World Chess Championship 2013

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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Tue Nov 12, 2013 4:04 pm

Game 3, Carlsen–Anand, ½–½

Réti Opening, King's Indian Attack (ECO A07)

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 g6 3.c4 dxc4 4.Qa4+ Nc6 5.Bg2 Bg7 6.Nc3 e5 7.Qxc4 Nge7 8.0–0 0–0 9.d3 h6 10.Bd2 Nd4 11.Nxd4 exd4 12.Ne4 c6 13.Bb4 Be6 14.Qc1 Bd5 15.a4 b6 16.Bxe7 Qxe7 17.a5 Rab8 18.Re1 Rfc8 19.axb6 axb6 20.Qf4 Rd8 21.h4 Kh7 22.Nd2 Be5 23.Qg4 h5 24.Qh3 Be6 25.Qh1 c5 26.Ne4 Kg7 27.Ng5 b5 28.e3 dxe3 29.Rxe3 Bd4 30.Re2 c4 31.Nxe6+ fxe6 32.Be4 cxd3 33.Rd2 Qb4 34.Rad1 Bxb2 35.Qf3 Bf6 36.Rxd3 Rxd3 37.Rxd3 Rd8 38.Rxd8 Bxd8 39.Bd3 Qd4 40.Bxb5 Qf6 41.Qb7+ Be7 42.Kg2 g5 43.hxg5 Qxg5 44.Bc4 h4 45.Qc7 hxg3 46.Qxg3 e5 47.Kf3 Qxg3+ 48.fxg3 Bc5 49.Ke4 Bd4 50.Kf5 Bf2 51.Kxe5 Bxg3+ ½–½

Match score: 1.5-1.5 (three draws)

According to some commentators, Anand possibly missed a chance for a victory.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby plwk » Tue Nov 12, 2013 4:26 pm

Carlsen Carlsen Carlsen...
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Wed Nov 13, 2013 5:33 am

Carlsen has found a way to distract Anand . . .


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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Wed Nov 13, 2013 4:50 pm

Game 4, Anand-Carlsen, 1/2-1/2

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Bd7 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Nc3 Kc8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Rd2 c5 15. Rad1 Be6 16. Ne1 Ng6 17. Nd3 b6 18. Ne2 Bxa2 19. b3 c4 20. Ndc1 cxb3 21. cxb3 Bb1 22. f4 Kb7 23. Nc3 Bf5 24. g4 Bc8 25. Nd3 h5 26. f5 Ne7 27. Nb5 hxg4 28. hxg4 Rh4 29. Nf2 Nc6 30. Rc2 a5 31. Rc4 g6 32. Rdc1 Bd7 33. e6 fxe6 34. fxe6 Be8 35. Ne4 Rxg4+ 36. Kf2 Rf4+ 37. Ke3 Rf8 38. Nd4 Nxd4 39. Rxc7+ Ka6 40. Kxd4 Rd8+ 41. Kc3 Rf3+ 42. Kb2 Re3 43. Rc8 Rdd3 44. Ra8+ Kb7 45. Rxe8 Rxe4 46. e7 Rg3 47. Rc3 Re2+ 48. Rc2 Ree3 49. Ka2 g5 50. Rd2 Re5 51. Rd7+ Kc6 52. Red8 Rge3 53. Rd6+ Kb7 54. R8d7+ Ka6 55. Rd5 Re2+ 56. Ka3 Re6 57. Rd8 g4 58. Rg5 Rxe7 59. Ra8+ Kb7 60. Rag8 a4 61. Rxg4 axb3 62. R8g7 Ka6 63. Rxe7 Rxe7 64. Kxb3 ½-½

Almost 5.5 hours! An almost victory for Carlsen. He had a pawn up from the middle game. Now both players have just narrowly missed a victory.

Match score: 2-2 (4 games, 4 draws)
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby Clarence » Wed Nov 13, 2013 5:31 pm

Nice game. I was rooting for Carlsen but it wasn't meant to be. Guess now that Kasparov has arrived things might change. We will see what happens next game when Anand plays Black.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby catmoon » Thu Nov 14, 2013 12:03 pm

I don't know how accurate those computer game evaluations are, but they are fascinating to watch move by move. In the last two games there was a pattern where one player would reel off a string of optimal moves and gain about a half pawn advantage. That would hold for a few moves then there would be a minor inaccuracy answered by another minor inaccuracy and the game would level out. I think what we are seeing is a player presses for advantage, things get hairy, and at some point they both bail out of the line due to complexity and time pressure. I think these minor inaccuracies, noted by both computers and human commentators, are not so much errors as wise choices made by players with immense experience manipulating the complexity level and time pressure of the game to their own advantage.

And interesting thing about the computers - they are looking about 25 moves ahead, and several times in each game the following will occur:

The computer projects an optimal line and both players follow it for six to ten moves... and in the middle of it the computer evaluation suddenly shifts about a half pawn. This seems to mean that even with a 25 move horizon, surprises still come over that horizon, causing re-evaluation. It also means the players have the functional equivalent of a 25 move look-ahead.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby Clarence » Thu Nov 14, 2013 4:02 pm

catmoon wrote: things get hairy,


I couldn't resist:

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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby catmoon » Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:26 am

Lol. What beautiful cat! And a thinker too it would seem. And a very appropriate interlude to fill a rest day in the championship. Tnks!
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Nov 15, 2013 4:52 am

catmoon wrote:And a very appropriate interlude to fill a rest day in the championship. Tnks!


The rest days give me a chance to get some rest too. The games are played at 3 pm (1500 hrs.) local Chennai time, which unfortunately is 1:30 am (030) for me here in the U.S. To watch it live I pretty much have to stay up the whole night.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby plwk » Fri Nov 15, 2013 6:16 am

And a very appropriate interlude to fill a rest day in the championship. Tnks!


The rest days give me a chance to get some rest too. The games are played at 3 pm (1500 hrs.) local Chennai time, which unfortunately is 1:30 am (030) for me here in the U.S. To watch it live I pretty much have to stay up the whole night.
Well, I know of football fans who would wake up at 3am for a live match and turn up at 8am for work with preta like faces, a case of the jiva is willing but the anga is weak huh :tongue:
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Nov 15, 2013 4:08 pm

Game 5

Queen's Gambit Declined, Semi-Slav, Marshall Gambit

1. c4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 c6 4. e4 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Bb4+ 6. Nc3 c5 7. a3 Ba5 8. Nf3 Nf6 9. Be3 Nc6 10. Qd3 cxd4 11. Nxd4 Ng4 12. O-O-O Nxe3 13. fxe3 Bc7 14. Nxc6 bxc6 15. Qxd8+ Bxd8 16. Be2 Ke7 17. Bf3 Bd7 18. Ne4 Bb6 19. c5 f5 20. cxb6 fxe4 21. b7 Rab8 22. Bxe4 Rxb7 23. Rhf1 Rb5 24. Rf4 g5 25. Rf3 h5 26. Rdf1 Be8 27. Bc2 Rc5 28. Rf6 h4 29. e4 a5 30. Kd2 Rb5 31. b3 Bh5 32. Kc3 Rc5+ 33. Kb2 Rd8 34. R1f2 Rd4 35. Rh6 Bd1 36. Bb1 Rb5 37. Kc3 c5 38. Rb2 e5 39. Rg6 a4 40. Rxg5 Rxb3+ 41. Rxb3 Bxb3 42. Rxe5+ Kd6 43. Rh5 Rd1 44. e5+ Kd5 45. Bh7 Rc1+ 46. Kb2 Rg1 47. Bg8+ Kc6 48. Rh6+ Kd7 49. Bxb3 axb3 50. Kxb3 Rxg2 51. Rxh4 Ke6 52. a4 Kxe5 53. a5 Kd6 54. Rh7 Kd5 55. a6 c4+ 56. Kc3 Ra2 57. a7 Kc5 58. h4 Kd5 1-0

Carlsen wins game 5 ! ! !

Match score: 3-2

FInally after 4 draws there is a victory for one of the players. The game was very even all the way to about move 40. Many top players probably would have offered or accepted a draw up to around 40 or further, but Carlsen pushed on and attained victory.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby catmoon » Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:13 pm

David N. Snyder wrote:
FInally after 4 draws there is a victory for one of the players. The game was very even all the way to about move 40. Many top players probably would have offered or accepted a draw up to around 40 or further, but Carlsen pushed on and attained victory.


Do I see an emerging pattern here? It looks as if Carlsen is simply superior in the end game and knows it, and is just pushing through the midgame hoping to apply his strength in the end game. Players at all levels do this...
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:54 pm

catmoon wrote:Do I see an emerging pattern here? It looks as if Carlsen is simply superior in the end game and knows it, and is just pushing through the midgame hoping to apply his strength in the end game. Players at all levels do this...


:thumbsup: I think you are right about that. Also, I have heard Anand is the stronger rapid/blitz player. If it is tied at the end of 12 games, it will go to those rapid games in the tie-break and Carlsen doesn't want that; so probably pushed hard in this game, playing white.

The following current & former "undisputed" world chess champions were also at the top of the chess ratings list:

Fischer, Karpov, Kasparov, and Anand

That is the complete list of champions who at the time were also at the top according to the elo chess ratings too. Carlsen will join this illustrious list if he wins this match. Carlsen's current elo rating is 2870 which is nearly 100 points higher than Anand.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby catmoon » Sat Nov 16, 2013 1:55 pm

David N. Snyder wrote:
That is the complete list of champions who at the time were also at the top according to the elo chess ratings too. Carlsen will join this illustrious list if he wins this match. Carlsen's current elo rating is 2870 which is nearly 100 points higher than Anand.


Some commentators were talking about how difficult it would be for Carlsen to raise his rating. There just aren't enough 2800+ players to support such a push. As things sit Carlsen would almost need stop having drawn games to advance his rating.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Sat Nov 16, 2013 3:28 pm

Game 6

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 O-O 6. O-O Re8 7. Re1 a6 8. Ba4 b5 9. Bb3 d6 10. Bg5 Be6 11. Nbd2 h6 12. Bh4 Bxb3 13. axb3 Nb8 14. h3 Nbd7 15. Nh2 Qe7 16. Ndf1 Bb6 17. Ne3 Qe6 18. b4 a5 19. bxa5 Bxa5 20. Nhg4 Bb6 21. Bxf6 Nxf6 22. Nxf6+ Qxf6 23. Qg4 Bxe3 24. fxe3 Qe7 25. Rf1 c5 26. Kh2 c4 27. d4 Rxa1 28. Rxa1 Qb7 29. Rd1 Qc6 30. Qf5 exd4 31. Rxd4 Re5 32. Qf3 Qc7 33. Kh1 Qe7 34. Qg4 Kh7 35. Qf4 g6 36. Kh2 Kg7 37. Qf3 Re6 38. Qg3 Rxe4 39. Qxd6 Rxe3 40. Qxe7 Rxe7 41. Rd5 Rb7 42. Rd6 f6 43. h4 Kf7 44. h5 gxh5 45. Rd5 Kg6 46. Kg3 Rb6 47. Rc5 f5 48. Kh4 Re6 49. Rxb5 Re4+ 50. Kh3 Kg5 51. Rb8 h4 52. Rg8+ Kh5 53. Rf8 Rf4 54. Rc8 Rg4 55. Rf8 Rg3+ 56. Kh2 Kg5 57. Rg8+ Kf4 58. Rc8 Ke3 59. Rxc4 f4 60. Ra4 h3 61. gxh3 Rg6 62. c4 f3 63. Ra3+ Ke2 64. b4 f2 65. Ra2+ Kf3 66. Ra3+ Kf4 67. Ra8 Rg1 0-1

Carlsen wins game 6 !!!

Match score: 4-2

Back to back victories for Carlsen; rare at this level and Carlsen was playing black.

There are only 6 games left in the match. Carlsen only needs 2.5 more points to win the match, which he could do with simply 5 draws. Or he could even lose one game and draw the rest and still win the match. It looks like we will be seeing a new champion soon.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby catmoon » Sat Nov 16, 2013 8:51 pm

So will Magnus drop into draw mode, or will he keep fighting hard? These long grinds have to be hard on him too, though they are even harder on Anand.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:26 pm

Game 7

Draw

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6 dxc6 6. Nbd2 Bg4 7. h3 Bh5 8. Nf1 Nd7 9. Ng3 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 g6 11. Be3 Qe7 12. O-O-O O-O-O 13. Ne2 Rhe8 14. Kb1 b6 15. h4 Kb7 16. h5 Bxe3 17. Qxe3 Nc5 18. hxg6 hxg6 19. g3 a5 20. Rh7 Rh8 21. Rdh1 Rxh7 22. Rxh7 Qf6 23. f4 Rh8 24. Rxh8 Qxh8 25. fxe5 Qxe5 26. Qf3 f5 27. exf5 gxf5 28. c3 Ne6 29. Kc2 Ng5 30. Qf2 Ne6 31. Qf3 Ng5 32. Qf2 Ne6

Match score: 4.5-2.5

No more than 5 games left (Carlsen only needs 2 more points, which can be 2 wins or 4 draws, to win the Match)
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Tue Nov 19, 2013 1:13 pm

Game 8, Carlsen–Anand, ½–½

Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. 0-0 Nxe4 5. Re1 Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nxe5 8. Rxe5 0-0 9. d4 Bf6 10. Re1 Re8 11. c3 Rxe1 12. Qxe1 Ne8 13. Bf4 d5 14. Bd3 g6 15. Nd2 Ng7 16. Qe2 c6 17. Re1 Bf5 18. Bxf5 Nxf5 19. Nf3 Ng7 20. Be5 Ne6 21. Bxf6 Qxf6 22. Ne5 Re8 23. Ng4 Qd8 24. Qe5 Ng7 25. Qxe8+ Nxe8 26. Rxe8+ Qxe8 27. Nf6+ Kf8 28. Nxe8 Kxe8 29. f4 f5 30. Kf2 b5 31. b4 Kf7 32. h3 h6 33. h4 h5 ½–½

Match score: 5-3 for Carlsen in a best of 12 series

Carlsen needs 1.5 more points to take the World Championship match which could happen with either 3 draws, 1 win + 1 draw, or even 1 loss + 3 draws
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby catmoon » Wed Nov 20, 2013 6:16 am

David N. Snyder wrote:Game 8, Carlsen–Anand, ½–½

Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. 0-0 Nxe4 5. Re1 Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nxe5 8. Rxe5 0-0 9. d4 Bf6 10. Re1 Re8 11. c3 Rxe1 12. Qxe1 Ne8 13. Bf4 d5 14. Bd3 g6 15. Nd2 Ng7 16. Qe2 c6 17. Re1 Bf5 18. Bxf5 Nxf5 19. Nf3 Ng7 20. Be5 Ne6 21. Bxf6 Qxf6 22. Ne5 Re8 23. Ng4 Qd8 24. Qe5 Ng7 25. Qxe8+ Nxe8 26. Rxe8+ Qxe8 27. Nf6+ Kf8 28. Nxe8 Kxe8 29. f4 f5 30. Kf2 b5 31. b4 Kf7 32. h3 h6 33. h4 h5 ½–½

Match score: 5-3 for Carlsen in a best of 12 series

Carlsen needs 1.5 more points to take the World Championship match which could happen with either 3 draws, 1 win + 1 draw, or even 1 loss + 3 draws


Say.... is this the line of the Ruy Lopez that lays claim to being the most deeply analyzed opening? There is a line something like this that is practically forcing from around move 10 on to the endgame, which is very drawish. I wonder if this is it. If so, Anand cannot allow it to be played again. Unless of course, the alternatives are even more drawish. Anand is SO behind the eight ball here. If the kind of opening he needs now actually existed, everyone would be playing it and winning with it. So he has to innovate and do it so brilliantly that it overpowers even Magnus Carlsen in a drawing mood. He can't even hope much for blunders. Carlsen has terrific stamina and seems to thrive on six-hour grindfests.

According to gambling sites, assuming I read the numbers right, right now Anand is a 14-1 longshot to retain his title.
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Re: World Chess Championship 2013

Postby David N. Snyder » Wed Nov 20, 2013 9:39 pm

I think so, but not sure since I am no expert at the openings. I prefer the displacement variants where the pieces in the back rows are randomly place and that way chess strategies start from move number one; such as Fischer960 or my variant, D-Chess.
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