Dharma Wheel

A Buddhist discussion forum on Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism
It is currently Mon Dec 22, 2014 7:32 pm

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Buddhism in a 'Nutshell'
PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:21 am
Posts: 609
With reference to this thread from our sister site, here's a compendium from the Mahayana side:
The Five Vehicles
The Ten Dharma Realms
Basic Buddhist Practices: Three Poisons, Five Precepts, Ten Good Deeds & Triple Refuge
Four Noble Truths
Noble Eightfold Path & Three Practices
The Twelve Links of Dependent Origination
The Four Dharma Seals/The Three Marks of Existence
The Five Aggregates
The Thirty-Seven Factors of Enlightenment/The Thirty-Seven Conditions of the Bodhi Way
The Bodhisattva & Four Universal/Repentance Vows
The Four Immeasurables and Four Persuasions
The Six Paramitas
The Five Sciences
The Tripitaka/The Twelve Canon Divisions/The Nine Canon Divisions


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:21 am
Posts: 609
The Shastra on the Door to Understanding the Hundred Dharmas
Derived and condensed from: http://cttbusa.org/100shastra/100dharmas.asp
Quote:
As the World Honored One has said,
“All dharmas have no self.” What are “all dharmas,” and what is meant by “having no self”?
Quote:
All dharmas may be generally grouped into five categories.
I. Mind Dharmas (citta-dharmah).
II. Dharmas Belonging to the Mind (chaitasika-dharmah).
III. Form Dharmas (rupa-dharmah).
IV. Activities Dharmas Non-interactive with the Mind (citta-viprayukta-samskara-dharmah).
V. Unconditioned Dharmas (asamskrita-dharmah).


They are in this sequence because
the first are supreme,
the second interact with the first,
the third are the shadows manifest by the previous two,
the fourth are separate from the positions of the previous three,
and the fifth are revealed by the previous four

Quote:
The first, Mind Dharmas, include in general eight:
1. the eye consciousness (cakshur-vijnana);
2. the ear consciousness (shrotra-vijnana);
3. the nose consciousness (ghrana-vijnana);
4. the tongue consciousness (jihva-vijnana);
5. the body consciousness (kaya-vijnana);
6. the mind consciousness (mano-vijnana);
7. the manas consciousness (manas-vijnana); and
8. the alaya consciousness (alaya-vijnana).

Quote:
The second, Dharmas Belonging to the Mind, include, in general, fifty-one.
They are grouped into six categories:

1. Five universally interactive (sarvatraga);
2. Five particular states (viniyata);
3. Eleven wholesome (kushala);
4. Six fundamental afflictions (klesha);
5. Twenty derivative afflictions (upaklesha); and,
6. Four unfixed (aniyata).

One, the five universally interactive are:
1. attention (manaskara);
2. contact (sparsha);
3. feeling (vedana);
4. thinking (samjna); and,
5. deliberation (cetana).

Two, the five particular states are:
1. desire (chanda);
2. resolution (adhimoksha);
3. recollection (smriti);
4. concentration (samadhi); and,
5. judgment (prajna).

Three, the eleven wholesome dharmas are:
1. faith (shraddha);
2. vigor (virya);
3. remorse (hri);
4. shame (apatrapya);
5. absence of greed (alobha);
6. absence of anger (advesha);
7. absence of foolishness (amoha);
8. light ease (prashrabdhi);
9. non-laxness (apramada);
10. renunciation (upeksha); and,
11. non-harming (ahimsa).

Four, the six fundamental afflictions are:
1. greed (raga);
2. anger (pratigha);
3. foolishness (moha);
4. arrogance (mana);
5. doubt (vichikitsa); and,
6. improper views (drishti).

Five, the twenty derivative afflictions are:
1. wrath (krodha);
2. hatred (upanaha);
3. rage (pradasa);
4. covering (mraksha);
5. deceit (maya);
6. flattery (shathya);
7. conceit (mada);
8. harming (vihimsa);
9. jealousy (irshya);
10. stinginess (matsarya);
11. lack of remorse (ahrikya);
12. lack of shame (anapatrapya);
13. lack of faith (ashraddhaya);
14. laziness (kausidya);
15. laxness (pramada);
16. torpor (styana);
17. restlessness (auddhatya);
18. distraction (mushitasmriti);
19. improper knowledge (asamprajanya); and,
20. scatteredness (vikshepa).

Six, the four unfixed are:
1. sleep (middha);
2. regret (kaukritya);
3. investigation (vitarka); and,
4. examination (vichara)


Last edited by thornbush on Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:21 am
Posts: 609
Quote:
The third is the Form Dharmas. In general, there are eleven kinds:
1. eyes (cakshus);
2. ears (shrotra);
3. nose (ghrana);
4. tongue (jihva);
5. body (kaya);
6. forms (rupa);
7. sounds (shabda);
8. smells (gandha);
9. flavors (rasa);
10. objects of touch (sprashtavya); and,
11. dharmas pertaining to form (dharmayatanikani-rupani).

Quote:
The fourth is Activities Dharmas Non-interactive with the Mind. In general, there are twenty-four:
* attainment (prapti);
* life-faculty (jivitendriya);
* generic similarity (nikaya-sabhaga);
* dissimilarity (visabhaga);
* the No-thought Samadhi (asamjnisamapatti);
* the Samadhi of Extinction (nirodhasamapatti);
* the Reward of No-Thought (asamjnika);
* bodies of nouns (namakaya);
* bodies of sentences (padakaya);
* bodies of phonemes (vyanjanakaya);
* birth (jati);
* dwelling (sthiti);
* aging (jara);
* impermanence (anityata);
* revolving (pravritti);
* distinction (pratiniyama);
* interaction (yoga);
* speed (java);
* sequence (anukrama);
* time (kala);
* direction (desha);
* numeration (samkhya);
* combination (samagri); and,
* discontinuity (anyathatva).

Quote:
The fifth is the Unconditioned Dharmas, of which there are, in general, six:
1. unconditioned empty space (akasha);
2. unconditioned extinction attained by selection (pratisamkhyanirodha);
3. unconditioned extinction that is unselected (apratisamkhyanirodha);
4. unconditioned unmoving extinction (aninjya);
5. unconditioned extinction of feeling and thinking (samjnavedayitanirodha); and,
6. unconditioned True Thusness (tathata).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:21 am
Posts: 609
Quote:
What is meant by there being no self?
There are, in general, two kinds of Non-self:
one,the Non-self of Pudgala, and two, the Non-self of Dharmas.

Read on:
Commentary on "The Shastra on the Door to Understanding the Hundred Dharmas"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:53 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 4:23 pm
Posts: 2106
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Lots of overlap between the Theravada/Mahayana. :thumbsup:

It is interesting that in the Mahayana there are 6 paramitas, whereas in Theravada there are 10.

It seems Mahayana has combined some of them and then that there is no renunciation paramita in Mahayana as it is sometimes more leaning toward lay people.

_________________
Image
www.TheDhamma.com/
Dhamma Wiki encyclopedia
Dhamma Wheel forum


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 9:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:23 pm
Posts: 58
No disrespect intended, but here is a somewhat smaller 'nutshell' I wrote for a teenager who came here to snoop the edges of "Buddhism." FWIW

BUDDHISM

The truth of Buddhism does not come from a book. It does not come from a temple. It does not come from someone else. It is not written on a piece of paper. The truth of Buddhism comes from the individual effort to investigate, verify and actualize a clear understanding of this life.

Shakyamuni Buddha, the man most often referred to as the founder of Buddhism, was born on the border of India and Nepal in about 565 BC. He attained what is sometimes called enlightenment at 35 and preached until his death at 80. Many schools of Buddhism sprang from his teachings … in India, Tibet, China, Korea and Japan among others. Uncertain estimates put Buddhist numbers at about 350 million worldwide.

All Buddhist schools agree on at least two things:

1. THE FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS: These are observations about the world around us.

The Four Noble Truths are:

*** 1. There is suffering (dukkha – the uncertainties and doubts that life can dish up); 2. There is a cause of suffering; 3. There is an end to suffering; 4. There is a way to end suffering.

2. THE EIGHTFOLD PATH: These are the tools suggested as most useful when seeking out a truly peaceful life in a changing world.

The Eightfold Path is:

*** 1. Right View 2. Right Intention 3. Right Speech 4. Right Action 5. Right Livelihood 6. Right Effort 7. Right Mindfulness 8. Right Concentration.

The word "right" is sometimes translated as "complete." A “complete” effort is thorough-going and whole-hearted. Nothing is held back. Buddhism is not a threat-based persuasion: You won’t go to heaven (right) if you practice it and you won’t go to hell (wrong) if you don’t.

The Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path carry with them the verifiable observation that everything in life changes. There is nothing that does not change. Joy turns to sorrow, love turns to anger, birth turns to death, and the family car always gets a flat. All Buddhist schools agree on such things, but how they approach them may vary.

But as the Dalai Lama put it once, "Everyone wants to be happy." And that is probably as good a summary of the Buddhism as any.

_________________
Smile just one smile.

Blog

Book: Answer Your Love Letters: Footnotes to a Zen Practice


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2009 1:19 am 
Offline
Founding Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:54 pm
Posts: 1229
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Greetings,

TheDhamma wrote:
t is interesting that in the Mahayana there are 6 paramitas, whereas in Theravada there are 10.

It seems Mahayana has combined some of them and then that there is no renunciation paramita in Mahayana as it is sometimes more leaning toward lay people.


Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised if Mahayana Buddhism came up with the paramitas, and the Theravada commentarial tradition just copied them back.

Metta,
Retro. :)

_________________
Live in concord, with mutual appreciation, without disputing, blending like milk and water, viewing each other with kindly eyes

Dhamma Wheel (Theravada forum) * Here Comes Trouble


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 2:40 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 05, 2009 4:23 pm
Posts: 2106
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
retrofuturist wrote:
Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised if Mahayana Buddhism came up with the paramitas, and the Theravada commentarial tradition just copied them back.


:jawdrop:

(just kidding) :D

That would be great if that theory is true; I like the overlaps that sometimes show and how both traditions can learn from each other.

_________________
Image
www.TheDhamma.com/
Dhamma Wiki encyclopedia
Dhamma Wheel forum


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 6:05 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:21 am
Posts: 609
Quote:
...how both traditions can learn from each other.

Indeed and this is the most important and useful part in my opinion :thumbsup:


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Asbestos Buddha, Inge, mutsuk, palchi, Sherlock, Tenzin Dorje and 20 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group