Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Post sayings or stories you find interesting or useful.

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Thu Sep 12, 2013 4:16 pm

Andhavana : The Blind Men's Grove

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

This lovely Uposatha Day, I try to find a picture of Andhavana...Nope, no can do! But I still would like to present this interesting story and what important events happened in this forest ..... to you all.

*********
Andhavana : The Blind Men's Grove
[Palikanon.com]


A grove to the south of Sāvatthi, one gāvuta away from the city. It was well guarded and monks and nuns used to resort there in search of solitude. During the time of Kassapa Buddha, thieves waylaid an anāgāmī upāsaka in this forest; his name was Sorata, and he had been touring Jambudīpa collecting money for the Buddha's cetiya. They gouged out his eyes and killed him. Thereupon the robbers all lost their sight and wandered about the forest blind; hence the name of the forest ("Blind," usually, but wrongly, translated "Dark"). It had retained its name during two Buddha-periods.

There was a Meditation Hall (padhāna-ghara) built there for the use of contemplative monks and nuns. Stories are told of those, particularly the nuns, who were tempted by Māra in the Andhavana. E.g., ālavikā, Soma, Kisāgotamī, Vijayā, Uppalavannā, Cālā, Upacālā, Sisūpacālā, Selā, Vajirā.

Once when Anuruddha was staying there he became seriously sick. It was here that the Buddha preached to Rāhula the discourse (Cūla-Rāhulovāda) which made him an arahant.

Among others who lived here from time to time are mentioned the Elders Khema, Soma, and Sāriputta, the last-mentioned experiencing a special kind of samādhi (where he realised that bhavanirodha was nibbāna).

The Theragātha Commentary records a discussion here between Sāriputta and Punna regarding purification (visuddhikamma). The Vammikā Sutta was the result of questions put by an anāgami Brahma, his erstwhile colleague, to Kumāra-kassapa, while he was in Andhavana.

Once bandits laid an ambush for Pasenadi as he went through the forest to pay his respects to the Buddha, attended by a small escort, as was sometimes his wont. He was warned in time and had the wood surrounded, capturing and impaling or crucifying the bandits on either side of the road through the wood.

The Therī Uppalavannā was raped in a hut in the forest by a young brahmin named Ananda, and it is said that from that time nuns did not live in Andhavana.

The Pārājikā contains stories of monks who committed offences in the forest with shepherdesses and others, and also of some monks who ate the flesh of a cow which had been left behind, partly eaten, by cattle thieves. It was here that Uppalavannā obtained the piece of cow's flesh which she asked Udāyi to offer to the Buddha, giving Udāyi her inner robe as "wages" for the job.

The Pārichattakavimāna was the abode which fell to the lot of a woman who having plucked an asoka-flower, while getting firewood in Andhavana, offered it to the Buddha.

The rule forbidding monks to enter a village clad only in their waist cloth and nether garment was made with reference to a monk whose robe had been stolen by thieves in Andhavana (Vin.i.298).
-------------

On one occasion venerable Kumaara Kassapa was living in the Blind Men's Grove. [Note 275: Ven. Kumaara Kassapa was an adopted son of King Pasenadi of Kosala, born of a woman who, not knowing she was pregnant, had gone forth as a bhikkhunii after having conceived him. At the time this Vammika sutta was delivered he was still a sekha; he attained arahantship using this sutta as his subject of meditation.]

Then, when the night was well advanced, a certain deity who illuminated the whole of the Blind Men's Grove approached the venerable Kumaara Kassapa and told him a story about an Ant-hill as a riddle. [Note 276: According to the Commentary, this deity was a non-returner living in the Pure Abodes. He and Kumaara Kassapa had been members of a group of five fellow monks who, in the Dispensation of the previous Buddha Kassapa, had practised meditation together on a mountain-top.]

The first half of the sutta was about the story of the ant-hill. The deity then asked venerable Kumaara Kassapa to ask the Buddha the meaning of the story on the next day. The second half of the sutta was about the explanations given by the Buddha.

****************
Love Buddha's dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Sep 17, 2013 3:36 pm

Mara-Dhiraja : The Lord Of Paranimita-Vasavati Heaven

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

We all read stories about Mara did this.. did that to the Buddha, Rahula etc. We might think that Mara looks ugly with horns like Satan ...Oh no..no..no!! Mara is the handsome Lord of the Sixth Heaven, he's known as Lord Mara-Dhiraja or Lord Varsavati..his favorite son is Sarthavaha-Devaputta and his most beautiful daughters are Tanhā, Arati, and Raga (angels of the Sixth Heaven).

I was so happy to find the story of Mara(from Thai Tipitaka), posted in Thai by a monk @facebook:

*************
Mara-Dhiraja : The Lord Of Paranimita-Vasavati Heaven
[Thai Tipitaka]


Mara-dhiraja is a Bodhisatta who will be a future Buddha..but while he was the lord Mara-dhiraja in the Paranimita-vassavati (Sixth-Heaven), learned that all the good Brahma-devas begged Sandhusit-Deva who was in the 4th-Heaven(Tusita Heaven) to become the Gautama Buddha.This is what sparked the anger and jealousy in Mara since no Brahma-devas ever asked him to become a Buddha.

Who is Mara?

Mara is the lord only of the sixth heaven of the "desire realm"(Paranimita-vassa-vati) of the Triloka, Heaven of Freely Enjoying Things Conjured by Others. He plays a role in many stories of the Buddha and his monks. Mara is best known for his part in the historical Buddha's enlightenment.

As the about-to-be Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama, sat in meditation, Mara brought his most beautiful daughters..named Tanha, Arati, and Raga, to seduce Siddhartha. Siddhartha, however, remained in meditation. Then Mara sent vast armies of monsters to attack him. Yet Siddhartha sat still and untouched.

Image

Mara claimed that the seat of enlightenment rightfully belonged to him and not to the mortal Siddhartha. Mara's monstrous soldiers cried out together, "I am his witness!" Mara challenged Siddhartha, who will speak for you?

Then Siddhartha reached out his right hand to touch the earth, and the beautiful earth goddess itself spoke: "I bear you witness!" Mara disappeared. And as the morning star rose in the sky, Siddhartha Gautama realized enlightenment and became a Buddha.

Image

NOTE : Mae Thoranee is the Buddhist Earth Goddess who was summoned by the Buddha just prior to his enlightenment. As the Buddha was seated in deep and profound meditation under the bodhi tree he was tempted by Mara who sent her 3 beautiful daughters to seduce . Seeing the Buddha had nothing to do with temptations of the senses, Mara became angry and fearing that he would lose his power once the Buddha was enlightened and the ancient divine lost truths were revealed again, so he sent his hordes of demons to accost the Siddhartha. These forces extended to a distance of twelve yojanas to the front of the Bodhisatta, twelve to the back, and nine each to the right and to the left. Mara, thousand armed, rode on the elephant, Girimekhala, one hundred and fifty leagues in height. The demons assumed various fearsome shapes and were armed with dreadful weapons. At Mara's approach, all the various Devas, Nagas and others, who were gathered round the Bodhisatta singing his praises and paying him homage, disappeared in headlong flight. Hence the Buddha assumed the mudra of 'Touching the Earth' and the Earth Goddess came to his aid. Wringing her hair from which torrents of water manifested. Mara and his followers fled in utter rout, and the Devas and others gathered round the Buddha to celebrate his victory. The sun set on the defeat of Mara.

Mara's past life

Once upon a time, during the life of the Kassapa-Buddha, Mara was born as 'Bodhi' the advisor of King Ging-gissa. It was common knowledge that anyone who did meritorious deeds for the Buddha would receive the highest blessing. So, the king prohibited anyone from offering anything to the Buddha. This was in hopes that the king himself would be the first to offer and thus receive the highest blessings.

Bodhi and his wife wanted to be the first to give alms-food to Kassapa Buddha. They went to the Bodhi-Tree where the Buddha was sitting. But the king's guards arrested him and planned on executing him under the order of the king. Kasspa-Buddha knew Bodhi's intention to be the first to give the alms-food, so he created his image to sit under the Bodhi Tree while his real body appeared in front of Bodhi (only visible to Bodhi) and received the alms-food from Bodhi. Bodhi prayed to Kassapa Buddha that he would like to be a Buddha someday. The Kassapa Buddha put his hands on Bodhi's head and predicted that Bodhi would be a future Buddha.

After Kassapa Buddha disappeared, Bodhi was killed by the king's guard and he was reborn again and again in different heavens for a very long time....until he became Mara-Dhiraja in the sixth-Heaven.

************
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Thu Sep 19, 2013 1:57 pm

:anjali: Today is Uposatha Day....The Brahmin Who Had Been The 'Father of the Buddha' :anjali:

Sawaddee Ka

This great story makes me think of my mom and dad so much. This Uposatha Day, I would like to dedicate this amazing story to my parents..love you mom/dad..love you more than I can say :heart:

Image

The Brahmin Who Had Been The 'Father of the Buddha'
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya Tin, M.A.]


While residing at the Anjana wood, near Saketa, the Buddha uttered Verse (225) of this book, with reference to a brahmin, who claimed that the Buddha was his son.

Once, the Buddha accompanied by some bhikkhus entered the town of Saketa for alms-food. The old brahmin, seeing the Buddha, went to him and said, "O son, why have you not allowed us to see you all this long time? Come with me and let your mother also see you." So saying, he invited the Buddha to his house. On reaching the house, the wife of the brahmin said the same things tothe Buddha and introduced the Buddha as "Your big brother" to her children, and made them pay obeisance to him. From that day, the couple offered alms-food to the Buddha every day, and having heard the religious discourses, both the brahmin and his wife attained Anagami Fruition in due course.

The bhikkhus were puzzled why the brahmin couple said the Buddha was their son; so they asked the Buddha. The Buddha then replied, "Bhikkhus, they called me son because I was a son or a nephew to each of them for one thousand five hundred existences in the past." The Buddha continued to stay there, near the brahmin couple for three more months and during that lime, both the brahmin and his wife attained arahatship, and then realized parinibbana.

The bhikkhus, not knowing that the brahmin couple had already become arahats, asked the Buddha where they were reborn. To them the Buddha answered:

"Those who have become arahats are not reborn any where; they have realized Nibbana."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 225: The arahats, who do not harm others and are always restrained in their actions, go to the deathless Nibbana, where there is no sorrow.


*************
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby Aemilius » Tue Sep 24, 2013 10:20 am

tidathep wrote:NOTE : Mae Thoranee is the Buddhist Earth Goddess who was summoned by the Buddha just prior to his enlightenment. As the Buddha was seated in deep and profound meditation under the bodhi tree he was tempted by Mara who sent her 3 beautiful daughters to seduce . Seeing the Buddha had nothing to do with temptations of the senses, Mara became angry and fearing that he would lose his power once the Buddha was enlightened and the ancient divine lost truths were revealed again, so he sent his hordes of demons to accost the Siddhartha. These forces extended to a distance of twelve yojanas to the front of the Bodhisatta, twelve to the back, and nine each to the right and to the left. Mara, thousand armed, rode on the elephant, Girimekhala, one hundred and fifty leagues in height. The demons assumed various fearsome shapes and were armed with dreadful weapons. At Mara's approach, all the various Devas, Nagas and others, who were gathered round the Bodhisatta singing his praises and paying him homage, disappeared in headlong flight. Hence the Buddha assumed the mudra of 'Touching the Earth' and the Earth Goddess came to his aid. Wringing her hair from which torrents of water manifested. Mara and his followers fled in utter rout, and the Devas and others gathered round the Buddha to celebrate his victory. The sun set on the defeat of Mara.


Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Can You tell us a Sutta where the earth goddess Mae Thoranee is mentioned?
I believe that Mae Thoranee is in sanskrit Vasudhara, or Vasundhara?

Thanks, Aemilius
svaha
User avatar
Aemilius
 
Posts: 1433
Joined: Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:44 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Sep 24, 2013 4:01 pm

Aemilius wrote:
tidathep wrote:
Can You tell us a Sutta where the earth goddess Mae Thoranee is mentioned?
I believe that Mae Thoranee is in sanskrit Vasudhara, or Vasundhara?

Thanks, Aemilius

-------------------
Sawaddee Ka

I can't find Sutta where the earth goddess Mae Thoranee is mentioned..but I have beautiful pictures of Earth Goddess and Vasudhara Fall (stairway to Himalayas) for you.

Image

Image

Phra Mae Thorani (Thai: พระแม่ธรณี), Mae Phra Thorani (Thai: แม่พระธรณี) or Nang Thorani (นางธรณี), known as Wathondara (ဝသုန္ဒရာ) or Wathondare (ဝသုန္ဒရေ) in Burmese, from Pali: Vasudhara.... are Thai and Lao language names for the Khmer language Preah Thorani (Khmer: ព្រះ​ធរណី ឬ នាង​គង្ហីង​ព្រះ​ធរណី), an earth goddess of the Buddhist mythology of the region

Images of Phra Mae Thorani are common in shrines and Buddhist temples of Burma, Cambodia, Thailand and Laos. According to Buddhist myths Phra Mae Thorani is personified as a young woman wringing the cool waters of detachment out of her hair, to drown Mara, the demon sent to tempt the Buddha as he meditated under the bodhi tree.

In temple murals Phra Mae Thorani is often depicted with the Buddha in the posture of Calling the earth to witness. The waters flowing forth from her long hair wash away the armies of Mara and symbolize the water of the bodhisattva's perfection of generosity (dana parami).

-------------

Vasudhara Fall...stairway to Himalayas : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVzg3myEUJU

Image

Vasudhara Falls is a waterfall situated near Badrinath, in Uttarakhand, India. Total distance from Badrinath to Vasudhara is 8 KM. It is a 5 km walk-able trek from Mana village. Mana village is a 3 km road route from Badrinath. The height of the falls is 400 ft(122 mt). The belief is that the waters of Vasundhara falls have a tendency to swing away from a person who is unholy and not pious. These falls are associated with the Pandavas. Here, one can see the path used by Pandavas to Heaven. There are several religious places which include Vyas Cave, Ganesh Cave, and Bhim Pul near to Vasudhara Falls. Mana is usually accessible during the same time when the town of Badrinath is open to general public (usually from 2nd week of May to October or November every year) by road from Badrinath, which in turn is accessible by motor vehicles from Rishikesh, the nearest railhead. Vasundhara Falls is about 6 km away from Mana.

Medicinal value of fall water

It is proved that water from Alakananda River,(Vasudhara is part of Alakananda) is having medicinal properties after storing for 2 years and its medicinal properties are proved scientifically.[2] Traditional Hindus store this water in their house for years and believe using this water for religious practices.
------------
tidathep :namaste:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Fri Sep 27, 2013 3:29 pm

Resident Pupil From Niraya

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

Nowaday my daughter has to train young residents(doctors), she always complains to me that some residents are so lazy...and I'll say "oh resident evil" just to make my daughter laugh..(RESIDENT EVIL is a movie).

Image

Resident Pupil From Niraya
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya Tin,M.A.]


While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (61) of this book, with reference to a resident pupil of Thera Mahakassapa.

When Thera Mahakassapa was residing near Rajagaha, he had two young bhikkhus staying with him. One of them was respectful, obedient and dutiful to the thera, but the other one was not. When the old thera chided the latter for his slackness in his duties, he was very much offended. On one occasion, he went to the house of a lay-disciple of the thera, and lied to them that the thera was ill. Thus, he got some choice food from them for the thera; but he ate the food on the way. When admonished by the thera for this he was extremely angry. The next day, when the thera was out on his alms-round, the young foolish bhikkhu stayed behind, broke the pots and pans and set fire to the monastery.

When a bhikkhu from Rajagaha told the Buddha about this, the Buddha said that it would have been much better for Thera Mahakassapa to live alone than to live with a foolish companion.

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 61: If a person seeking a companion cannot find one who is better than or equal to him, let him resolutely go on alone; there can be no companionship with a fool.
----------
NOTE: Buddha's Poem #61 [By Yawares Sastri]

If you can't find a friend who is wiser or equal to you
You should better be alone..don't hang out with a fool
Foolish friend can bring you lots of trouble
There can be no relationship with a fool

At the end of the discourse, the bhikkhu from Rajagaha attained Sotapatti Fruition.

***********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Oct 02, 2013 1:38 pm

Tapussa and Bhallika: The Earliest Disciples of the Gotama Buddha

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

You might think that Sujata was the first disciple who gave alms-food to the Buddha ??? Nope, she was not !! Tapussa and Bhallika, the 2 brothers, were the first (dve vacika saranagamana)!!

Image

Tapussa and Bhallika: The Earliest Disciples of the Gotama Buddha
[Burmese Version.... by Aye Sat]


During the time of Padumuttara Buddha, future Tapussa and Bhallika aspired to be the foremost disciples of the Buddha. Then again at Sikhi-Buddha's period they wished to get the chance of offering the first alms-food to the future Buddha. They made meritorious deeds together throughout their various past lives. Finally, they became the earliest disciples of the Gotama Buddha.

Tapussa and Bhallika were the two sons of travelling merchant who resided in Pakkharavati town of Okkalapa. They travelled from place to place to trade, carrying their goods in five hundred bullock carts.

Gotama Buddha who had gained the perfect enlightenment was at the root of a linlun tree. He had just arisen from the seventh-seven days abiding in the attainment in cessation of all defilements.

At that moment, Tapussa and Bhallika were not very far from that linlun tree. Their bullock carts were immobilized by their deva mother of previous life. The deva told them about the Buddha's extreme need of food for his survival after fasting for forty nine days.

Without hesitation, Tapussa and Bhallika took the best preserved food they had and offered them to the Buddha. After having their alms-food the Buddha gave them a discourse. At the end of the discourse, both the two brothers were established in the ''Two Refuges'' (dve vacika saranagamana).

Then they asked the Buddha to give them something to revere everyday. The Buddha bestowed on them eight hairs from his head as relics. They put up a shrine on the Singuttara Hill and enshrined the hair relics with the guidance of King Okkalapa. Myanmar kings, their successors, together with the people sustained the shrine. At present, it is famous as the Shwedagon Pagoda in Myanmar.

Later in Rajagaha, they visited the Buddha. Again, the Buddha gave a discourse to them. On hearing the Dhamma, Tapussa attained Sotapatti Fruition. Bhallika became monk and then gained Arahatship.

Buddha declared that Tapussa and Bhallika were the foremost disciples who had taken refuge earliest in the Buddha and the Dhamma.

Certainly, continuous merits of Tapussa and Bhallika in all their past existences had fulfilled their aspirations of becoming the earliest disciples, offering the first alms-food to the Buddha. More than that, they also attained Fruition and Arahatship.

**********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Mon Oct 07, 2013 3:34 pm

The Story of Ahipeta

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

When I was young, there was a temple not far from Bangkok that displayed figures of how sinners being tortured in hell, though I never visited that temple, but I saw pictures in the Thai newspaper. The picture that I post today shows how petas look like(according to Thai Tipitaka).

Image

The Story of Ahipeta
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya Tin,M.A.]


While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (71) of this book, with reference to a peta-ghost.

The Chief Disciple Maha Moggallana was on one occasion going on an alms-round with Thera Lakkhana in Rajagaha. On seeing something, he smiled but said nothing. When they were back at the monastery, Thera Maha Moggallana told Thera Lakkhana that he smiled because he saw a peta-ghost with the head of a human being and the body of a snake. The Buddha then said that he himself had seen that very peta-ghost on the day he attained Buddhahood. The Buddha also explained that, a very long time ago, there was a paccekabuddha, who was respected by many. People going to his monastery had to traverse a field. The owner of the field, fearing that his field would be damaged by too many people going to and from the monastery, set fire to it. Consequently, the paccekabuddha had to move to some other place. The disciples of the paccekabuddha, being very angry with the land-owner, beat him and killed him. On his death he was reborn in Avici Niraya. In his present existence, he was serving out the remaining term of the evil consequences (kamma) as a peta-ghost.

In conclusion, the Buddha said, "An evil deed does not bear fruit immediately, but it invariably follows the evil doer. There is no escape from the consequences of an evil deed."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Buddha's Poem #71 [By Yawares Sastri]

Bad deeds not only punish evil doer in present life
But also follow him like shadow
No matter where he is reborn
His vipaka-kammas will follow

***************
:heart: Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Oct 12, 2013 12:12 pm

A Great King And A Fake Bhikkhu.......Today is Uposatha Day !

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I love this story very much, it teachs me that suspicious mind is not good. I should not let ill-thought enter my mind, I should purify my heart always!

Image

A Great King And A Fake Bhikkhu
[Posted in Thai by a monk @ facebook, Yawares translated into Thai-English]


Once upon a time, a very poor man and his pregnant wife came to rest at the pavillion outside the town. The wife was craving for the alms-food giving to monks by the king. Because of love, the husband took a risk by wearing yellow robe..disguised as a monk, and he was very careful trying so hard to behave like a serene monk. He went to the palace, the king saw this peaceful bhikkhu, with so much 'saddha', the king offered his gourmet alms-food to this bhikkhu. And the king ordered his guard to follow the bhikkhu in order to know where he lived so the king could invite him to come to have alms-food in the palace next time.

Without noticing the king's guard, the fake bhikkhu walked right back to his pregnant wife, disrobed and put on his usual clothes and gave the king's alms-food to his wife. The guard saw what was happening, he was angry with this charade but then pitied this poor husband/wife, so he just scolded them and told them not to go to the palace again.

While the guard was walking back to the palace, he thought that since the king had so much saddha/admiration in this fake bhikkhu, he should not upset the king...instead he should say that this fake bhikkhu was an ariya-monk ..to make the king happy. So when the king asked him, he said that he followed the bhikkhu outside the town and suddenly the bhikkhu just disappeared like magic. The king was so pleased thinking that he gave his alms-food to an arahant-monk which was considered a greatest meritorious deed. Later on, the king was quite sick, knowing he would die soon..the king told this favorite guard to keep offering alms-food to the serene-bhikkhu in his name always. Then the king died and was reborn in Tusita heaven.

One day, a Pacceka-Buddha went to get alms-food in the palace, the king's guard put the royal alms-food in his alms-bowl but with suspicious mind that the Pacceka-Buddha might be a fake bhikkhu(because of the former incident). And this meritorious deed turned sour and caused the guard to go to Unhappy World after he passed away.

***********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby muni » Sat Oct 12, 2013 1:02 pm

tidathep wrote:A Great King And A Fake Bhikkhu.......Today is Uposatha Day !

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I love this story very much, it teachs me that suspicious mind is not good. I should not let ill-thought enter my mind, I should purify my heart always!

Image

A Great King And A Fake Bhikkhu
[Posted in Thai by a monk @ facebook, Yawares translated into Thai-English]


Once upon a time, a very poor man and his pregnant wife came to rest at the pavillion outside the town. The wife was craving for the alms-food giving to monks by the king. Because of love, the husband took a risk by wearing yellow robe..disguised as a monk, and he was very careful trying so hard to behave like a serene monk. He went to the palace, the king saw this peaceful bhikkhu, with so much 'saddha', the king offered his gourmet alms-food to this bhikkhu. And the king ordered his guard to follow the bhikkhu in order to know where he lived so the king could invite him to come to have alms-food in the palace next time.

Without noticing the king's guard, the fake bhikkhu walked right back to his pregnant wife, disrobed and put on his usual clothes and gave the king's alms-food to his wife. The guard saw what was happening, he was angry with this charade but then pitied this poor husband/wife, so he just scolded them and told them not to go to the palace again.

While the guard was walking back to the palace, he thought that since the king had so much saddha/admiration in this fake bhikkhu, he should not upset the king...instead he should say that this fake bhikkhu was an ariya-monk ..to make the king happy. So when the king asked him, he said that he followed the bhikkhu outside the town and suddenly the bhikkhu just disappeared like magic. The king was so pleased thinking that he gave his alms-food to an arahant-monk which was considered a greatest meritorious deed. Later on, the king was quite sick, knowing he would die soon..the king told this favorite guard to keep offering alms-food to the serene-bhikkhu in his name always. Then the king died and was reborn in Tusita heaven.

One day, a Pacceka-Buddha went to get alms-food in the palace, the king's guard put the royal alms-food in his alms-bowl but with suspicious mind that the Pacceka-Buddha might be a fake bhikkhu(because of the former incident). And this meritorious deed turned sour and caused the guard to go to Unhappy World after he passed away.

***********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:

:good:
You are so right Tidathep, a suspicious mind is not one to rely on, not helpful for oneself, neither for fellows. Thank you for the story, which shows own mind-heart need to be purified and not 'those we think to percieve'. :heart:
muni
 
Posts: 2736
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:59 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sun Oct 13, 2013 12:47 am

muni wrote:[quote
You are so right Tidathep, a suspicious mind is not one to rely on, not helpful for oneself, neither for fellows. Thank you for the story, which shows own mind-heart need to be purified and not 'those we think to percieve'. :heart:

-----------
Sawaddee Ka...Muni,

You probably know the story of Ambapali's past life...As a putthujjana bhikkhuni, she saw an ariya-bhikkhuni spitting ...not knowing that the Bhikkhuni was an ariya...Ambapali said to herself that "oh, this bhikkhuni spat like a prostitute". Because of her ill-thought, after she died, she was reborn as a beautiful courtesan. Thai people love this story very much.

Truly appreciate your reply and I love your 2nd video clip very much :thanks:
tidathep
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby muni » Sun Oct 13, 2013 9:34 am

tidathep wrote:
You probably know the story of Ambapali's past life...As a putthujjana bhikkhuni, she saw an ariya-bhikkhuni spitting ...not knowing that the Bhikkhuni was an ariya...Ambapali said to herself that "oh, this bhikkhuni spat like a prostitute". Because of her ill-thought, after she died, she was reborn as a beautiful courtesan. Thai people love this story very much.

Truly appreciate your reply and I love your 2nd video clip very much :thanks:
tidathep


Sawaddee Ka, Tidathep,

No I don't know it, I only can see a bit by your words. I am thinking that suspicioussness in mind can as well be the opposite of faith in the Buddhas' teachings. But then by faith in them, the suspiciousness fades. Like the story by Geshe Wangyal about a dog tooth who was given as a tooth of the Buddha to a very devoted old woman. The benefits by her devotion and faith were amazing.

:anjali:
muni
 
Posts: 2736
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:59 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sun Oct 13, 2013 4:16 pm

[quote="muni

No I don't know it, I only can see a bit by your words. I am thinking that suspicioussness in mind can as well be the opposite of faith in the Buddhas' teachings. But then by faith in them, the suspiciousness fades. Like the story by Geshe Wangyal about a dog tooth who was given as a tooth of the Buddha to a very devoted old woman. The benefits by her devotion and faith were amazing.

:anjali:[/quote]
-----
Sawaddee Ka ...Muni,

Could you please post the full story by Geshe Wangyal about a dog tooth who was given as a tooth of the Buddha to a very devoted old woman. The benefits by her devotion and faith were amazing. .....I really love to read...and all members can read it too...pretty please.

tidathep :namaste:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby muni » Sun Oct 13, 2013 8:33 pm

Sawaddee Ka Tidathep,

Yes of course. With pleasure. Here is the story how Kalu Rinpoche thaught it:

"There was an old woman in Lhasa whose son was a trader. Once a year he went to India to do business. His mother was a very devout Buddhist. She said to her son on numerous occasions, as he was setting off on his trips, 'You know, you're going to the land of India, which is the most holy country on earth as far as Buddhists are concerned, because the Lord Buddha appeared there and first presented the teachings of the Buddhadharma in that country. Do your old mother a favor and bring back some relic or some holy article or object from India that I can use as an object of worship on my shrine. I'll place it on my shrine and do prostrations to it, pray to it, make offerings to it as a way to develop my faith and merit.'

"Every time the son would say ,'Yes, mother,' but he would become so involved in his business that he would completely forget about it, because to him it was a very trivial thing. When he would return, his mother would ask, 'Well, did you bring me my relic?' And he would tell her he'd forgotten. This was repeated many times.

"As she got older, the woman became a little desperate and she finally said to her son, 'This may be the last journey you will make in my lifetime. This is your last chance to bring me a holy relic from India. If you fail this old mother of yours is going to kill herself in your presence.' Realizing that she was serious, he tried his best to remember, but again he became involved in traveling, trading, and making profits.

"On his return journey, he sat by the side of the road to brew up a cup of tea. Suddenly, he remembered his promise to his mother and in his desperation, saw the bones of a dog that had died by the side of the road. He had an inspiration and broke off one of the teeth from the jawbone of the dog, wrapped it up in a very fine silk of different colors, and carried it home.

"When his mother said, 'Did you remember?' he said, 'I remembered.' He unwrapped the gift and said, 'This is the Buddha's tooth. I brought this back from India just for you, Mother, because you wanted something very holy. It is a very, very blessed and holy object.' His mother was overjoyed. She took it and put it up on her shrine. She would spend the whole day doing prostrations to it, making offerings to it, and praying to the Buddha in the presence of what she felt was the tooth of the Buddha. The remarkable thing was that relics started to emerge from this dog's tooth. Not only did these benefit a large number of people, but the old woman was enveloped in a rainbow of light as she died and a shower of blossoms rained down from the sky as an indication that she had definitely made a significant step forward on the path to liberation".

:anjali:
muni
 
Posts: 2736
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:59 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:18 am

Sawaddee Ka..Muni,

Thank you so very much....I love love the story...please let me post your story @ my websites , Sariputtadhamma and Journey To Nibbana. And I have the story of Ambapali that I posted @Dhamma Wheel ...for you.

Ambapali : http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=12026

tidathep :namaste:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby muni » Mon Oct 14, 2013 8:46 am

Yes of course and I enjoyed the story, which is showing a beauty and power, exceeding all wordly ones. Thank you very much, Tidathep.
:anjali:
muni
 
Posts: 2736
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:59 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby shaunc » Mon Oct 14, 2013 11:53 am

Thanks for all of the stories you do for us tidathep, this is one of my favourite threads on the forum, & especially thanks for the pictures, my daughter often asks me to look at them. Any pictures with animals are good, she likes all animals & hopefully we're teaching her a little bit about Buddhism. Sometimes she comes with me to a temple where she really likes the monk & loves to put some fruit, vegetables & eggs from home on the Buddha statue. She always says that she wants to feed the Buddha.
shaunc
 
Posts: 268
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:10 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Mon Oct 14, 2013 3:35 pm

shaunc wrote:Thanks for all of the stories you do for us tidathep, this is one of my favourite threads on the forum, & especially thanks for the pictures, my daughter often asks me to look at them. Any pictures with animals are good, she likes all animals & hopefully we're teaching her a little bit about Buddhism. Sometimes she comes with me to a temple where she really likes the monk & loves to put some fruit, vegetables & eggs from home on the Buddha statue. She always says that she wants to feed the Buddha.

--------------
Sawaddee Ka..Shaunc,

Reading about your daughter, remind me of a few kids that I saw sitting nicely listening to the monks' chantings at Wat Pa Sri Thavorn, Houston...and they were trained real well to give alms-food to the monks...I was so impressed!

I love your reply and I love your daughter's attitude...she's a very nice little Buddhist :heart:
tidathep :anjali:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby Aemilius » Tue Oct 15, 2013 4:07 pm

tidathep wrote:
Aemilius wrote:
tidathep wrote:
Can You tell us a Sutta where the earth goddess Mae Thoranee is mentioned?
I believe that Mae Thoranee is in sanskrit Vasudhara, or Vasundhara?

Thanks, Aemilius

-------------------
Sawaddee Ka

I can't find Sutta where the earth goddess Mae Thoranee is mentioned..but I have beautiful pictures of Earth Goddess and Vasudhara Fall (stairway to Himalayas) for you.


tidathep :namaste:


Thanks for the beautiful pictures and for the information provided. I'm still interested in how the goddess Vasudhara exists in buddhist tradition if she isn't mentioned in the suttas? Is there an oral tradition about Vasudhara that is parallel to the suttas and sutras and that comes from the time of the Buddha? How do You see Her existence in Buddhism and the origin for it ?
svaha
User avatar
Aemilius
 
Posts: 1433
Joined: Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:44 am

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Oct 16, 2013 6:04 pm

Sawaddee Ka..Aemilius,

I don't know much about Vasudhara (the earth goddess), but when I was young..always went with my mom to temples. After people giving alms-foods/robes/medicines/money etc. the monks would chant Anumodhana..blessing and we would pour some water into a small vase, drop by drop(concludes most Buddhist ceremonies including donation celebrations and feasts. This ceremonial libation is done to share the accrued merit with all other living beings in all 31 planes of existence). Finally my mom and other people would take the vases outside the temple and pour the water on soil, to return water to the Earth Goddess(The earth goddess Vasudhara is invoked to witness these meritorious deeds.)

tidathep :namaste:
User avatar
tidathep
 
Posts: 471
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am

PreviousNext

Return to Dharma Stories

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests

>