Reflections from the Sutras

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Re: Reflections from the Sutras

Postby thornbush » Fri May 22, 2009 12:28 pm

Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
http://www.buddhistdoor.com/OldWeb/reso ... tra.htm#35
THE MIRROR IN A VALUABLE CASE
Once upon a time there was a poor and weary man who was always in debt. Insolvent, he hid himself in the wilderness where he found a valuable case full of precious things. A crystal mirror covered them. The poor man was most delighted to see them. He did not hesitate to take them. But he was frightened when he discovered a man's image in the mirror. Twisting his hands, he said, "I thought it was nothing more than on empty case. I wasn't aware of your being in the case. Don't get angry with me!"

He then gave up the whole case. So are the people from all walks of life.

Those who are weary of countless annoyances in life and persecuted by the creditors of the Transmigration Devil, want to avoid them and free from them through their belief in Buddhism. They begin to practice their faith and do good deeds just as the valuable case to the poor man. Troubled by the man's image- in the mirror, they wrongly cling to the ego taken as the real. They fall decadent and lose all their merits acquired previously from meditation, monastic grade and good deeds. Furthermore, they fail in their attainment of the Nirvana from the Three Vehicles, just like the stupid man sticking to the prejudice of the ego and abandoning their precious findings in the case.
Namo Amitabha Buddha!
thornbush
 
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Re: Reflections from the Sutras

Postby thornbush » Sat May 23, 2009 1:26 pm

Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
http://www.buddhistdoor.com/OldWeb/reso ... tra.htm#36
TO BLIND AN IMMORTAL

Once upon a time, there was a man who went to the mountains to learn Buddhist Priesthood. He succeeded in becoming an Immortal possessing five supernatural powers. His divine vision could perceive all hidden sundry treasures. Upon hearing it, the king said to one of his ministers excitedly:

"In order to add more valuable things to my treasury, could you make this man live permanently in our country?"

The stupid minister went to his man soon afterwards and took his eyes. He then went back to the king and said, "I have gouged out his eyes so he couldn't go away but stay in this country forever."

The king exclaimed, "What is important for his staying in this country is that he could perceive all hidden treasures. Now that you have gouged out his eyes, he is useless to me."

So are the people at large. Upon seeing a monk making strenuous efforts to meditate on the Fourfold stage of Mindfulness and the impurities or the human body on mountain groves, among tombs, in the wilderness or under a tree, a layman invited him home to practice by making various offerings. But in so doing, he destroys the monk's good works done before and his chance of attaining Nirvana. Therefore, he makes him lose the benefit of the eyes of Enlightenment without obtaining anything.

This is just like the fatuous minister blinding the man with no avail.
Namo Amitabha Buddha!
thornbush
 
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Re: Reflections from the Sutras

Postby thornbush » Sun May 24, 2009 8:48 am

Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
http://www.buddhistdoor.com/OldWeb/reso ... tra.htm#37
TO KILL A HERD OF CATTLE
Once upon a time, there was a man who owned two hundred fifty cows. He often took them to the pastureland for grazing. By accident, one day a cow was killed by a tiger. The cattle owner said to himself, "Now that a cow is lost, it's no longer an even number. What's the use of having them at all?"

He then drove the cattle to a high cliff and killed them all by pushing them down the cliff.

So are the vulgar people in the world.

One who observes all of Buddha's commandments breaks one commandment without any sense of shame or repentance. On the contrary, he says to himself: "Now that one commandment is broken, I'm no longer perfect. What's the use of keeping any of the others?"

All commandments are broken as a result of his ill logic. He is just like the stupid man killing all his cattle.
Namo Amitabha Buddha!
thornbush
 
Posts: 609
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Re: Reflections from the Sutras

Postby thornbush » Mon May 25, 2009 6:55 am

Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
http://www.buddhistdoor.com/OldWeb/reso ... tra.htm#38
YELLING AT WATER
Once upon a time, there was a man who was tired and thirsty from traveling. He drank some fresh running water from the wooden bucket. After he had had enough, he raised his hands in front of the water and said, "I have had enough to drink. Stop flowing!"

The water went on. Losing his temper, he yelled, "I told you to stop. Why don't you listen?"

On seeing this, an onlooker said, "You are so ignorant. Why don't you just leave?"

Thereupon, the onlooker drew him away.

So are the people at large.

One who immerges himself in transmigrations and the thirst of desire drinks salty water of the five desires. After getting tired of them, he says in those words, "Disappear, thou Five Desires. Don't let me see you again, I've told you. Why are you still present?"

A wise man tells him, "You can keep the Five Desires away by controlling your six organs of senses2 or by closing your mind and thought to them. Then illusions will not arise and consequently Enlightenment may be attained. Why do you need to tell "Desires" to be out of your sight and to disappear?"

This is just like the story of the man yelling at the water.
Namo Amitabha Buddha!
thornbush
 
Posts: 609
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Re: Reflections from the Sutras

Postby thornbush » Wed May 27, 2009 6:13 am

Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
http://www.buddhistdoor.com/OldWeb/reso ... tra.htm#39
HOUSE PAINTING
Once upon a time, there was a man who went to another man's house, which had just been painted, and the floor made even. It was nice and clean. He asked the host, "With what paint did you make the wall so white and beautiful?"

The host replied, "I mixed rice bran with water and day. The beauty is the result."

To himself, the guest said, "It would be better if he had used rice grain instead of bran. The wall would be more smooth and more beautiful."

He then used his own formula on his own house. The walls turned out to be concave and convex with cracks on them.

The stupid man thus wasted all his rice grain. It had better have done alms-giving to obtain any merits.

So are the common people. Those who have heard the Saints preaching that people who do good deeds may go to Heaven after death and consequently get deliverance, commit suicide to get there. They merely 1ose their lives in vain without getting anywhere just like that stupid man with his paint.
Namo Amitabha Buddha!
thornbush
 
Posts: 609
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:21 am

Re: Reflections from the Sutras

Postby thornbush » Sat May 30, 2009 3:59 am

Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
http://www.buddhistdoor.com/OldWeb/reso ... tra.htm#40
TO CURE BALDNESS
Once upon a time, there was a man who was completely bald. He felt very cold in winter and hot in summer. He was stung by gadflies and mosquitoes. He suffered from his baldness day and night. One day, he went to see a specialist well known for his medical and surgical practice and said, "Great Master! Would you cure my baldness?"

Taking off his hat, the doctor revealed to him that he too was bald and said, "I have the same trouble as you. If I could cure it, I would have done so with myself long time ago."

So are the people at large. Suffering from the agonies of birth, old age, sickness and death, people seek for immortality. They hear Sramanas, Brahmans etc, are the best doctors in the world who know now to cure all kinds of diseases. They go to a Brahman and say, "Would you release us from the pain of impenitence and transmigration and help us live in happiness and immortality?"

The Brahman tells them, "I also suffer from those agonies that you feel. So I'm looking for immortality, which I can't find. If I was able to make you get it, I would get it first for myself and then for you too."

The Brahman is just like the bald man getting weary in vain for his healing.
Namo Amitabha Buddha!
thornbush
 
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Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:21 am

Re: Reflections from the Sutras

Postby thornbush » Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:29 am

Continuation...
From: The Hundred Parables Sutra
http://www.buddhistdoor.com/OldWeb/reso ... tra.htm#41
PISACAH DEVILS
Once upon a time, there were two Pisacah devils who conjointly owned a suitcase, a stick and a pair of wooden shoes about which they fought for their monopoly. They were quarreling all day long without reaching a settlement.

An onlooker came over and asked, "What are the particularities of those three things that you have been fighting for so angrily?"

The two devils replied, "This suitcase of ours turns out all sorts of things such as clothes, food, bed articles used on a bed, and other living necessities. One who takes the stick can conquer his hateful enemies without encountering resistance. One who puts on these shoes will be able to fly without a hitch."

Upon hearing it, the onlooker said to the devils, "Would you please stand further away! Let me equally apportion them to you both."

The two devils moved away. Immediately the onlooker flew off snatching their suitcase and stick with the shoes on. The two devils were startled at the loss of their share. To them he said, "I got what you have been fighting for. Now you need not are any more."

Here Pisacah refers to devils and heretics.

Almsgiving applies to the suitcase that turns out all the essential things to the needs of the Five Ways of Existence such as human beings, Devas, etc.

Meditation symbolizes the stick, which can disperse or submit devils, enemies and afflictions as thieves.

Commandments observing is like the shoes that ensure rebirth in the world of Devas and men.

As for the divils and heretics, coveting the suitcase, it signifies that they labor themselves to the seeking for the reward of Enlightenment in the imperfect way, which result in nothing to be obtained.

If one can perform acts of merit together with almsgiving, commandments observing and meditation practice, he will be rid of all suffering and in turn obtain Nirvana.
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Re: Reflections from the Sutras

Postby sraddha » Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:24 am

Googling Pisacha, pisacha literally means "flesh eaters"... :twisted:
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