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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2013 6:12 pm 
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dear all

Can you try to locate the Sanskrit paragraph which is the equivalent of this paragraph:

Quote:
Moreover, while a Bodhisattva either actually contemplates those deep stations, i.e., the three doors to deliverance, or become desirous of contemplating them, he should in his mind form the following aspiration: “For a long time those beings, because they have the notion of existence, course in the apprehension of basis. After I have won full enlightenment I shall demonstrate dharma to those beings so that they may forsake the erroneous views about a basis.” As a free agent he then enters into the concentration on emptiness, on the Signless, on the Wishless. A Bodhisattva who is thus endowed with this thought of enlightenment and with skill in means does not midway realise the reality-limit. On the contrary, he does not lose his concentration on friendliness, compassion, sympathetic joy and impartiality. For, upheld by skill in means, he increases his pure dharma more and more. His faith, etc., becomes keener and keener, and he acquires the powers, the limbs of enlightenment, and the path. [377]


I need to know the Sanskrit words for the words that are bold-faced above that is: friendliness, compassion, sympathetic joy and impartiality

And here is the Sanskrit scripture for your ease of reference.
http://www.dsbcproject.org/node/4374

Many thanks :thanks:


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2013 6:18 pm 
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahmavihara

here you can find them.

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In so far as the Ultimate, or the true nature of being is concerned,
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He who frees himself from fear and hope, evil and virtue,
will realize the insubstantial and groundless nature of confusion.
Samsara will then appear as the mahamudra itself….

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:10 am 
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HappyChan339 wrote:
dear all

Can you try to locate the Sanskrit paragraph which is the equivalent of this paragraph:

Quote:
Moreover, while a Bodhisattva either actually contemplates those deep stations, i.e., the three doors to deliverance, or become desirous of contemplating them, he should in his mind form the following aspiration: “For a long time those beings, because they have the notion of existence, course in the apprehension of basis. After I have won full enlightenment I shall demonstrate dharma to those beings so that they may forsake the erroneous views about a basis.” As a free agent he then enters into the concentration on emptiness, on the Signless, on the Wishless. A Bodhisattva who is thus endowed with this thought of enlightenment and with skill in means does not midway realise the reality-limit. On the contrary, he does not lose his concentration on friendliness, compassion, sympathetic joy and impartiality. For, upheld by skill in means, he increases his pure dharma more and more. His faith, etc., becomes keener and keener, and he acquires the powers, the limbs of enlightenment, and the path. [377]


I need to know the Sanskrit words for the words that are bold-faced above that is: friendliness, compassion, sympathetic joy and impartiality

And here is the Sanskrit scripture for your ease of reference.
http://www.dsbcproject.org/node/4374

Many thanks :thanks:



Hi,

In Vaidya's edition, pp. 185-186:

punaraparaṃ subhūte yadā bodhisattvo mahāsattva imāni gambhīrāṇi sthānāni pratyavekṣate, pratyavekṣitukāmo vā bhavati-tadyathā śūnyatāṃ samādhivimokṣamukham, ānimittaṃ samādhivimokṣamukham, apraṇihitaṃ samādhivimokṣamukham, tenaivaṃ cittam abhinirhartavyam- “dīrgharātramamī sattvāḥ sattvasaṃjñayā upalambhe caranti| teṣāṃ sattvānāmupalambha- dṛṣṭikānāmupalambha- dṛṣṭiprahāṇāya anuttarāṃ samyaksaṃbodhim abhisaṃbudhya dharmaṃ deśayiṣyāmi” iti| saṃcintya śūnyatāṃ samādhivimokṣamukhaṃ samāpadyate, na ca bhūtakoṭiṃ sākṣātkaroti| ānimittaṃ samādhivimokṣamukhaṃ samāpadyate, na ca bhūtakoṭiṃ sākṣātkaroti| apraṇihitaṃ samādhivimokṣamukhaṃ samāpadyate, na ca bhūtakoṭiṃ sākṣātkaroti| evaṃ bodhisattvo mahāsattvo 'nena cittotpādena anena copāyakauśalyena samanvāgato nāntarā bhūtakoṭiṃ sākṣātkaroti, na ca parihīyate maitrīsamādhito na karuṇā- muditopekṣā- samādhitaḥ| tatkasya hetoḥ? upāyakauśalya- parigṛhīto hi bodhisattvo mahāsattvo bhūyasyā mātrayā vivardhate śuklair dharmaiḥ| tīkṣṇatarāṇi cāsya śraddhādīnīndriyāṇi bhavanti, bala- bodhya- mārgaṃ ca pratilabhate||

~~ Huifeng

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:18 am 
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By the way, that's in

20 upāyakauśalyamīmāṃsāparivarto viṃśatitamaḥ|

not in your link to

18 śūnyatāparivarto'ṣṭādaśaḥ

In Conze's translation, it's 20:3, pg. 225. He references Wogihara's edition (with the Abhisamayalamkara) pg. 376-377 (which appear in your own citation above). Ha! I guess you were just writing from Conze in the first place, huh?

If you're looking for some other Prajnaparamita stuff, please check out my Blog in the link in my signature line below.

~~ Huifeng

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 5:36 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2013 5:27 am
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Thankyou to everyone who have posted a reply, I am the guy who had asked for help. I did not know how to use this web last night and a great friend helped me out :thumbsup:

Is it therefore correct to say that the words in question are equivalent to:
metta
karuna
mudita, and
upekkha?

And are they together taken as parts of the concept of "compassion" required of a bodhisattva?

Many thanks again.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 8:53 am 
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jhsy wrote:
Is it therefore correct to say that the words in question are equivalent to:
metta
karuna
mudita, and
upekkha?


Yes.

Quote:
And are they together taken as parts of the concept of "compassion" required of a bodhisattva?


They are all required of a bodhisattva, but of the four, karuṇā means compassion.

The bodhisattva specifically needs great compassion (mahākaruṇā). When one spontaneously and without deliberate effort feels compassion, wishing all of the three types of sufferings of all sentient beings to be completely eliminated, in the same way as one would reject one’s own suffering, at that time the cultivation of compassion is fully developed and it acquires the name “great compassion”.

R


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2013 4:13 pm 
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Thanks a lot for a very clear and comprehensive answer.


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