Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

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Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby flowerbudh » Sun Oct 27, 2013 3:57 am

At a deeper level, it comes from dissatisfaction with the present moment, I can see this now, but how do I deal with it?
Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without. - The Buddha
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby PadmaVonSamba » Sun Oct 27, 2013 4:42 am

return to watching the breath.
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The Chinese characters are Fo (buddha) and Ming (bright). The image is of a student of Buddhism, who, imagining himself to be a monk, and not understanding the true meaning of the words takes the sound of the words literally. Likewise, People on web forums sometime seem to be foaming at the mouth.
Original painting by P.Volker /used by permission.
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby Johnny Dangerous » Sun Oct 27, 2013 5:26 am

Boredom is supposed to be exactly what you feel during shamatha, Trungpa Rinpoche said something like "seeing the vibration of your neuroses", all you can do is return to your object. Unless you're doing vipassana, then you can can use the boredom itself as an object.
"Just as a lotus does not grow out of a well-levelled soil but from the mire, in the same way the awakening mind
is not born in the hearts of disciples in whom the moisture of attachment has dried up. It grows instead in the hearts of ordinary sentient beings who possess in full the fetters of bondage." -Se Chilbu Choki Gyaltsen
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby ClearblueSky » Sun Oct 27, 2013 6:47 am

Shamatha/ Vipassana is the perfect way to learn how to deal with boredom, it will carry over into your life in general. And the way to deal with it is little bits at a time and working your way up, so the boredom doesn't just totally destroy you and discourage you from meditating.
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby hop.pala » Sun Oct 27, 2013 7:18 am

Yes because accustomed the" living" with thoughts in past or in the future.Watching the breath is good advice.
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby lobster » Sun Oct 27, 2013 8:03 am

By developing an interesting boredom.

You might not be ready for meditation? Consider prostrations, walking meditation, tai chi/qi ong, yoga or some form of attention fixing, for example breath or candle fixation.

Personally I would advise against the advice given in 'Teach yourself invisibility', which involved spending long periods of time in a closet. This might be interesting but not to be recommended. Hope this is helpful.
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby duckfiasco » Sun Oct 27, 2013 9:44 pm

Boredom has distinct physical and mental qualities.
Investigation of these qualities is by definition the antithesis of boredom.

For me, there seem to be two kinds.
One is a dull heavy blanket that makes me lean to one side or slump.
Paradoxically, at the same time the mind is exhausting itself running in circles half-awake, thinking about everything and nothing.
When I feel bored and tired it's actually because my mind is exhausting itself this way.
Noticing this and coming back to the object of meditation helps redirect all that energy.
It's amazing how bored sleepiness dissipates when re-collecting the mind onto the breath.
I'd say this boredom's root is ignorance, ignoring this present experience.
Just coming back to what you're doing is a good antidote.

The other main kind of boredom is resentful.
I don't WANT to be doing this, this chore needs to be done or that book would be a lot more interesting.
Thoughts and agitation can feel like bees trapped in a jar.
I'd say this boredom's root is aversion, obviously to meditation.
Your choice of antidotes to aversion will help.
I try to think something like, "I know this is worthwhile, and for the benefit of others. What a precious opportunity that few get! I shouldn't waste it."
Anything to engender the gratitude and energy that are helpful in meditation.

It's extremely hard to sit through agitated boredom.
But a lot of meditation is precisely this kind of fact finding.
What are the qualities of my experience?
How will I recognize them in the future and not get swept away?
What happens if I watch this rise and fall?
Usually we don't let it get to the "fall" stage before reacting, including boredom.

Also, Henepola Gunaratana said that if you're bored during breathing/walking meditation, you can rest assured that you haven't properly investigated your object.
That is, you've already made the breath or a step into a two-dimensional picture to put on a mental shelf.
It no longer reflects the vibrant vitality of experience.

Finally, one antidote to boredom that I find fascinating is being like a mental gatekeeper.
Watch your object closely, and try to notice the sensation right before the mind tries to shift to something else.
You may be surprised at what you notice. :thumbsup:
Namu Amida Butsu
The Perfect Way knows no difficulties
Except that it refuses to make preferences;
Only when freed from hate and love,
It reveals itself fully and without disguise.
- Sengcan (tr. Suzuki)
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby PadmaVonSamba » Mon Oct 28, 2013 3:55 am

I am never bored.
.
.
.
Profile Picture: "The Foaming Monk"
The Chinese characters are Fo (buddha) and Ming (bright). The image is of a student of Buddhism, who, imagining himself to be a monk, and not understanding the true meaning of the words takes the sound of the words literally. Likewise, People on web forums sometime seem to be foaming at the mouth.
Original painting by P.Volker /used by permission.
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby oushi » Mon Oct 28, 2013 8:14 am

flowerbudh wrote:At a deeper level, it comes from dissatisfaction with the present moment, I can see this now, but how do I deal with it?

Sounds like a good reason for the mind to wander and grasp after interesting phenomena.
You are very bright, or under a good guidance, if you can see it. Before dealing with it, I would ask why this dissatisfaction arise in the first place.
Say what you think about me here.
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby dimeo » Fri Nov 08, 2013 5:05 am

There's little meaning in the idea of "boredom".

Where does it reside? Look directly at this sensation. What does it look like? What colour is it? Is it a 'thing'? What makes you think it's "real"? Can you touch it? Is it just a sensation like a breeze on the skin? Is it permanent? Is it just an illusion like a mirage?
Who's bored? Where is the self that is doing this experiencing and observing? Does this 'self' really exist?

Perhaps at the very heart of it... saying "I feel bored" is hollow meaninglessness.

Personal entertainment and 'satisfaction' is rather temporary. Instead of only being aware of the (apparent) emotion of the moment, we can learn to broaden our awareness of a much larger universe.

Compassionately dedicate your life to the liberation of others from suffering...
you might find yourself kept quite busy and have little time to notice any sense of boredom!
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Re: Boredom from a Buddhist perspective

Postby Nemo » Fri Nov 08, 2013 5:38 am

At first it is a shock, hot boredom. Tough it out and it turns into cool boredom. I can waste an entire season drinking that. There is nothing to do.
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