta).

On the other hand the thoughts that arise in acts of loving kindness (metta), or compassion (karunā), or in giving a gift, or making an offering without expecting any thing in return are wholesome acts rooted in generosity (alōbha mūla kusala chitta). But besides these, there are also very subtle feelings of greed not easily perceptible, such as the attraction towards an object or a person, pleasant emotions arising on hearing rhythmic melodies, a sweet smell, an agreable taste, or a soft tingling touch. The anticipation of a word of appreciation from a person to whom a gift has been given, also gives rise to unwholesome thoughts rooted in greed ( lōbha mūla akusala citta).

Some of these very subtle thoughts rooted in greed are so insignificant, they often go unnoticed by us.

*************to be continued
tidathep


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 2:41 pm 
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Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

"The defilements rooted in greed or attachment (lōbha) aversion(dōsa) and delusion (mōha) are difficult to remove"!!! Oh so true, so true...so very difficult to abandon them completely!!


Image

Mind-Matter, and Meditation
[written By Charles.S.Perera]


Delusion (mōha) is invariably present in all unwholesome acts.

There are ten unwholesome courses of actions (akusala kamma patha).

The way the action is committed Unwholesome course of action
Bodily action Killing, stealing and committing unlawful sexual acts
Verbal action Lying, slandering, rude speech and foolish talk
Mental action Covetousness, ill-will and wrong views.

The opposites of these are the wholesome course of actions(kusala kamma patha)

The defilements rooted in greed or attachment (lōbha) aversion(dōsa) and delusion (mōha) are difficult to remove. They will remain as long as we have wrong views (micchā ditthi). The elimination of these defilements is a gradual process depending on wisdom acquired through mental development in the course of meditation to enter the direct path to the attainment of Noble States.

The first of the Noble State is, being a stream entrant (sōtāpanna). A stream entrant eliminates clinging to rules and rituals (sīlabbata parāmāsa), personality belief (sakkhāya ditthi) and shakes off all doubt (vicikicchā) about the Buddha, his teachings and his disciples the Sangha. He has a clear perceptive knowledge of the arising and falling away of mentality (nāma) and materiality(rūpa).

Even a stream entrant (sōtāpanna) has not eliminated greed (lōbha). Therefore he may still have unwholesome thoughts rooted in greed, even if he has no wrong views(ditthigata vippayutta). A stream entrant may also have conceit (māna), which is an unwholesome thought rooted greed. It is only an Arahat, who has eliminated all defilements, that has overcome conceit (māna).

*************to be continued
tidathep :reading:


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 30, 2013 10:25 pm 
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Ok when you retire and meditate.You face with your mind.What is the question?Whant to get rid from yourself.Than go this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmMSBn7gtiU

Haha,not to be free from somethig,free from yourself.Free from yourself.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 30, 2013 10:33 pm 
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Quote:

***************
Love Buddhas :heart:

this xddddd
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmMSBn7gtiU


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 30, 2013 10:38 pm 
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Posts: 242
you cannot separate yourself from monkey mind,from Buddha mind do not separate yourself.


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