Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Thu Aug 01, 2013 1:48 pm

The Naga Who Became A Bhikkhu

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

The Thai Tipitaka : there are nagas that live deep down under the earth/river, they have beautiful vimanas, they have magical jewelries around their necks, they can disguise themselves as men/women...Remember Muccalinda?? The king of nagas that protected the Buddha from rain-stormy-weather?? After the bad weather was gone, Muccalinda turned into a young man to pay homage to the Buddha.

Muccalinda and the Buddha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=va6_apifkbs

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The Naga Who Became A Bhikkhu
[Translated from a Thai story @facebook by Yawares]


Once upon a time, there was a young naga who hated to be himself(animal), he wanted so much to be a human being. Having heard about the great Buddha and his marvellous dhamma, he thought about becoming a bhikkhu. One day, with his magical power..he turned himself into a young man, went to a monastery and asked to join the Buddha's Order. After becoming a bhikkhu, he stayed with a thera who let him share a room in his kuti. One night, the thera went out walking meditation for a long time, the naga fell asleep and turned into his nature body(naga). When the thera came back to his kuti, seeing the big serpent, he was so scared, shouting loudly for help. All the bhikkhus came running to see what was happening, at that time..the naga was wide awaken, turned into a bhikkhu sitting in the room. The thera asked him why he disguised himself as a monk, he confessed that because he wanted so much to be a human being in the next life, and he thought that being a monk studying/listening to Buddha's dhamma would make his wish come true.

The thera/bhikkhus took the naga to pay homage to the Buddha. The Buddha told the naga that because he was an animal, he could never be a bhikkhu or achieving anything..he should go back to his place and observed 8 Precepts on every Uposatha Days until he died...that would be his meritorious deeds for being reborn as a human being in the next life. The naga was so sad that he could not stay as a bhikkhu, he cried and went away.

The Buddha told the bhikkhus that all nagas could disguise themselves as men/women but whenever they fell asleep or when they made love with nagas, they would turned back into their nature-forms(nagas).

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NOTE: In Thailand, we call a man who wear white robe just before his ordination as a bhikkhu..."NAGA".

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Fri Aug 02, 2013 1:17 pm

The Son Of A Butcher Who Attained Anagami Fruition

Sawaddee Ka

In Thailand, many buddhists love to offer robes/food/money etc. to monks on important Buddhas-Days on behalf of their dead/living parents/relatives. I'm so happy that I did these things on behalf of everybody in my family with Luangta Bua, Phra-Kruba Chaiyavongsa Thera Put, Thera Somchai, Thera Thavorn, monks and the Monks Hospital.

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The Son Of A Butcher Who Attained Anagami Fruition
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya Tin, M.A.]


While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses (235) to (238) of this book, with reference to the son of a butcher.

Once in Savatthi, there was a man who had been a butcher for fifty-five years. All this time, he slaughtered cattle and sold the meat and everyday he took meat curry with his rice. One day, he left some meat with his wife to cook it for the family, and then left for the riverside to have his bath. During his absence, a friend coaxed his wife to sell that particular piece of meat to him. As a result, there was no meat curry for the butcher on that day. But as the butcher never took his meal without meat curry, he hurriedly went to the back of his house, where an ox was standing. He promptly cut off the tongue of the ox and baked it over a fire. When having his meal, the butcher had a bite of the tongue of the ox, but as he did so his own tongue was cut off and fell into his plate of rice. Thus the ox and the butcher were in the same plight, both of them having had their tongues cut off. The butcher was in great pain and agony, and he went about agitatedly on his knees, with blood dripping profusely from his mouth. Then the butcher died and was reborn in the Avici Niraya.

The butcher's wife was greatly disturbed and she was anxious for her son to get away to some other place, lest this evil should befall him too. So she sent her son to Taxila. At Taxila, he acquired the art of a goldsmith. Later, he married the daughter of his master and some children were born to them. When their sons came of age he returned to Savatthi. The sons were endowed with faith in the Buddha and were religiously inclined. They were anxious about their father, who had grown old with no thought of religion or of his future existence. So one day, they invited the Buddha and the bhikkhus to their house for alms-food. After the meal they said to the Buddha, "Venerable Sir, we are making this offering to you today on behalf of our father. Kindly give a discourse specially for him." So the Buddha said, "My disciple! You are getting old; but you have not made any provisions of merit for your journey to the next existence; you should now find a support for yourself."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 235: You are now like a withered leaf; the messengers of death are near you; you are about to set out on a long journey; (yet), you have no provisions (for the journey).

Verse 236: Make a firm support for yourself; hasten to strive hard, and be wise. Having removed impurities and being free from moral defilements you shall enter the abodes of the Ariyas (i.e., Suddhavasa brahma realm).

Verse 237: Now you are of advanced age; you are going to the presence of the King of Death and you cannot stop on the way; (yet) you have no provisions (for the journey).

Verse 238: Make a firm support for yourself; hasten to strive hard, and be wise. Having removed impurities and being free from moral defilements you will no longer be subject to rebirth and decay.


At the end of the discourse the father of the donors of alms-food (i.e., the son of the butcher) attained Anagami Fruition.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Aug 03, 2013 3:46 pm

The Vipassi Buddha's Dhamma Flag

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

Texas is too hot these days...well 103 degrees Farenheit is the nice time to post this story... about the flag for the Vipassi Buddha's temple.

Image
International Buddhist flag

Image
Thai Buddhist flag
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The Vipassi Buddha's Dhamma Flag
[Translated from Thai Tipitaka by Yawares]


At the Pubbarama-vihara, King Pasenadi asked the Buddha about the result from the good deed of making a flag for the Buddha's monastery. Then the Buddha told this story:

During Vipassi Buddha's era, a very poor man/wife, who had so much saddha in Vipassi Buddha/dhamma, wanted to make a flag for the vihara. They went to find the very best piece of wood in the forest and carved it beautifully to use as a flag-pole. But they both died before the flag was finished. They were reborn into the Tavatimsa Deva World.

Later on, another man saw this unfinished flag-pole and decided to smooth/decorate it. Just before he could find a piece of cloth to make a flag, he died and was reborn into the Tavatimsa.

After that, a goldsmith with saddha, coated the flag-pole with gold. A rich merchant happened to see this golden pole, he made a beautiful flag to attach to the goldsmith's golden pole. This time the Vipassi Buddha's dhamma-symbol-flag was finished. When the goldsmith and the merchant died, they both were reborn into the Tavatimsa Deva world.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sun Aug 04, 2013 4:32 pm

Veluvana : The First Buddhist Monastery Accepted By The Buddha

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I watched Veluvana story @youtube, very beautiful video-clip(by Thai artists). Do you know that Veluvana was the first arama..not Jetavana?? The earth trembled when the water - poured over the Buddha's hand by Bimbisāra in dedication of Veluvana - fell on the earth. This was the only ārāma in Jambudīpa, the dedication of which was accompanied by a tremor of the earth!!

VELUVANA : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxojr1Rxelw

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Veluvana : The First Buddhist Monastery Accepted By The Buddha
[Dhamma Portal]


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ei6vXtKG4c

Veluvana. A park near Rājagaha, the pleasure garden of Bimbisāra. When the Buddha first visited Rājagaha, after his Enlightenment, he stayed at the Latthivanuyyāna. The day after his arrival, he accepted the king's invitation to a meal at the palace, at the end of which the king, seeking a place for the Buddha to live "not too far from the town, not too near, suitable for coming and going, easily accessible to all people, by day not too crowded, by night not exposed to noise and clamour, clean of the smell of people, hidden from men and well fitted to seclusion" decided on Veluvana, and bestowed it on the Buddha and the fraternity. This was the first ārāma accepted by the Buddha, and a rule was passed allowing monks to accept such an ārāma. the earth trembled when the water - poured over the Buddha's hand by Bimbisāra in dedication of Veluvana - fell on the earth. This was the only ārāma in Jambudīpa, the dedication of which was accompanied by a tremor of the earth.

The Buddha at once went to stay there, and it was during this stay that Sāriputta and Moggallāna joined the Order.

Kalandakanivāpa is the place nearly always mentioned as the spot where the Buddha stayed in Veluvana. There many Vinaya rules were passed - e.g., on the keeping of the vassa, the use of food cooked in the monastery, the picking of edible (kappiya) fruit in the absence of any layman from whom permission to do so could be obtained, surgical operations on monks, the eating of sugar, the rubbing of various parts of the body against wood, the use of the kinds of dwelling and the use of gold and silver.

During the Buddha's stay at Veluvana, Dabba Mallaputta, at his own request, was appointed regulator of lodgings and apportioner of rations. The Buddha was at Veluvana when Dabba also decided to die. He went there to take leave of the Buddha, and Sāriputta and Moggallāna brought back the five hundred monks whom Devadatta had enticed away to Gayāsīsa. The Buddha spent the second, third, and fourth vassas at Veluvana. It was while the Buddha was at Veluvana that Devadatta attempted to kill him by causing Nālāgiri to be let loose against him. It was a very peaceful place, and monks, who had taken part in the first Convocation, rested there, in Kalandakanivāpa, after their exertions. It was there that they met Purāna, who refused to acknowledge the authenticity of their Recital.

Numerous Jātakas were recited at Veluvana - e.g., Asampadāna, Upahāna, Ubhatobhattha, Kandagalaka, Kālabāhu, Kukkuta, Kumbhila etc. Most of these refer to Devadatta, some to Ajātasattu, and some to Ananda's attempt to sacrifice his life for the Buddha.

The books mention, in addition, various suttas which were preached there. Among those who visited the Buddha at Veluvana were several devaputtas: Dīghalattha, Nandana, Candana, Sudatta, Subrahmā, Asama, Sahali, Ninka, Akotaka, Vetambari and Mānavagāmiya; also the Dhanañjanī brahmin; the Bhāradvājas: Akkosaka, Asurinda, Bilangika, Aggika, Acela Kassapa, Susīma; the thirty monks from Pāvā. Theras, like Mahākappina Aññākondañña (just before his death); Sonagahapatiputta, Samiddhi, Moliya Sīvaka, Tālaputa, Manicūlaka, Mahācunda (during his illness), Visākha (after his visit to Dhammadīnnā, who preached to him the Culla Vedalla Sutta), Abhayarājakumāra, Gulissāni, Vacchagotta, Bhūmija, Samiddhi, Aciravata, Sabhiya, Vassaka, Suppabuddha, Pilindavaccha, Jānussoni and the princess Cundī; also Bimbisāra's wife, Khemā, who went to Veluvana because she had heard so much of its beauty. Sāriputta and Ananda visited the Buddha there on several occasions, sometimes alone, sometimes in the company of others, and Ananda lived there for some time after the Buddha's death, and during his stay there preached the Gopakamoggallāna Sutta.

Sāriputta is mentioned as having held discussions there with, among others, Candikāputta and Lāludāyī. A sermon preached by Mahā Kassapa to the monks at Veluvana. Other suttas preached by the Buddha.

It is said that Māra visited Veluvana several times in order to work his will on the Buddha. The Buddha was there when three of the monks committed suicide - Vakkali, Godhika and Channa - and he had to pronounce them free from blame. News was brought to the Buddha, at Veluvana, of the illness of three of his disciples - Assaji, Moggallāna and Dīghāvu - and he set out to visit them and comfort them with talks on the doctrine. Near Veluvana was a Paribbājaka Rāma, where the Buddha sometimes went with some of his disciples in the course of his alms rounds. Two of his discussions there are recorded in the Cūla- and Mahā Sakuladāyī Suttas.

During the Buddha's lifetime, two thūpas were erected at the gate of Veluvana, one containing the relics of Aññā Kondañña, and the other those of Moggallāna.

Veluvana was so called because it was surrounded by bamboos (velu). It was surrounded by a wall, eighteen cubits high, holding a gateway and towers.

After the Buddha's death, Dāsaka, Upāli's pupil, lived at Veluvana, and there ordained Sonaka with fifty five companions. From there Sonaka went to the Kukkutārāma.

The dedication of Veluvana was among the scenes depicted in the Relic Chamber of the Mahā Thūpa.

On one side of the main building of the Veluvana vihāra was a building called Ambalatthika. There was also a senāsana, built for the use of monks practising austerities.

It is said that, after death, Vassakāra the brahman was born as a monkey in Veluvana and answered to his name. He had been told during his lifetime that this destiny awaited him, and therefore took the precaution of seeing that the place was well supplied with fruit trees (MA.ii.854).

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Mon Aug 05, 2013 3:00 pm

The Bride And Bridegroom Who Attained Sotapatti Fruition!!

Sawaddee Ka

This story is like young love matched in heaven...Both the bride and bridegroom attained Sotapatti Fruition!! I wonder if they became husband and wife after that...I've read that a sotapanna can get married/stay married. I remember the great-upasika-Visakha was a Sotapanna, she was married and had many children..And she always looked like 16 yrs old!!

Young Love : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDI-daG7NEE

Image

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The Bride And Bridegroom Who Attained Sotapatti Fruition
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya tin, M.A.]


While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (202) of this book at the house of a lay-disciple, with reference to a young bride.

On the day a young woman was to be wedded to a young man, the parents of the bride invited the Buddha and eighty of his disciples for alms-food. Seeing the girl as she moved about the house, helping with the offering of alms-food, the bridegroom was very much excited, and he could hardly attend to the needs of the Buddha and the other bhikkhus. The Buddha knew exactly how the young bridegroom was feeling and also that time was ripe for both the bride and the bridegroom to attain Sotapatti Fruition.

By his supernormal power, the Buddha willed that the bride would not be visible to the bridegroom. When the young man could no longer see the young woman, he could pay full attention to the Buddha, and his love and respect for the Buddha grew stronger in him. Then the Buddha said to the young man, "O young man, there is no fire like the fire of passion ; there is no evil like anger and hatred; there is no ill like the burden of the five aggregates of existence (khandhas); there is no bliss like the Perfect Peace of Nibbana."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 202: There is no fire like passion; there is no evil like hatred; there is no ill like (the burden of) khandhas; there is no bliss that surpasses the Perfect Peace (i.e., Nibbana).


At the end of the discourse both the bride and bridegroom attained Sotapatti Fruition.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Aug 06, 2013 1:44 pm

Sakka Attained Sotapatti Fruition

Sawaddee Ka..today is Uposatha Day :anjali:

I love Makha the super-nice-man very much...but I love Sakka the king of devas even more!! I must say that I'm so very happy that he attained Sotapatti Fruition..but wish he attained Arahatship instead.

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The Buddha and devas by Cambodian artist..មង្គលសូត្រ ឬមង្គល

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:heart: Sakka Attained Sotapatti Fruition :heart:
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya tin, M.A.]


While residing at the village of Veluva, the Buddha uttered Verses (206), (207) and (208) of this book, with reference to Sakka, king of the devas.

About ten months before the Buddha realized parinibbana, the Buddha was spending the vassa at Veluva village near Vesali. While he was staying there, he suffered from dysentery. When Sakka learned that the Buddha was ailing, he came to Veluva village so that he could personally nurse the Buddha during his sickness. The Buddha told him not to worry about his health as there were many bhikkhus near him; but Sakka did not listen to him and kept on nursing the Buddha until he recovered.

The bhikkhus were surprised and awe-struck to find Sakka himself attending on the Buddha. When the Buddha heard their remarks he said, "Bhikkhus! There is nothing surprising about Sakka's love and devotion to me. Once, when the former Sakka was growing old and was about to pass away, he came to see me. Then, I expounded the Dhamma to him. While listening to the Dhamma, he attained Sotapatti Fruition; then he passed away and was reborn as the present Sakka. All these happened to him simply because he listened to the Dhamma expounded by me. Indeed, bhikkhus, it is good to see the Noble Ones (ariyas); it is a pleasure to live with them; to live with fools is, indeed, painful."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 206: It is good to see the Noble Ones (ariyas); to live with them is always a pleasure; not seeing fools is also always a pleasure.

Verse 207: He who walks in the company of fools has to grieve for a long time. Association with fools is ever painful, as living with an enemy; association with the wise is a pleasure, as living with relatives.

Verse 208: Therefore one should follow a resolute, intelligent, learned, persevering and dutiful ariya; follow such a virtuous and wise man, as the moon follows the path of the stars.


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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Aug 07, 2013 1:28 pm

Khemaka, The Handsome Heart-Breaker
Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

When I read this amazing story, I think how lucky Khemaka was to have a chance to listen to the Buddha's preaching and attained Sotapatti Fruition!!

Image

Khemaka, The Handsome Heart-Breaker
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya Tin,M.A.]


While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses (309) and (310) of this book, with reference to Khemaka, the son of a rich man. Khemaka was also the nephew of the renowned Anathapindika.

Khemaka, in addition to being rich, was also very good-looking and women were very much attracted to him. They could hardly resist him and naturally fell a prey to him. Khemaka committed adultery without compunction. The king's men caught him three times for sexual misconduct and brought him to the presence of the king. But King Pasenadi of Kosala did not take action because Khemaka was the nephew of Anathapindika. So Anathapindika himself took his nephew to the Buddha. The Buddha talked to Khemaka about the depravity of sexual misconduct and the seriousness of the consequences.

Verse 309. Four misfortunes befall a man who is unmindful of right conduct and commit sexual misconduct with another man's wife: acquisition of demerit, disturbed sleep, reproach, and suffering in niraya.

Verse 310. Thus, there is the acquisition of demerit, and there is rebirth in the evil apaya realms. The enjoyment of a scared man with a scared woman is short-lived, and the king also metes out severe punishment. Therefore, a man should not commit misconduct with another man's wife.

At the end of the discourse Khemaka attained Sotapatti Fruition.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Thu Aug 08, 2013 1:21 pm

The Savvy Goldsmith Reborn Into The Tavatimsa Deva World

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I love this story..I think the goldsmith was very smart to wish what he wished...because all Buddhas said that happiness and best health are the greatest gifts anyone can have.

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The Savvy Goldsmith Reborn Into The Tavatimsa Deva World
[Translated from Thai Tipitaka by Yawares Sastri]


Once upon a time, While the Buddha, Thera Sariputta and Moggallana stayed at Jetavanaaram in Savatthi.

A handsome goldsmith who was a self-made-millionaire...One day, after listening to the Buddha's preaching, he thought about his wealth..how to keep..how to spend his wealth wisely...what if he died, he couldn't take his wealth/treasure with him. So he thought about the Buddha, he would like to spend his wealth with Buddha-Sassana which was the only way that he could take ultimate merits with him while living and after his death. He realized that since the kings and other millionaires built viharas, kutis, salas and other things..But there were no restrooms, bathrooms, fireplaces yet...So the wise goldsmith spent his millions to build restrooms/bathrooms/fireplaces for the Buddha and the Sangha followed by big ceremony. The goldsmith prayed that with his meritorious deeds..he wished that as long as he didn't achieve his ultimate goal 'Nibbana', may the Buddha blessed him with happiness and best health, no sickness to make him suffer all through his very long journey in samsara. And Thera Sariputta gave him the blessing that all his wishes would come true, also told him to observe 5/8 Precepts all his life.

When the goldsmith died, he was reborn into the Tavatimsa Deva World.

One day, the bhikkhus talked about the goldsmith's death. The Buddha preached that it was a true blessing to live and meet the Buddha, having chances to listen to the dhammas. This wise goldsmith had done great meritorious deeds with true saddha/devotion which would bless him with 'Nibbana' in the end of his samsara. Then the Buddha told the tale.....

During the time of Tanhankara Buddha, he himself was born as a Bodhisatta who built bathrooms/restrooms/fireplaces for Tanhakara Buddha and the Sangha. And he made a wish to be a future Buddha. After his death, he was reborn into the Tusita Deva World. And after long journey in the samsara, accumulating his paramis to the fullest, now he became the Buddha himself just like what he made his wish to the Tanhankara Buddha.

At the end of of the preaching, many bhikkhus attained Sotapatti Fruition.

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NOTE: Thera Mun told his disciples that he and his mentor(Thera Sao Kantasilo) gave up the wish to be a Buddha after they realized that life was full of misery and they wanted to attain arahatship as fast as possible in their present life.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Fri Aug 09, 2013 1:45 pm

Bimbisára : King of Magadha And The Greatest Patron Of The Buddha

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I really like King Bimbisara, he was super nice and kind..especially to Dr.Jivaka(my most favorite Sotapanna). So today, I proudly present the great story of King Bimbisara who so loved the Buddha..(Bimbisara = "of a golden colour," bimbí meaning gold . But another reason was that he was radiant like the morning sun.)

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Bimbisára : King of Magadha And The Greatest Patron Of The Buddha
[Dhamma Portal]


He ascended the throne at the age of fifteen and reigned in Rájagaha for fifty two years. The Buddha was five years older than Bimbisára, and it was not until fifteen years after his accession that Bimbisára heard the Buddha preach and was converted by him. It is said that the two were friends in their youth owing to the friendship which existed between their fathers. Bimbisára's father was called Bháti; according to Tibetan sources, he was called Mahápaduma and his Mother Bimbí.

But according to the Pabbajá Sutta, the first meeting between the Buddha and Bimbisára took place in Rájagaha under the Pandavapabbata, only after the Buddha's Renunciation. The king, seeing the young ascetic pass below the palace windows, sent messengers after him. On learning, that he was resting after his meal, Bimbisára followed him and offered him a place in his court. This the Buddha refused, revealing his identity. Then King Bimbisára wished him success in his quest and asked him to visit first Rájagaha as soon as he had attained Enlightenment. It was in fulfilment of this promise that the Buddha visited Rájagaha immediately after his conversion of the Tebhátika Jatilá. He stayed at the Supatittha cetiya in Latthivanuyyána, whither Bimbisára, accompanied by twelve nahutas of householders, went to pay to him his respects. The Buddha preached to them, and eleven nahutas, with Bimbisára at their head, became sotápannas. On the following day the Buddha and his large retinue of monks accepted the hospitality of Bimbisára. Sakka, in the guise of a young man, preceded them to the palace, singing songs of glory of the Buddha. At the conclusion of the meal, Bimbisára poured water from a golden jar on the Buddha's hand and dedicated Veluvana for the use of him and of his monks.

It was this gift of Veluvana, which formed the model for Devánampiyatissa's gift of the Mahámeghavana to Mahinda. The gift of Veluvana was one of the incidents sculptured in the Relic chamber of the Mahá Thúpa. It may have been in Veluvana that the king built for the monks a storeyed house, fully plastered. With the attainment of sopátatti, the king declared that all the five ambitions of his life had been fulfilled:

-That he might become king
-That the Buddha might visit his realm
-That he might wait on the Buddha
-That the Buddha might teach him the doctrine
-That he might understand it.

According to BuA. (p. 18f.) the king became a Sotápanna after listening to the Mahá-Nárada Játaka.

From this moment up till the time of his death, a period of thirty seven years, Bimbisára did all in his power to help on the new religion and to further its growth. He set an example to his subjects in the practice of the precepts by taking the uposatha vows on six days, of each month.

Bimbisára's chief queen was Kosaladeví, daughter of Mahákosala and sister of Pasenadi. On the day of her marriage she received, as part of her dowry, a village in Kási, for her bath money. Her son was Ajátasattu. Bimbisára had other wives as well; Khemá, who, at first, would not even visit the Buddha till enticed by Bimbisára's descriptions of the beauties of Veluvana; and the courtesan Padumavatí, who was brought from Ujjení, with the help of a Yakkha, so that Rájagaha might not lack a Nagarasobhiní. Both these later became nuns. Padumavatí's son was Abhaya. Bimbisára had another son by Ambapálí, known as Vimala Kondañña, and two others, by different wives, known as Sílava and Jayasena. A daughter, Cundi, is also mentioned.

*****to be continued***********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Aug 10, 2013 12:56 pm

Bimbisára : King of Magadha And The Greatest Patron Of The Buddha....(Continue)

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

In Thailand..wise men say :

Befriend with a fool..fool will take you to Niraya
Befriend with a sage..sage will lead you to heaven

Prince Ajatasattu associated with Devadatta who did lead him to Niraya for very very long time!

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Bimbisára : King of Magadha And The Greatest Patron Of The Buddha
[Dhamma Portal]


Bimbisára's death, according to the Commentaries, was a sad one. Soothsayers had predicted, before the birth of Ajátasattu, that he would bring about the death of his father, for which reason his mother had wished to bring about an abortion. But Bimbisára would not hear of this, and when the boy was born, treated him with the greatest affection. When the prince came of age, Devadatta, by an exhibition of his iddhi-power, won him over to his side and persuaded him to encompass the death of his father, Bimbisára's patronage of the Buddha being the greatest obstacle in the path of Devadatta. The plot was discovered, and Bimbisára's ministers advised him to kill Ajátasattu, Devadatta and their associates. But Bimbisára sent for Ajátasattu and, on hearing that he desired power, abdicated in his favour. Devadatta chided Ajátasattu for a fool. "You are like a man who puts a skin over a drum in which is a rat," and he urged on Ajátasattu the need for the destruction of Bimbisára.

But no weapon could injure Bimbisára (probably because he was a Sotápanna, it was therefore decided that he should be starved to death, and with this end in view he was imprisoned in a hot house (tápanageha) with orders that none but the mother of Ajátasattu should visit him. On her visits she took with her a golden vessel filled with food which she concealed in her clothes. When this was discovered she took food in her head dress (molí), and, later, she was obliged to take what food she could conceal in her footgear. But all these ways were discovered, and then the queen visited Bimbisára after having bathed in scented water and smeared her body with catumadhura (the four kinds of sweets). The king licked her body and that was his only sustenance. In the end the visits of the queen were forbidden; but the king continued to live by walking about his cell meditating. Ajátasattu, hearing of this, sent barbers to cut open his feet, fill the wounds with salt and vinegar, and burn them with coals. It is said that when the barbers appeared Bimbisára thought his son had relented and had sent them to shave him and cut his hair. But on learning their real purpose, he showed not the least resentment and let them do their work, much against their will. (In a previous birth he had walked about in the courtyard of a cetiya with shoes on, hence this punishment!) Soon after, Bimbisára died, and was reborn in the Cátummahárájika world as a Yakkha named Janavasabbha, in the retinue of Vessavana. The Janavasabha Sutta records an account of a visit paid by Janavasabha to the Buddha some time after.
A son was born to Ajátasattu on the day of Bimbisára's death. The joy be experienced at the birth of his son made him realize something of the affection his own father must have felt for him, and he questioned his mother. She told him stories of his childhood, and he repented, rather belatedly, of his folly and cruelty. Soon after, his mother died of grief, and her death gave rise to the protracted war between Ajátasattu and Pasenadi.

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NOTE: King Ajatasattu was the father of Prince Ajita who joined the Buddha's Order( I posted the story of Prince Ajita @ Dhamma Wheel) . The Buddha predicted that Ajita would become the next Metteya Buddha in the future. According to Thai Tipitaka, The Metteya Buddha era will be perfect, beautiful people, beautiful world...people will live in harmony..because the Metteya Buddha perfects his ultimate "Loving-Kindness Paramis".

******************to be continued***********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:42 pm

Bimbisára : King of Magadha And The Greatest Patron Of The Buddha....(Continue)

Sawaddee Ka

This part of the story mentioned "the Buddha intended to perform a miracle"(Yamaka Miracle)...I'll post it real soon with beautiful video-clip(youtube).

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Bimbisára : King of Magadha And The Greatest Patron Of The Buddha
[Dhamma Portal]


The books contain no mention of any special sermons preached by the Buddha to Bimbisára nor of any questions asked by him of the Buddha.

When he heard that the Buddha intended to perform a miracle, although he had ordered his disciples to refrain from doing so, Bimbisára had doubts about the propriety of this and questioned the Buddha who set his doubts at rest. It was also at the request of Bimbisára that the Buddha established the custom of the monks assembling on the first, eighth, fourteenth and fifteenth days of each month.

It is said that he once visited four monks - Godhika, Subáhu, Valliya and Uttiya - and invited them to spend the rainy season at Rájagaha. He built for them four huts, but forgot to have them roofed, with the result that the gods withheld the rains until the king remembered the omission. He similarly forgot his promise to give Pilindavaccha a park keeper, if the Buddha would sanction such a gift. Five hundred days later he remembered his promise and to make amends, gave five hundred park keepers with a special village for their residence, called Árámikagáma or Pilindagáma.

Bimbisára's affection for the Buddha was unbounded. When the Licchavis sent Maháli, who was a member of Bimbisára's retinue, to beg the Buddha to visit Vesáli. When the Buddha agreed to go he repaired the whole road from Rájagaha to the Ganges - a distance of five leagues - for the Buddha to walk upon; he erected a rest house at the end of each league, and spread flowers of five different colours knee deep along the whole way. Two parasols were provided for the Buddha and one for each monk. The king himself accompanied the Buddha in order to look after him, offering him flowers and perfume and all requisites throughout the journey, which lasted five days. Arrived at the river, he fastened two boats together decked with flowers and jewels and followed the Buddha's boat into the water up to his neck. When the Buddha had gone, the king set up an encampment on the river bank, awaiting his return; he then escorted him back to Rájagaha with similar pomp and ceremony.

Great cordiality existed between Bimbisára and Pasenadi. They were connected by marriage, each having married a sister of the other. Pasenadi once visited Bimbisára in order to obtain from him a person of unbounded wealth (amitabhoga) for his kingdom. Bimbisára had five such - Jotiya, Jatila, Mendaka, Punnaka and Kákavaliya; but Pasenadi had none. The request was granted, and Mendaka's son, Dhanañjaya, was sent back to Kosala with Pasenadi. Some of these were richer than Bimbisára - e.g., Jotiya, whose house was built entirely of jewels while the king's palace was of wood; but the king showed no jealousy.

Bimbisára also maintained friendly relations with other kings, such as Pukkasáti, king of Takkasilá, Candappajjota, king of Ujjení, to whom he sent his own physician Jívaka to tend in his illness - and Rudráyana of Roruka.

NOTE: I posted the story of Jotiya @Dhamma Wheel...wonderful story indeed!

******************to be continued***********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Mon Aug 12, 2013 1:09 pm

Bimbisára : King of Magadha And The Greatest Patron Of The Buddha..continue
Sawaddee Ka

As you all know now that King Bimbisara attained Sotapatti Fruition at the end of the Buddha's preaching which included the MahaNarada Kassapa Jataka {the past life of the Bodhisatta(Narada) and Uruvela-Kassapa (King Angati)}. This Jataka is quite long but so amazing, it describes many levels of hells, all kinds of torturings/sufferings. No wonder so many people became sotapannas at the end of the sermon.

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Bimbisára : King of Magadha And The Greatest Patron Of The Buddha
[Dhamma Portal]


Among the ministers and personal retinue of Bimbisára are mentioned Sona-Kolvisa, the flower gatherer Sumana who supplied the king with eight measures of jasmine flowers, the minister Koliya, the treasurer Kumbbaghosaka and his physician Jívaka. The last named was discovered for him by the prince Abhaya when he was suffering from a fistula. The king's garments were stained with blood,Jívaka cured the king with one single anointing; the king offered him the ornaments of the five hundred women of the palace, and when he refused to take these, he was appointed physician to the king, the women of the seraglio and the fraternity of monks under the Buddha.

When Dhammadinná wished to join the Buddha's Order, Bimbisára gave her, at her husband's request, a golden palanquin and allowed her to go round the city in procession.

Bimbisára is generally referred to as Seniya Bimbisára (Seniya=possessed of a large following) and Bimbisára as meaning "of a golden colour," bimbí meaning gold . But another reason was that he was radiant like the morning sun.

In the time of Phussa Buddha, when the Buddha's three step brothers, sons of King Jayasena, obtained their father's leave to entertain the Buddha for three months, Bimbisára, then head of a certain district, looked after all the arrangements. His associates in this task were born as petas, and he gave alms to the Buddha in their name in order to relieve their sufferings.

The kahápana in use in Rájagaha during Bimbisára's time was the standard of money adopted by the Buddha in the formation of those rules into which the matter of money entered.

Bimbisára had a white banner and one of his epithets was Pandaraketu. Nothing is said about his future destiny, but he is represented in the Janavasabha Sutta as expressing the wish to become a Sakadágámí, and this wish may have been fulfilled.

NOTE: Latthimadhukavana

A grove to the south west of Rajagaha. In it was the Supatittha cetiya, where the Buddha stayed during his first visit to Rajagaha from Gayasisa, after the Enlightenment. There Bimbisara visited him with twelve nahutas of followers, and Uruvela Kassapa dispelled their doubts by declaring his acceptance of the Buddha as his teacher. It was during this visit that Bimbisara gifted Veluvana to the Buddha and his Order . Eleven nahutas, with Bimbisara at their head, became sotapannas at the end of the Buddhas sermon, which included the Mahanarada Kassapa Jataka. The remaining nahuta was established in the Refuges.

The grove evidently received its name from its green liquorice creepers, hence its description as Latthimadhukavana . Hiouen Thsang calls it Yastivana and describes it as a grove of bamboos, giving accounts of its origin and various stories connected with it.

***************THE END******************
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Aug 13, 2013 1:46 pm

The Lady Who Denied Heavens

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I read this story @facebook...and I think I should share with all my dhamma-friends..someone out there may have the same opinion as this wise lady. I'm not stupid, and I'll love..love..love to be in Tusita Heaven where I can see and listen to the Bodhisatta's(future Metteya Buddha) preachings everytime.

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The Lady Who Denied Heavens
[Translated from Thai story@ facebook by Yawares]


Once there was a lady who loved to visit temples/stupas to do various meritorious deeds: donating money for building vihara/salas/kutis, giving robes/foods etc. to the sangha. One day, a deva appeared in her nimitta, telling her about the beautiful vimana and all celestial things/devas/devis were waiting for her, when she died she would be in heaven and enjoyed all these celestial possessions.

But this lady told the deva that she didn't want to be in heaven because the Buddha preached that all level of heavens are impermanent. And she was afraid that if she was reborn in heaven, when her heaven-time came to an end, she might die and come back to earth during the "Armageddon time" which would be so much sufferings. She told the deva that whenever she did meritorious deeds, she did them in order to lessen her greed. She didn't think about 'bhava-tanha' or 'vibhava-tanha', she just thought about:
-To do good
-Not to do evil
-To purify the mind

She also said that she learned from the Buddha's dhamma about practicing "loving-kindness" to root out "dosa" in order to achieve "vijja 4 " and abandon fetters/bandhas. People who practiced Loving-Kindness, Iddhipaada 4, abandoned NIVARAS/SANYOJANAS would attain Sotapatta/Sakitagami/Anagami Fruition...If they would reborn into Sudhavasa-Brahma-World, they would never come back to the SAMSARA ever again.

The lady also told the deva that her ultimate goal was "NIBBANA"...Then she said the verse:

"One who doesn't know 'dukha',
will not want to abandon 'dukha'.
One who doesn't appreciate 'nibbana',
will never know 'paramatta dhamma'.
One who does't love 'dhamma',
will never develop 'viriya'.

NOTE: The story ended without the deva's response!!

***************
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Aug 14, 2013 1:08 pm

Yamaka pātihāriya At The Mango Tree

Sawaddee Ka ..... :anjali: Today is Uposatha Day :anjali:

I found an amazing video-clip about the Buddha performing "Twin Miracle"(by Thai artist)@youtube...Please let me share it with you all.

พุทธประวัติ 31 ยมกปาฏิหาริย์ : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tlK6rNscs30

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Yamaka pātihāriya
[Palikanon.com]


The miracle of the "double appearances”. When the Buddha laid down a rule forbidding the exercise of supernatural powers by monks - following on the miracle performed by Pindola Bhāradvāja - the heretics went about saying that henceforth they would perform no miracles except with the Buddha. Bimbisāra reported this to the Buddha, who at once accepted the challenge, explaining that the rule was for his disciples and did not apply to himself. He, therefore, went to Sāvatthi, the place where all Buddhas perform the Miracle. In reply to Pasenadi, the Buddha said he would perform the miracle at the foot of the Gandamba(mango)tree on the full moon day of Asālha [in July]. This was in the seventh year after the Enlightenment.

The heretics therefore uprooted all mango trees for one league around, but, on the promised day, the Buddha went to the king's garden, accepted the mango offered by Ganda, and caused a marvellous tree to sprout from its seed. The people, discovering what the heretics had done, attacked them, and they had to flee helter-skelter. It was during this flight that Pūrana Kassapa committed suicide. The multitude, assembled to witness the miracle, extended to a distance of thirty six leagues. The Buddha created a jewelled walk in the air by the side of the Gandamba. When the Buddha's disciples knew what was in his mind, several of them offered to perform miracles and so refute the insinuations of the heretics. Among such disciples were Gharanī, Culla Anātthapindika, Cīrā, Cunda, Uppalavannā and Moggallāna.

The Buddha refused their offers and related the Kanhausabha and Nandivisāla Jātakas. Then, standing on the jewelled walk, he proceeded to perform the Yamaka-pātihāriya (Twin Miracle), so called because it consisted in the appearance of phenomena of opposite character in pairs - e.g., producing flames from the upper part of the body and a stream of water from the lower, and then alternatively. Flames of fire and streams of water also proceeded alternatively from the right side of his body and from the left. DA.l.57; . explains how this was done. From every pore of his body rays of six colours darted forth, upwards to the realm of Brahmā and downwards to the edge of the Cakkavāla. The Miracle lasted for a long while, and as the Buddha walked up and down the jewelled terrace he preached to the multitude from time to time. It is said that he performed miracles and preached sermons during sixteen days, according to the various dispositions of those present in the assembly. At the conclusion of the Miracle, the Buddha, following the example of his predecessors, made his way, in three strides, to Tāvatimsa, there to preach the Abhidhamma Pitaka to his mother, now born as a devaputta.

It is said (Mil.349) that two hundred millions of beings penetrated to an understanding of the Dhamma at the conclusion of the Miracle.

The Twin Miracle can only be performed by the Buddha. Mil.106.

*************
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Thu Aug 15, 2013 1:52 pm

Aparajita And The Vipassi Buddha's Gandhakuti

Sawaddee Ka

I read this story from Thai Tipitaka, I love it so much and I would like to dedicate this story to my family, my kalayanamittas, my dhamma-friends and all my online friends. May you all be very wealthy and attain at least Sotapatti Fruition in the future-life.

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Aparajita And The Vipassi Buddha's Gandhakuti
[Translated from Thai Tipitaka by Yawares]


Once....when the Buddha stayed at Veluvanarama, the bhikkhus talked about Jotika the billionaire who lived in the beautiful mansion made with all kind of jewels while King Bimbisara's palace made of wood. And they asked the Buddha about Jotika's past lives.

Once upon a time, two brothers in Baranasi owned a big sugar-canes field. One day, the younger brother went to survey the field, cut the sugar-canes to make juice and put into 2 containers, 1 for himself and 1 for his big brother. On the way home, he saw a PaccekaBuddha, so he made a seat for the PaccekaBuddha to sit and gave him his sugar-cane juice. Seeing the PaccekaBuddha drinking his sugar-cane juice, the young man gave him the other container of juice (that he meant for his big brother). The PaccekaBuddha told him that he would give the juice to the other 500 PaccekaBuddhas who lived near the Gandhamas Mountain. The young man was so happy, he made a wish that wherever he was reborn in heaven or on earth..may he be very rich and attain arahatship someday. And the PaccekaBuddha granted him his wish.

When the young man went home, he told his big brother about giving the sugar-cane-juice container (which he meant for him) to the PaccekaBuddha and his 500 friends. The big brother was so thrilled to share the meritorious deeds (to PaccekaBuddhas) with his brother and made a wish that he would attain arahatship someday.

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The two brothers were reborn in heaven for a very long time. In the time of Vipassi Buddha, the two brothers were reborn into a very wealthy family in Pandhumavadi, the big brother named Sena, the little brother named Aparajita. Years later, when the parents passed away, the two brothers inherited all the wealth/treasures.

One fine day, Sena heard the news that the Vipassi Buddha came to town and people were so excited to go to listen to Vipassi Buddha's preaching. He went to pay homage to the Buddha, after the sermon, he told the Buddha that he wanted to join the Order. Sena went home telling his brother that he wanted to give him all his wealth and he would become a bhikkhu living near the Buddha.

After the ordination, Aparajita always went to visit Bhikkhu Sena and listen to the Vipassi Buddha's sermons. One day he learned that his big brother attained Arahatship, he was so happy he offered the superb alms-food to the Sangha with the Buddha as the center for 7 days. Then he asked Thera Sena to tell him how he could do the finest thing for the Buddha, the big brother said that Aparajita should build a Gandhakuti for the Buddha.

Aparajita built the most beautiful Gandhakuti for the Vipassi Buddha. This Gandhakuti was made with the best woods and plaster-cement, decorated with gold and 7 colors gems at the columns, the roof and the windows. When the Gandhakuti was finished, it looked just like the shape of colorful peacock with beautiful fan-tail.

Even his nephew begged to have a part in this building, Aparajita denied him. But his nephew got to build a pavillion(elephant shape) decorated with 4 colors-gems in front of the Gandhakuti(in the Gautama Buddha Era, the nephew was reborn as Mendhaka-Setthi). After that, Aparajita built 3 clear perfumed-water ponds near the Gandhakuti, surrounded the ponds with all shrubs and trees with fragrant flowers. Finally he decorated the ground around the Gandhakuti with all kinds of small gemstones.

When the Gandhakuti was perfectly finished, Aparajita asked his Arahant-brother to invite the Vipassi Buddha to use the Gandhakuti as his place to dwell. But when the Buddha saw the gemstones on the ground around the Gandhakuti, he thought about people who would come to the place, would steal these gems and Aparajita might be angry. But Aparajita promised that he would hire guards to guard these gemstones. Then the Vipassi Buddha agreed to accept the Gandhakuti.

One day, Aparajita went to pay homage to the Buddha and placed a pretty gemstone as big as a melon by the Buddha's feet. A greedy brahmin pretended to visit the Buddha and stole the big gem then went away. Aparajita was upset by this brahmin's greed. So he made a wish to the Vipassi Buddha that never again that anyone could take his precious belongings away from him without his permission, no fire or wind or any natural-diaster could destroy his wealth/treasures, and the Buddha granted him his wish.

Later, Aparajita gave big ceremony to celebrate the Gandhakuti and offered alms-food, robes and all necessities to the Vipassi Buddha and the Sangha for 4 months continuously.

***In the Gautama Buddha Era, Aparajita was reborn as Jotika-Setthi. And King Ajatasattu could not take over Jotika's beautiful 7 stories-bling-bling-mansion...even unable to take diamond rings from Jotika's fingers!!

When King Bimbisara visited Jotika's mansion, beautifully dressed-female-servants came to greet him, King Bimbisara thought that they were Jotika's wives!!

Finally Jotika joined the Buddha's Order and later attained Arahatship. I posted the story of Jotika@ Dhamma Wheel.

********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Fri Aug 16, 2013 1:39 pm

Mara And the Five Hundred Pretty Maidens

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

This story makes me wish to be reborn into the Abhassara Brahma-Heaven, they live on PITI and SUKHA of jhana...No celestial-food..How wonderful!!..I remember the most beautiful MISS THAILAND(later became MISS UNIVERSE), Abhassara Hongsakul.

Image
Image Image

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Mara And the Five Hundred Pretty Maidens
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya tin, M.A.]


The Buddha uttered Verse (200) of this book in a brahmin village known as Pancasala (village of five halls), with reference to Mara.

On one occasion, the Buddha saw in his vision that five hundred maidens from Pancasala village were due to attain Sotapatti Fruition. So he went to stay near that village. The five hundred maidens went to the riverside to have a bath; after the bath they returned to the village fully dressed up, because it was a festival day. About the same time, the Buddha entered Pancasila village for alms-food but none of the villagers offered him anything because they had been possessed by Mara.

On his return the Buddha met Mara, who promptly asked him whether he had received much alms-food.

The Buddha saw the hand of Mara in his failure to get any alms-food on that day and replied, "You wicked Mara! It was you who turned the villagers against me. Because they were possessed by you they did not offer any alms-food to me. Am I not right ?" Mara made no reply to that question, but he thought that it would be fun to entice the Buddha back to the village and get the villagers to insult the Buddha by making fun of him. So he suggested, "O Buddha, why don't you go back to the village again? This time, you are sure to get some food."

Just then, the five hundred village maidens arrived on the scene and paid obeisance to the Buddha. In their presence, Mara taunted the Buddha, "O Buddha, since you received no alms-food this morning, you must be feeling the pangs of hunger!" To him the Buddha replied, "O wicked Mara, even though we do not get any food, like the Abhassara brahmas who live only on the delightful satisfaction (piti) and bliss (sukha) of jhana, we shall live on the delightful satisfaction and bliss of the Dhamma."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 200: Indeed we live very happily, without any anxiety (i.e., without greed, ill will and ignorance); like the Abhassara brahmas we shall live on delightful satisfaction (piti) as our food.


At the end of the discourse, the five hundred maidens attained Sotapatti Fruition.

***********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Thu Aug 22, 2013 1:20 pm

Avariyapita Jataka : The Cruel Ferryman

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

This story was told by the Buddha, regarding a foolish/cruel ferryman of Aciravati. When a certain monk came to him one evening to be taken across the river, the ferryman was annoyed and steered so badly that he wet the monks robes and delayed him from going to pay homage to the Buddha on time.

อาวาริยชาดก ค่าจ้างเรือ : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wO406txq9po

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Avariyapita Jataka : The Cruel Ferryman
[Wisdom Library]


Once, when the Bodhisatta was an ascetic, at the invitation of the King of Benares, he dwelt in the royal garden, admonishing the king on the virtues of righteousness and compassion. Being pleased with him, the king wished to present him with a village of which the revenue was a thousand, but the ascetic declined the gift. For twelve years the ascetic lived in the park; then, desiring a change, he went away, and in the course of his wanderings, arrived at a ferry on the Ganges, where lived a foolish ferryman named Avariyapita. He took the Bodhisatta across, on the latters promising to tell him how to increase his wealth, his welfare and his virtue. On reaching the other side, the Bodhisatta advised the ferryman on the desirability of getting his fare before crossing if he wished to increase his wealth; he then proceeded to recite to him the stanzas on the virtue of compassion, which, for twelve years, he had daily recited to the king. Incensed at feeling that he had been cheated out of his money, the ferryman started striking the ascetic; his wife, coming along with his food, tried to stop him. Thereupon he struck her, upsetting the food and causing her womb to miscarry. He was brought before the king and punished.

****Good advice is wasted on fools, like fine gold on beasts.

When the Master had ended his lesson, he declared the Truths:–after the Truths the brother was established in the fruit of the first path: and identified the Birth: “At that time the ferryman was the ferryman of to-day, the king was Ananda, the ascetic was myself.”

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Aug 28, 2013 12:56 pm

Rohitassa : The Powerful sky-Walker

Sawaddee Ka.......TODAY IS UPOSATHA DAY :anjali:

I Love this Rohitassa-Deva story so much, I tried to write this poem:

Rohitassa,
it's impossible
by traveling to know
or see or reach the end of the world
where there's no birth, age, die and reborn.

But there is
no end of suffering, depressing,
without reaching the end of the world.
It is within the body with perception and mind
that you'll know the world...the beginning of the world,
the end of the world..the path leading to the end of the world.

***************
Rohitassa : The Powerful sky-Walker
[translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu]


On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Then Rohitassa, the son of a deva, in the far extreme of the night, his extreme radiance lighting up the entirety of Jeta's Grove, went to the Blessed One. On arrival, having bowed down to the Blessed One, he stood to one side. As he was standing there he said to the Blessed One: "Is it possible, lord, by traveling, to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away or reappear?"

"I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear."

"It is amazing, lord, and awesome, how well that has been said by the Blessed One: 'I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear.' Once I was a seer named Rohitassa, a student of Bhoja, a powerful sky-walker. My speed was as fast as that of a strong archer — well-trained, a practiced hand, a practiced sharp-shooter — shooting a light arrow across the shadow of a palm tree. My stride stretched as far as the east sea is from the west. To me, endowed with such speed, such a stride, there came the desire: 'I will go traveling to the end of the cosmos.' I — with a one-hundred year life, a one-hundred year span — spent one hundred years traveling — apart from the time spent on eating, drinking, chewing & tasting, urinating & defecating, and sleeping to fight off weariness — but without reaching the end of the cosmos I died along the way. So it is amazing, lord, and awesome, how well that has been said by the Blessed One: 'I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear.'"

[When this was said, the Blessed One responded:] "I tell you, friend, that it is not possible by traveling to know or see or reach a far end of the cosmos where one does not take birth, age, die, pass away, or reappear. But at the same time, I tell you that there is no making an end of suffering & stress without reaching the end of the cosmos. Yet it is just within this fathom-long body, with its perception & intellect, that I declare that there is the cosmos, the origination of the cosmos, the cessation of the cosmos, and the path of practice leading to the cessation of the cosmos."
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Sep 03, 2013 2:51 pm

Sawaddee Ka :anjali:

I love this story.. Ariya monk truly impressed me..I also love King of the parrots jataka.

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Thera Nigamavasitissa/King Of The Parrots Jataka
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya Tin,M.A.]


While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (32) of this book, with reference to Thera Nigamavasitissa.

Nigamavasitissa was born and brought up in a small market town near Savatthi. After becoming a bhikkhu he lived a very simple life, with very few wants. For alms-food, he used to go to the village where his relatives were staying and took whatever was offered to him. He kept away from big occasions. Even when Anathapindika and King Pasenadi of Kosala made offerings on a grand scale, the thera did not go.

Some bhikkhus then started talking about the thera that he kept close to his relatives and that he did not care to go even when people like Anathapindika and King Pasenadi were making offerings on a grand scale, etc. When the Buddha was told about this, he sent for the thera and asked him. The thera respectfully explained to the Buddha that it was true he frequently went to his village, but it was only to get alms-food, that when he had received enough food, he did not go any further, and that he never cared whether the food was delicious or not. Whereupon, instead of blaming him, the Buddha praised him for his conduct in the presence of the other bhikkhus. He also told them that to live contentedly with only a few wants is in conformity with the practice of the Buddha and the Noble Ones (Ariyas), and that all bhikkhus should, indeed, be like Thera Tissa from the small market town. In this connection, he further related the story of the king of the parrots.

Once upon a time, the king of the parrots lived in a grove of fig trees on the banks of the Ganges river, with a large number of his followers. When the fruits were eaten, all the parrots left the grove, except the parrot king, who was well contented with whatever was left in the tree where he dwelt, be it shoot or leaf or bark. Sakka, knowing this and wanting to test the virtue of the parrot king, withered up the tree by his supernormal power. Then, assuming the form of geese, Sakka and his queen, Sujata, came to where the parrot king was and asked him why he did not leave the old withered tree as the others had done and why he did not go to other trees which were still bearing fruits. The parrot king replied, "Because of a feeling of gratitude towards the tree I did not leave and as long as I could get just enough food to sustain myself I shall not forsake it. It would be ungrateful for me to desert this tree even though it be inanimate."

Much impressed by this reply, Sakka revealed himself. He took water from the Ganges and poured it over the withered fig tree and instantly, it was rejuvenated; it stood with branches lush and green, and fully decked with fruits. Thus, the wise even as animals are not greedy; they are contented with whatever is available.

The parrot king in the story was the Buddha himself; Sakka was Anuruddha.


Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 32: A bhikkhu who takes delight in mindfulness and sees danger in negligence will not fall away*, he is, indeed, very close to Nibbana.

At the end of the discourse, Thera Tissa attained arahatship.


* will not fall away: It means, will not fall away from Tranquillity and Insight Development Practice and is assured of attaining Magga and Phalla. (The Commentary)

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Sep 07, 2013 12:59 pm

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

This is such a lovely story about an angel who was reborn on planet earth..but always in love, yearned to be with her deva-husband...Oh what a love story :heart: .... In Thai Tipitaka..no sex in heaven..just love..sweet love !!

Never My Love: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7PKeSsegho

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Patipujika Kumari : The Flower-Angel
[Translated from the Pali by Daw Mya Tin, M.A.]

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (48) of this book, with reference to Patipujika Kumari.

Patipujika Kumari was a lady from Savatthi. She married at the age of sixteen and had four sons. She was a virtuous as well as a generous lady, who loved to make offerings of food and other requisites to the bhikkhus. She would often go to the monastery and clean up the premises, fill the pots and jars with water and perform other services. Patipujika also possessed Jatissara Knowledge through which she remembered that in her previous existence she was one of the numerous wives of Malabhari, in the deva world of Tavatimsa. She also remembered that she had passed away from there when all of them were out in the garden enjoying themselves, plucking and picking flowers. So, every time she made offerings to the bhikkhus or performed any other meritorious act, she would pray that she might be reborn in the Tavatimsa realm as a wife of Malabhari, her previous husband.

One day, Patipujika fell ill and passed away that same evening. As she had so ardently wished, she was reborn in Tavatimsa deva world as a wife of Malabhari. As one hundred years in the human world is equivalent to just one day in Tavatimsa world, Malabhari and his other wives were still in the garden enjoying themselves and Patipujika was barely missed by them. So, when she rejoined them, Malabhari asked her where she had been the whole morning. She then told him about her passing away from Tavatimsa, her rebirth in the human world, her marriage to a man and also about how she had given birth to four sons, her passing away from there and finally her return to Tavatimsa.

When the bhikkhus learned about the death of Patipujika, they were stricken with grief. They went to the Buddha and reported that Patipujika, who was offering alms-food to them early in the morning, had passed away in the evening. To them the Buddha replied that the life of beings was very brief; and that before they could hardly be satiated in their sensual pleasures, they were overpowered by Death.

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 48: Like one who picks and chooses flowers, a man who has his mind attached to sensual pleasures and is insatiate in them is over powered by Death.


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