no intention, no-thought

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no intention, no-thought

Postby LastLegend » Sun Dec 22, 2013 11:59 am

Linjii's

―If a single intention doesn‘t arise, you climb the bodhi tree,
transform freely in the three realms, and appear at will. You will
rejoice in the Dharma, delight in samadhi, and illuminate your
body. When you think of cloth, a thousand layers of brocade are
at hand. When you think of food, a hundred flavors come forth.
Furthermore, you will never suffer unusual diseases.


Hui Neng's

Good friends, in this teaching of mine, from ancient times up to the present, all have set up no-thought as the main doctrine, non-form as the substance, and non-abiding as the basis.Non-form is to be separated from form even when associated with form. No-thought is not to think even when involved in thought. Non-abiding is the original nature of man.

Successive thoughts do not stop; prior thoughts, present thoughts, and future thoughts follow one after the other without cessation. If one instant of thought is cut off, the Dharma body separates from the physical body, and in the midst of successive thoughts there will be no place for attachment to anything. If one instant of thought clings, then successive thoughts cling; this is known as being fettered. If in all things successive thoughts do not cling, then you are unfettered. There- fore, non-abiding is made the basis.

Good friends, being outwardly separated from all forms, this is non-form. When you are separated from form, the substance of your nature is pure. Therefore, non-form is made the substance.

To be unstained in all environments is called no-thought. If on the basis of your own thoughts you separate from environment, then, in regard to things, thoughts are not produced. If you stop thinking of the myriad things, and cast aside all thoughts, as soon as one instant of thought is cut off, you will be reborn in another realm. Students, take care! Don't rest in objective things and the subjective mind. [If you do so] it will be bad enough that you yourself are in error, yet how much worse that you encourage others in their mistakes. The deluded man, however, does not himself see and slanders the teachings of the sutras.

Therefore, no-thought is established as a doctrine. Because man in his delusion has thoughts in relation to his environment, heterodox ideas stemming from these thoughts arise, and passions and false views are produced from them. Therefore this teaching has established no-thought as a doctrine.

Men of the world, separate yourselves from views; do not activate thoughts. If there were no thinking, then no-thought would have no place to exist. 'No' is the 'no' of what? 'Thought' means 'thinking' of what? 'No' is the separation from the dualism that produces the passions. 'Thought' means thinking of the original nature of True Reality? True Reality is the substance of thoughts; thoughts are the function of True Reality. If you give rise to thoughts from your self-nature, then, although you see,hear,perceive, and know, you are not stained by the manifold environments, and are always free. The Vimalakirti Sutra says: 'Externally, while distinguishing well all the forms of the various dharmas, internally he stands firm within the First Principle.'



Help with entering no-thought and no intention please?
Discuss?
:bow:
NAMO AMITABHA
NAM MO A DI DA PHAT (VIETNAMESE)
NAMO AMITUOFO (CHINESE)
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Re: no intention, no-thought

Postby Ayu » Sun Dec 22, 2013 12:12 pm

To put the things in words (= thinking, speaking) one has to grab them somehow. They are packed in boxes that are too narrow. As soon as one talkes it is false somehow.
And also intention is like grasping. It is wrong and narrowing. One can better see, what is right and what is the most important to be done, if one keeps openminded.
Because, if our mothers, who have been kind to us
From beginningless time, are suffering,
What can we do with (just) our own happiness?
From 10th of 37 Bodhisattva Practices
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Re: no intention, no-thought

Postby oushi » Sun Dec 22, 2013 1:30 pm

Bankei wrote: The unborn mind of the Buddhas that all people
receive from their parents when they're born is wonderfully
bright and illuminating.No one—and that includes all of
you—is ever separated from it.This absentmindedness of
yours is the same.
Your mind's not really somewhere else. It's
only that you haven't learned about the Buddha-mind, so
instead of just dwelling in it, you change it into various other
things
. Then even though you listen to things, you can't really
take them in—you don't really hear them. You're not absentminded,
what you're doing is making the Buddha-mind into
these other things
.



Linji wrote:As to my own actualization these days, it is truly creative and destructive. I play about with miraculous transformations,entering all circumstances, and wherever I am, I have nothing further to seek.
Circumstances could not change me. If students come to seek, I go out to look at them. They do not see me, so I put on all kinds of robes. The students at once start speculating about them, taken in by my words.
It is all very sad.
Blind shaven ones, men who have no eyes, they lay hold of the robes I am wearing — green, yellow, red or white. When I take those off and put on the robe of purity, the students cast one glance and are beside themselves with joy. And when I take it off, they are disappointed and shocked, run about frantically and complain that I go naked.
So I say to them: "Do you at all know me who puts on all these robes?"And suddenly they turn their heads and recognize me.


Formatting mine.

Every thought is intention. Every intention is desire to become. To become something new, you need to abandon what is present, which is Buddha. Next time you spot an intention arising in you, ask yourself if it is worth exchanging your Buddha nature for it.
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Re: no intention, no-thought

Postby dimeo » Sun Dec 22, 2013 11:52 pm

Successive thoughts do not stop; prior thoughts, present thoughts, and future thoughts follow one after the other without cessation. If one instant of thought is cut off, the Dharma body separates from the physical body, and in the midst of successive thoughts there will be no place for attachment to anything. If one instant of thought clings, then successive thoughts cling; this is known as being fettered. If in all things successive thoughts do not cling, then you are unfettered. There- fore, non-abiding is made the basis.


Interesting quotes. Here's a few thoughts...

If I say to myself that I need to solve this problem I face, and I must figure this out, then there's a tendency to cling to each subsequent thought as being necessary to finding peace and happiness. If instead I can 'let go' of the problem and just perform a simple action while in a mindful state of calm abiding, and can peacefully do work without 'stressing' about it.

Its enough to drive yourself crazy when thinking obsessively about something that's upsetting that happens. There's any number of things that could happen at any given moment. Say your girlfriend or boyfriend dumps you.... or during an ice storm a tree fell on your car.... you or a loved one is diagnosed with a serious illness...

So what do you do? Does obsessing about it endlessly achieve anything positive? Worrying only begets more worrying and results in an unhappy tired feeling. Buddhism teaches to seek liberation from this by practise meditation (right concentration) and living according to the Noble Eightfold Path.



To be unstained in all environments is called no-thought. If on the basis of your own thoughts you separate from environment, then, in regard to things, thoughts are not produced. If you stop thinking of the myriad things, and cast aside all thoughts, as soon as one instant of thought is cut off, you will be reborn in another realm.


If I believe that my job is everything to me (many people live for their career) I would likely become very upset if I were to learn that the company was downsizing or laying off (this has been happening very frequently for the past 5 years).

If I believe that my car is everything to me (many people are very serious about their car) I would likely become very unhappy and upset if it was damaged somehow (and car accidents happen very frequently!).

If I learn I am not defined by my environment then I am liberated and anything is possible for me.
But if I believe that I am defined by my environment, I might grow up to believe that "I'm poor" because I grew up in a ghetto. I might grow to hate wealth or wealthy people etc.
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