Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

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Indrajala
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Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Indrajala » Tue Aug 06, 2013 2:32 pm

tad etat sarvajñānaṃ karuṇāmūlaṃ bodhicittahetukam upāyaparyavasānam iti |

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Konchog1
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Konchog1 » Tue Aug 06, 2013 5:25 pm

Rechungpa, Padmasambhava, Virupa, and several of the Mahasiddha are described as killing tirthikas. It's unnecessary to sift though metaphors to find such examples.
Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

-Ra Lotsawa, All-pervading Melodious Drumbeats

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Malcolm
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Malcolm » Wed Aug 07, 2013 2:47 am





འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔


Free of hope and fear, relax.
Human life spent in
a state of great spaciousness is enjoyable.


— Kunzang Dechen Lingpa

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Indrajala
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Indrajala » Wed Aug 07, 2013 2:54 am

The point though is that there is a reluctance to concede that some (or many?) Buddhists in the late period became violent and justified it through religious practices and ideas.
tad etat sarvajñānaṃ karuṇāmūlaṃ bodhicittahetukam upāyaparyavasānam iti |

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Konchog1
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Konchog1 » Wed Aug 07, 2013 3:25 am

Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

-Ra Lotsawa, All-pervading Melodious Drumbeats

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Astus
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Astus » Wed Aug 07, 2013 3:51 pm

I recall stories of Indian masters where they debated with tirthikas and it got violent. Alas, I can't find sources now to give names. But it'd show that it's not necessarily connected to Vajrayana.
(not what I wanted, but for instance in Taranatha's History of Buddhism in India (p 30) Sankaracarya kills himself after losing in debate to Dharmakirti)

From the Mahaparinirvana Sutra (Adamantine Body chapter):

"One who upholds Wonderful Dharma does not receive the five precepts and practise deportment, but protects with the sword, bow, arrow, and halberd those bhiksus who uphold the precepts and who are pure."

"The eternal body of the Tathagata is one carved in stone, as it were." The Buddha said to Kasyapa: "O good man! For that reason, bhiksus, bhiksunis, upasakas, upasikas should all the more make effort and protect Wonderful Dharma. The reward for protecting Wonderful Dharma is extremely great and innumerable. O good man! Because of this, those upasakas who protect Dharma should take the sword and staff and protect such a bhiksu who guards Dharma. Even though a person upholds the precepts, we cannot call that person one who upholds Mahayana. Even though a person has not received [in formal ceremony] the five precepts, if he protects Wonderful Dharma, such a one can well be called one of Mahayana. A person who upholds the Wonderful Dharma should take the sword and staff and guard bhiksus." Kasyapa said to the Buddha: "O World-Honoured One! If all bhiksus are to be accompanied by such upasakas with the sword and staff, can we say that they are worthy of the name, or are they unworthy of such? Or is this upholding the precepts or not?" The Buddha said to Kasyapa: "Do not say that such persons are those who transgress the precepts. O good man! After I have entered Nirvana, the world will be evil-ridden and the land devastated, each pillaging the other, and the people will be driven by hunger. At such a time, because of hunger, men may make up their minds, abandon home and enter the Sangha. Such persons are bogus priests. Such, on seeing those persons who are strict in their observance of the precepts, right in their deportment, and pure in their deeds, upholding Wonderful Dharma, will drive such away or kill them or cause harm to them." Bodhisattva Kasyapa said again to the Buddha: "O World-Honoured One! How can all such persons upholding the precepts and guarding Wonderful Dharma get into villages and castle towns and teach?" "O good man! That is why I allow those who uphold the precepts to be accompanied by the white-clad people [lay people, non-monks] with the sword and staff. Although all kings, ministers, rich lay men [grhapati] and upasakas may possess the sword and staff for protecting Dharma, I call this upholding the precepts. You may possess the sword and staff, "but do not take life". If things are thus, we call this first-hand upholding of the precepts."
Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



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kirtu
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby kirtu » Thu Aug 08, 2013 4:00 pm



"Even if you practice only for an hour a day with faith and inspiration, good qualities will steadily increase. Regular practice makes it easy to transform your mind. From seeing only relative truth, you will eventually reach a profound certainty in the meaning of absolute truth."
Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche.

"Only you can make your mind beautiful."
HH Chetsang Rinpoche

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Konchog1
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Konchog1 » Thu Aug 08, 2013 7:45 pm

Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

-Ra Lotsawa, All-pervading Melodious Drumbeats

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Konchog1
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Konchog1 » Thu Aug 08, 2013 11:48 pm

Here we are: http://www.scribd.com/doc/149443303/The ... co-Critina

In the middle of pg. 20 we find: "At that time the Buddhist communities had spread and were flourishing in Oddiyana and in thenearby country of Katstsha, where even the king was an Upasaka pundit.The king of Pagada,a city in the country of Molatana, who was a Muslim, had subdued Katstsha with his army,destroying some Buddhist schools and conquering the remaining ones. His army had arrived as far as Kekyi kab by boat and by swimming in the river Nila. From the bank of the river the Master, by using the ‘fierce gaze’ and by pointing his index finger strongly towards them sank their seven big boats and five hundred small boats made from only one piece of wood, together with all the men who were swimming. All those fearless Muslims died and afterwards no more disturbances came from that quarter for many generations."

On the bottom of the pg. 24 we find: "The minister We Dongzig also strongly hated Buddhism, so the Master said: "In a while he will be powerful and won't let the Dharma spread, therefore the time has come to eliminate him." Padmasambhava mediated for an instant; right then all the minister's blood drained out of his body, so that he died. "
Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

-Ra Lotsawa, All-pervading Melodious Drumbeats

Rakz
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Rakz » Fri Aug 09, 2013 11:20 pm


plwk
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby plwk » Sat Aug 10, 2013 8:41 am


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yan kong
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby yan kong » Sun Aug 11, 2013 3:46 am

While I do not condone violence by any party I still think there is a difference between monks taking up arms and the lay community taking up arms to defend the sangha if need be.
"Meditation is a spiritual exercise, not a therapeutic regime... Our intention is to enter Nirvana, not to make life in Samsara more tolerable." Chan Master Hsu Yun

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Konchog1
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby Konchog1 » Sat Sep 07, 2013 10:15 pm

Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

-Ra Lotsawa, All-pervading Melodious Drumbeats

DGA
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Re: Violence in late period Indian Buddhism

Postby DGA » Mon Sep 09, 2013 6:38 pm

What does the author mean by "social revolt" in the context of the passage cited in the first post?


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