Dharma Wheel

A Buddhist discussion forum on Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism
It is currently Tue Dec 23, 2014 4:03 am

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 190 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 3:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
shaunc wrote:
Thanks for posting these stories on the forum. This is my favourite thread. Also thanks for the photos, my youngest daughter loves them.


Sawaddee Ka ..Shaunc,

I truly appreciate your reply..very encouraging :thanks:

tidathep :namaste:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 4:16 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Sabhiya: The Dialectician With 20 Questions

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I'm curious about Sabhiya who attained Arahantship after listening to the Buddha's preaching; that reminds me of
Bahiya/KumaraKassapa... So I search for their names. Here is what I found :

*************

Sabhiya: The Dialectician With 20 Questions
[http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_names/sa/sabhiya.htm]


Sabhiya's mother was a nobleman's daughter whose parents had committed her to the charge of a Paribbājaka, that she might learn various doctrines and usages. The Paribbājaka seduced her, and, when she was with child, the fraternity abandoned her. Her child
was born in the open (sabhāyam), while she was wandering about alone.. hence his name.

When Sabhiya grew up he, in his turn, became a Paribbaajaka and was famous as a dialectician. He had a hermitage by the city gate, where he gave lessons to the sons of noblemen and others. He devised twenty questions, which he put before recluses and brahmins, but none could answer them. These questions had been handed on to him by his mother who had developed insight and had been reborn in a Brahma world. (But see Sabhiya Sutta 1). Then, as related in the Sabhiya Sutta 1, Sabhiya visited the Buddha in Veluvana and, at the end of the discussion, entered the Order, where, developing insight, he won arahantship.

Note: According to the Theragāthā Commentary (ThagA.i.382), quoted also in the Sutta Nipāta Commentary, the questions were formulated by Sabhiya's mother, who, feeling revulsion for her womanhood, developed the jhānas and was reborn in a Brahma world. But the Sutta Nipāta Commentary itself (SNA.ii.421) says that they were taught to Sabhiya by an anāgāmī Brahmā, who had been a fellow celibate of Sabhiya in the time of Kassapa Buddha's dispensation. The Sutta is also called Sabhiya pucchā, and is given (E.g., DA.i.155) as an example of the Buddha's sabbaññupavārana, his willingness to answer any question whatever without restriction.

---------

In the time of Kakusandha Buddha he was a householder and gave the Buddha a pair of sandals. ****After Kassapa Buddha's death he, with six others, joined the Order and lived in the forest. Failing to develop jhaana, they went to the top of a mountain, determined to reach some attainment or to die of starvation. The eldest became an arahant, the next became an anaagaamii and was reborn in
the Suddhaavasaa Brahma Heaven. The remaining five died without achieving their goals. These five were, in this Gautama Buddha's era, Pukkusaati, Sabhiya, Baahiya, Kumaarakassapa and Dabbamallaputta. [I posted their amazing stories @ Dhamma Wheel(yawares)]

----------
Note: The 5 unlucky guys who had failed to attain Arahantship back then, 4 of them KumaraKassapa,Dabbamallaputta,Sabhiya and Baahiya became Arahans after listening to the Gautama Buddha's teaching....But Pukkusati attained Anagami Fruition( I'll post his story tomorrow).

***I don't know how many lives they had gone through before the final success! This explains that what looks like an easy achievement is indeed hard earned.***

The anaagaamii(friend), who was reborn in the Suddhaavasaa Brahma Heaven, came down to help Baahiya/KumaraKassapa by giving them questions to ask the Buddha...After listening to the Buddha's answers, both Baahiya and Kumaarakassapa became Arahants.

Pukkusaati turned into Anaagaamii after listening to the Buddha (Dhatu Vibhanga Sutta, MN 140). Dabbamallaputta attained Arahatship at 7 years old when a monk shaved his last lock of hair on his ordination day as a samanera.

***********

Love Buddhas/dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 2:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Pukkusáti: The King Who Became A Wanderer/Anagamin

Sawaddee ka :namaste:

I so love this story..and they say that Karl Gjellerup wrote the love story of Kamanita And Vasitthi... Karl wrote that Kamanita met the Buddha, stayed in the same room, conversed with him all night.. but failed to realize that the great bhikkhu he talked to..was the Buddha who he travelled nights/days to meet!!! Please read my KAMANITA AND VASITTHI that I posed @ Dhamma Wheel..wonderful story!!!

Image Image
Karl Gjellerup

Image
กามนิต-วาสิฏฐี in heaven(The Pilgrim Kamanita )

Image
Thai movie..Kamanita And Vasitthi

*******************

Pukkusáti: The King Who Became A Wanderer/Anagamin
[Dhamma Portal]


A young monk whom the Buddha met at the house of Bhaggava, the potter, in Rájagaha. Pukkusáti was already occupying the guest room of the house, and the Buddha asked to be allowed to share it, to which Pukkusáti readily agreed. They sat together for sometime in silence, and then the Buddha preached the Dhátuvibhanga Sutta. Pukkusáti recognised the Buddha at the end of the sermon and begged his forgiveness for not having paid him due honour; he then begged to have the upasampadá conferred on him. The Buddha consented and sent him to procure a begging bowl and a robe. On the way Pukkusáti was gored to death by a mad cow. When this was reported to the Buddha, he said that Pukkusáti was an Anágámin and had been born in the realms above, never more to return. M.iii.237 47. In this context Pukkusáti is spoken of as a kulaputta (iii.238); see also J.iv.180 and DhA.ii.35.

In his comments on the Dhátuvibhanga Sutta, Buddhaghosa gives a long account of Pukkusáti. MA.ii.979 ff. Cp. the story of Tissa, king of Roruva (ThagA.i.199f.)

He had been the king of Takkasilá, contemporary of Bimbisára and of about the same age. A friendly alliance was established between the two kings through the medium of merchants who travelled between the two countries for purposes of trade. In the course of time, although the two kings had never seen each other, there grew up between them a deep bond of affection. Pukkusáti once sent to Bimbisára, as a gift, eight priceless garments in lacquered caskets. This gift was accepted at a special meeting of the whole court, and Bimbisára having nothing of a material nature, which he considered precious enough to send to Pukkusáti, conceived the idea of acquainting Pukkusáti with the appearance in the world of the Three Jewels (ratanáni) the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Sangha. He had inscribed on a golden plate, four cubits long and a span in breadth, descriptions of these Three Jewels and of various tenets of the Buddha's teachings, such as the satipattháná, the Noble Eightfold Path, and the Thirty seven factors of Enlightenment. This plate was placed in the innermost of several caskets of various precious substances, and was taken in procession on the back of the state elephant up to the frontier of Bimbisira's kingdom. Similar honours were paid to it by the chiefs of other territories, through which lay the route to Takkasilá.

When Pukkusáti, in the solitude of his chamber, read the inscription on the plate, he was filled with boundless joy and decided to renounce the world. He cut off his hair, donned the yellow robes of a monk, and left the palace alone amid the lamentations of his subjects. He travelled the one hundred and ninety two leagues to Sávatthi, passing the gates of Jetavana; but having understood from Bimbisára's letter that the Buddha was at Rájagaha, he omitted to enquire for him at Jetavana, and travelled on forty five leagues more to Rájagaha, only to find that the Buddha was all the time in Sávatthi. As it was then evening, he took lodging in Bhaggava's house. The Buddha, with his divine eye, saw what was in store for Pukkusáti, and travelling on foot from Sávatthi, reached Bhaggava's house at sundown, and, waiting his opportunity, engaged Pukkusáti in talk and preached to him the Dhátuvibhanga Sutta, as related above. After his untimely death* Pukkusáti was born in the Avihá world, where, together with six others, he became an arahant at the moment of his birth .

***The cow that killed Pukkusáti is said to have been a Yakkhiní who was a cow in one hundred births. In her last birth as a cow, she killed, in addition to Pukkusáti, Báhiya Dáruciriya, Tambadáthika, and Suppabuddha the leper (DhA.ii.35).

Pukkhusáti was one of seven monks who, in the time of Kassapa Buddha, decided to abstain from eating until they should attain arahantship. They lived on the top of a mountain. The senior monk attained arahantship, the second became an anágámí, but the remaining five died of starvation and were reborn in Tusita. In this age they became, respectively, Pukkusáti, Kumára Kassapa, Bahiya-Dárucíriya, Dabba Mallaputta and Sabhiya.

************
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 1:48 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

Today is Uposatha Day, no songs/no movies/no lipstick for me. Since I mentioned about Suppabuddha and the cow-serial-killer yesterday...this Tuesday, please let me share this story as to give you the clues..why Suppabuddha became a leper..why the cow was a serial-killer...why oh why???

************

Suppabuddha The Leper
[Palikanon.com]


Suppabuddha. A poor leper of Rājagaha, who, one day seated in the outer circle of people, heard the Buddha preach and became a sotāpanna. While waiting the departure of the crowd so that he could pay homage to the Buddha and express his gratitude, Sakka, desiring to test him, approached him and offered him untold wealth if he would repudiate the Buddha, his teachings, and the Order. But although Sakka revealed his identity, Suppabuddha rebuked him for a fool und said he had no need of more wealth, because he possessed already the seven stores of Ariyadhana (Noble Wealth). Sakka reported this conversation to the Buddha, who said that no power in the world would change Suppabuddha. Soon after, Suppabuddha visited the Buddha, and, having worshipped him, was on his way to the city when he was gored to death by a cow, the cow which killed also Pukkusāti, Bāhiya Dāruciriya and Tambadāthika.

The cow was a Yakkhinī, who had once been a courtesan. These four men had then been sons of wealthy merchants, who, having taken her one day to a pleasure garden, took their pleasure with her. In the evening they killed her und took the jewels and money which they themselves had given her. At the moment of her death she had vowed vengeance on them und had killed them in one hundred existences.

In a previous birth, Suppabuddha had insulted the Pacceka Buddha Tagarasikhī by calling him a "leper" (kutthi) - because he wore a patched robe - and by spitting on him...***Now we know that was why he became a leper and was killed by the mad cow!!***

*************
Love Buddhas/Dhamma
tidathepImage


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 2:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Tambadathika : The Excecutioner And Sariputta Thera

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

Today, I have the story of the last victim of the mad cow-serial-killer to present to you all.

I learn a lesson from this story that I should never make a vow to revenge anyone, because that evil intention can cause me to reborn as a mad cow or a bad person. :thinking:

*************
Tambadathika : The Excecutioner And Sariputta Thera
[Wisdom Library]


A public executioner of Rajagaha. He had copper coloured teeth and tawny skin, and his body was covered with scars. He wished to join a band of thieves, but, for some time, the ringleader refused to admit him on account of his inordinately cruel looks. In the end he was admitted; but when the thieves were captured and no one could be found willing to kill as many as five hundred of them, Tambadathika agreed to do it for a reward, and slew all his colleagues. He was afterwards appointed public executioner and held the post for fifty five years. When he became too old to behead a man with one blow, another was appointed in his place, and he was deprived of the four perquisites to which he had, for so many years, been entitled - old clothes, milk porridge made with fresh ghee, jasmine flowers, and perfumes.

On the day on which he was deposed from office, he gave orders for milk porridge to be cooked, and having bathed and decked himself out, he was about to eat, when Sariputta, out of compassion for him, appeared at his door. Tambadathika invited the Elder in and entertained him hospitably. When Sariputta began the words of thanksgiving, his host could not concentrate his thoughts, being worried by memories of his past wickedness. Sariputta consoled him by representing to him that he had merely carried out the kings orders. At the end of the sermon, Tambadathika developed the qualities necessary for becoming a Sotapanna. When Sariputta left, Tambadathika accompanied him on his way, but on the way back he was gored to death by a cow.

The cow was a Yakkhini who also killed:

Pukkusati,

Bahiya Daruciriya

Suppabuddha

(DhA.ii.35; UdA.289).

The Buddha said he had been reborn in the Tusita world. DhA.ii.203ff.
*********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 3:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Sakuntala And King Dushyanta

Sawaddee Ka

This is a beautiful story of loving-kindness between birds and a babygirl and the sage who adopted a babygirl with loving-kindness...Oh this story is better than Hollywood love-stories.Sakuntala is considered to be the hottest romantic Indian story, which was ever written with full of romance and suspense. It is a love story between world's the most beautiful woman and the handsome brave young king of Hastinapur.The story has often been printed, and there are many translations into the languages of Europe. Oh yes, Thai people are so crazy about "Sakuntala", I/my mom went to see this 'Play' at the Thai National Theatre 2 times.

Image
Indian....Sakuntala Movie

Image
Thai...Sakuntala movie

:heart: Sakuntala And King Dushyanta :heart:
[From http://kunjunny.blogspot.com]


Sakuntala was the daughter of sage Viswamitra born of the celestial damsel,
Menaka. Her beauty was incomparable in the three worlds.
The sage was performing
long years of penance performing a number of sacrificial rituals (Yajna) that
terrified Indra, the king of gods. There is a tradition that one who performed
one hundred such rituals qualified himself to the heavenly throne. Indra wanted
to disturb the meditation of Viswamitra by whatever means at his disposal. The
first and easiest choice fell on Menaka, one of the most beautiful and talented
among the celestial damsels. That was normally an unfailing tool in the hands of
the king of gods.

Menaka was apprehensive of the sage and his powers from meditation. Indra
assured her of her safety. That was how the heavenly lady set out on her
mission. Menaka sang sweetly and danced seductively and waited for the sage to
open his eyes. When it was time for sage Viswamitra to open his eyes a gentle
breeze blew, apparently instigated by Indra, to expose the curves of Menaka.
Indra did not go wrong in his calculation.The pent up emotions of sage
Viswamitra was roused at the sight of the pretty and voluptuous Menaka. The
result was their union and the birth of a pretty babygirl. It is said Menaka
abandoned her at birth, as nursing the baby was not part of the deal.


Viswamitra's only concern was to get back to his penance and make up for all the
damage that was done to it by his not so pious adventure. The hapless baby found
only the company of some little birds that perched around and took care of her.

Sage Kanav happened to pass by the scene and stumbled upon the abandoned child.
He adopted the babygirl out of kindness and left it under the care of his good
lady. The baby was named Sakuntala as she was saved by the little birds known by
the name, Sakunta.

------

King Dushyanta

It is said that Dushyanta presided over an empire that spread as far as the
oceans on all sides. He was a just king and ruled the land strictly by the law.
There was plenty everywhere and the people lived happily without fear of robbers
and thieves.

The hunting expedition

The kings in those days frequently used to go hunting. It was partly for the fun
and partly to protect hermits from wild animals, and demons who harassed them.
One day Dushyanta set on such an expedition. An army of assistants accompanied
the king with hunting equipment and taking with them horses and dogs to chase
game animals. The citizens watched with pride as their king march through the
land and were all in his praise looking at his handsome figure.

The party hunted in a forest not too far away from the palace. What lay ahead
was a place of heavenly beauty and absolute peace. Green meadows were
interspersed with trees in full blossom. Flowers that fell from the trees made
patterns over the meadows. Birds of various types sang with an abandon. Bees sat
on tree trunks and helped themselves lavishly on honey that was in plenty. Vedic
hymns gently resonated out of a few hermitages that were concealed behind the
thick growth of trees. There was a river that quietly flowed behind the row of
the hermits' huts. Perfect tranquility prevailed over the entire terrain.

One day while the king was hunting a golden deer in the woods met with an
accident and had to be attended with first aid. So the hunting party proceeded
to the sage Kanav Ashram, which was the nearest one. It was god's coincidence
and providence that except Sakuntala no other human being was present in the
Ashram.

Therefore as desired by destiny Sakuntala had to attend the wounded prince.
Seeing the divine and extraordinary beauty of Sakuntala, king Dushyanta could
not take his eyes off her, and her hospitality made him fall in love with her at
once.
She too was attracted by the fine-looking handsome king. They both fell in
love with each other at the first sight. As if "Kamdev" the god of love had
striked both with his arrows of love. It seemed as if god has stopped the time
just to enjoy the beautiful experience of love between two young extraordinary
beings.

When I look into your eyes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=of6oocb9lMw

When their love reached its pinnacle, one day Dushyanta proposed Sakuntala to
marry him. Both of them got married in front of goddess in the nearest temple,
by exchanging garlands of flowers in the Gandharva cult.The two accepted each
other as husband and wife. Only the birds and trees of the hermitage stood
witness for the unusual marriage.

Next day Dushyanta got news that his father was ill and he had to leave the
ashram. Unwilling to leave his bride behind the ashram but only to attend his
ailing father he left the ashram. He gave a ruby ring which was his kingly sign
and went to his castle with a promise to tell his parents about their marriage
and take her to his kingdom very soon.

As time passed by, king Dushyanta didn't returned. Slowly the time ticked away
and Sakuntala became pregnant. Her father sage Kanav understanding the delicate
situation without wasting time took Sakuntala to Hastinapur. But fate had
something else stored for Sakuntala. King Dushyanta was unable to remember
Sakuntala nor remember his marriage with her. After lot of persuasion, Dushyanta
asked Sakuntala about the proof that they both got married.


Miss you in a heartbeat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hO_pZm6LCW0

Suddenly she remembered the ruby ring which Dushyanta gave her at the time of
separation. But Alas! She lost it. The ruby ring which was given to her by
Dushyanta was lost in a river on her travel to Hastinapur. At that time she
remembered the "Curse" given by sage Durvasa when once he visited the ashram and
was asking about sage Kanav but Sakuntala was lost in the thoughts of Dushyanta
and didn't pay attention to him. Seeing her attitude he at once gave the curse
that whoever she was remembering at that moment that person should forget her.

As soon as sage Kanav came back and hearing the curse by sage Durvasa he pleaded
him to forgive her. Then sage Durvasa told him that a curse couldn't be taken
back but it could be remedied. So he gave a relief by saying that the person who
saw the thing which was very dear to both, then he would remember. So she lost
the ring and couldn't prove her marriage, and with heavy heart came back to her
Ashram in the forest.

Meanwhile Sakuntala gave birth to a beautiful babyboy and he was being reared by
the saints of Ashram. Sage Kanav performed all the ceremonies that were due for
a royal child from birth onwards. The boy grew playing with the wild animals
that roamed near the hermitage and soon was acclaimed to be one of extraordinary
strength and courage. Accordingly, he was named Sarvadamana or one who subdued
all around him.


There is a saying time is very powerful, it so happened when Sakunlata on her
way to Hastinapur lost the ruby ring in the river, which was swallowed by a big
fish. The same fish was caught and brought by the fisherman tribe as a gift to
king Dushyanta. While cutting the fish the royal cook found the ruby ring and
came running to the king Dushyanta. The moment Dushyanta saw the ring his lost
memory came back like a flash to him. He immediately set out to meet Sakuntala.
When he found her, he took her back to his kingdom along with his son who was
given a royal name, Bharata.


Trying to get to you: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xtfazXu45U

Note: Prince Bharata became a legend, the head of a long race of kings, who has
given his name to India (Bharatavarsha), and the wars of whose descendants are
sung in the Mahabharata.


****************
Love story makes me happy :reading:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 4:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Sawaddee Ka :hi:

Yesterday, I read an amazing story posted by my upasika-friend @ facebook..I like it very much, so I translated into my Thailish for you all to enjoy.

Image

The Three-Brothers-Buddha Statues
[Misakaman Rujavichai posted @ Facebook]


Thera Chorb Thanasamo told this story to people who came to do meritorious deeds @ Wat Tha-Kaak where The Three-Brothers-Buddha Statues were situated :

These Three-Brothers-Buddha Statues were built by three brothers, who truly had ultimate saddha in the Buddha, at Nakoon town. They prayed to be born together in the next Buddha's era. The eldest brother built the Buddha statue with the Muccalinda Naga, the other 2 brothers built the two Buddha statues in meditation.

After the three-brothers died, a merchant loaded these statues in his wagon..intended to sell them at Chiang-Khan town..he planned to cross the Mae-Khong-River to Laos..unfortunately Chiang-Khan was plague by CHOLERA, the merchant died. So the Three-Brothers-Buddha Statues were left in a forest on the way to town.

Town-people found these statues with the wagon..they tried to drive the wagon to Chiang-Khan, but the bulls refused to pull the wagon to Chiang-Khan..those bulls dragged the wagon to the new road for a very long time..then stopped at Wat Tha-Kaak which was left empty..no monks there. After drinking water in the pool at the wat, the bulls never moved anywhere..just stopped right there. So people decided to place the 3 Brothers-Buddha Statues at Wat Tha-Kaak's vihara.

Since then, people claimed that they often saw nagas came to stay by these statues..nobody dared to hurt these nagas.

***These 3 Brothers-Buddha Statues had been at Wat Tha-Kaak for over 100 years now.
-----
Note: This wat is quite close to Mae-Khong River..borderline Thailand with Laos..people believe there are naga kings living under the river in a beautiful vimana called "Badarn"...on the full moon days at nights, these naga kings/queens will surface to play with their magical fire that look like fireworks(I've heard about these naga stories since I was quite young..very entertaining indeed!!)
*********
tidathep :namaste:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 6:44 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Sona-Kutikanna And MahaKaccana

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

This Saturday morning, I went to visit my old-age-friend who just moved into her new apartment. I know she loves jasmine flowers, so I made a lei of jasmines for her. When I entered her apt..I was so uncomfortable, it smelled so bad..my jasmine lei couldn't help the apt. to smell better. I stayed for 10 minutes..then made excuse to leave(I felt dizzy). On the way back home, I prayed that I would never be born poor, no money is the root of all unpleasant things!!

***************
Sona-Kutikanna
[Palikanon.com]


Sona-Kutikanna. A Thera, declared chief(Etadagga) - of those possessing clear utterance (A.i.24). He was the son of Kālī Kuraragharikā.

A little while before the birth of the child, Kālī went to her parents' house in Rājagaha, and one day, as she was cooling herself, she heard a conversation between two Yakkhas, Sātāgira and Hemavata. As she listened to their talk, her mind was filled with thoughts of the virtues of the Buddha, and she became a sotāpanna. That same night the child was born and was called Sona. His mother later returned to Kuraraghara. At that time Mahā Kaccāna lived near by and often visited her home. Sona was very attached to him, and was later ordained by him. Three years later he received the upasampadā, and, with Mahā Kaccāna’s leave, visited the, Buddha. Kālī gave him a large carpet to spread in the Buddha's Gandhakuti.

When Sona arrived at the Gandhakuti, he worshipped the Buddha, who asked Ananda to find him a lodging. Ananda, reading the Buddha's thoughts, spread a rug in the Buddha's chamber. Late at night Sona went to bed, and, very early the next morning, the Buddha woke him and asked him to recite the Dhamma. Sona recited the whole of the Atthakavagga, which he had learnt from Mahā Kaccāna. At the end of the recital the Buddha applauded him and gave him a boon. Sona asked for the "Vinaya-dharapañcamaganena upasampadā, which Kaccāna had asked him to choose. (This means permission to admit a monk into the Order with a chapter of only five monks, one of whom was versed in the Vinaya. Later he returned to Kuraraghara and visited his mother's house. She had heard of the Buddha's applause from the devas, and wished Sona to recite the Dhamma just as he had done before the Buddha, and this he did.

The Dhammapada Commentary says (DhA.iv.103f) that, on the day when Sona recited the Dhamma in Kuraraghara, Kālī went to listen to him, leaving only one female slave in the house. Her house had seven walls and fortified gates and savage dogs on leash. Molten lead flowed round the walls at night, and in the night it proved a slippery surface, difficult to walk on. Nine hundred thieves had been awaiting a chance of breaking into the house, and this day they saw their opportunity. They stationed one of their number to watch Kālī going to the monastery, and to kill her if she started homewards after the thieves entered her house. When they came her female servant ran to the monastery to tell her about it. But she would not be disturbed and sent her back. Again the servant went, and again she was sent back. When the thief, stationed near Kālī, saw her extraordinary piety, he was filled with remorse, and, at the end of the sermon, begged her forgiveness. All the nine hundred thieves joined the Order under Sona Kutikanna, and on the day they became arahants the Buddha appeared before them in a ray of light to encourage them.

According to the Udāna Commentary (UdA.307), Sona was called Kutikanna because he wore ear ornaments worth one crore (koti). It is said that he once went with a caravan to Ujjeni, and when the caravan stopped for the night he slept away from the rest of its members. The caravan started very early and nobody waked Sona. When he finally awoke, he ran along the road till he came to a large tree. There he saw an ugly man tearing off his own flesh and eating it. On enquiry, Sona learnt that he had been a wicked merchant of Bhārukaccha, who had been born as a peta because he had deceived his patrons. This revelation filled Sona with great misgivings, which were increased by the sight of two peta boys with blood pouring out of their lips. They had been youths, also of Bhārukaccha, who had found fault with their mother for feeding an arahant monk. When Sona returned from Ujjeni he consulted Mahā Kaccāna about these things, and resolved to enter the Order.

The Vinaya says (Vin.i.195f) that when Kaccāna wished to confer the higher ordination on Sona, it was three years before he could get together the necessary chapter of ten monks. This was because there were but few monks in Avanti and in the Southern Country; hence Sona's request to the Buddha that he should allow five monks to officiate in Avanti. Other boons asked for by Sona and allowed by the Buddha were:

•(1) Permission to use, in Avanti, shoes with thick linings, because the soil of Avanti was black and always muddy;
•(2) permission to bath constantly;
•(3) to use skins for coverlets;
•(4) to accept robes set apart for absent monks even after the lapse of ten days.

-----------
NOTE: In the time of Padumuttara Buddha, Sona had resolved to win this eminence. In the time of Vipassī Buddha, he was a member of the Order and sewed a robe for a monk. Later he was a tailor of Benares and mended a Pacceka Buddha's robe.

*********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :namaste:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2013 4:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
A Poor Woman And Yamaraja

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I read this story @ Thai Tipitaka...and I asked my slave #1, then #2 to translate into English...both slaves refused!! So I had to translate this nice story by myself ( Tep/daughter always accuse me to be a slave-driver...well, I love to have slaves...I'm Yawaraja!!)

******************
A Poor Woman And Yamaraja
[Thai Tipitaka]


The Buddha said that people who arranged or sponsored the ordinations for their sons, relatives, friends etc. with true saddha in the Buddha/sassana, they would never go to hell. Then he told this story:

Once upon a time, there was a poor woman..her son asked her permission to be ordained as a monk, but the mother denied. So the son ran away to a temple and asked to join the Buddha's Order. One day, this woman went into the forest to gather some woods, on the way back home, she sat under a shady tree and fell asleep. She dreamt that Yamaraja appeared before her and asked if she ever had done good deeds in her life. When she said 'no'..Yamaraja just took her to hell..when she saw hell-fire, she told Yamaraja that the color of hell-fire looked pretty much like her son's monk-robe. When Yamaraja acknowledged that her son joined the Buddha's Order, he took her out of hell, back to earth... at the shady tree. When the poor woman woke up, she was so delighted that because of her son became a monk, preventing her from burning in hell. Since that day, she had true saddha in the Buddha and she always gave alms-food to her son/monks everyday till she died. And she was reborn into a heaven.

********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep/slave :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2013 4:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Nandaka Thera: The Etadagga For Advising Bhikkhunis

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I read this story for the very first time! I love it so much..please let me share with you all..
This morning I made 4 jasmine leis for my Buddhas-shrines...I learned how to do many styles of leis when I was in girls-school.

Image

Nandaka Thera: The Etadagga For Advising Bhikkhunis
[Palikanon.com]


A householder of Savatthi. (The Apadāna (ii.499) says he belonged to a rich clan of merchants and that he entered the Order at the ceremony of dedication of Jetavana.)

Having entered the Order after hearing a sermon of the Buddha, he developed insight and soon attained arahantship. Once, at the Buddha's request, he preached a sermon to the nuns; on the first day they became sotāpannas, and, on the second, five hundred of them attained arahantship. From that time the Buddha declared him foremost among exhorters of the nuns. [A.i.25. The sermon he preached is known as the Nandakovada Sutta. The Anguttara Commentary (i.173) says that the nuns were Sakyan maidens who had entered the Order with Pajāpatī. At first Nandaka was reluctant to preach to them, they having been his wives in a previous birth when he was king, and he feared the calumny of his colleagues who might suggest that he wished to see his former companions. He, therefore, sent another monk in his place; but the Buddha, knowing that only Nanda's preaching would effect the nuns' release, insisted on his going.]

The Theragāthā (vs.279 82) contains several verses uttered by him to a woman to whom he was once married. She met him begging alms in Savatthi and smiled to him with sinful heart.

*****His aspiration after eminence was formed in the time of Padumuttara Buddha, when he heard a disciple of that Buddha declared foremost among exhorters of nuns. He offered the Buddha a very costly robe and illuminated his bodhi tree. In the time of Kakusandha Buddha he was a karavīka bird and delighted the Buddha with his song. Later, he was a peacock, and sang three times daily at the door of a Pacceka Buddha's cell.

The Anguttara Nikaya attributes two discourses to Nandaka. The first (A.i.193f. See sv., Sālha) was preached at the Migāramātupasāda and takes the form of a discussion with Sālha, Migāra's grandson, and Rohana, Pekkhuniya's grandson - on greed, covetousness, malice and delusion, and the benefits following their destruction. The second discourse is a sermon addressed to the monks at the waiting hall at Jetavana. It is said that the Buddha was attracted to the spot by the sound of Nandaka's preaching, and, finding the door locked, stood for a long time outside, listening (A.iv.358ff.; throughout the three watches of the night says the Commentary, AA.ii.794; also MA.i.348). When his back began to ache he knocked at the door, and, having entered, told Nandaka that he had been waiting until the end of his discourse to speak to him. Nandaka expressed his regret that he should have kept the Buddha waiting and pleaded ignorance of his presence. The Buddha, conscious of Nandaka's remorse, went on to praise his sermon, and said that the preaching of such sermons was the duty of all pious monks. When the Buddha left, Nandaka resumed his sermon, and told his audience of the five results of listening to the Dhamma in due season.

*****The Majjhima Commentary (ii.1019) states that Nandaka was once the leader of a guild of five hundred slaves of Benares and that Pajapati Gotami was his wife. One day, while fetching water, his wife noticed five hundred Pacceka Buddhas enter the city, and, on her return, she witnessed their departure. On enquiry, she learnt that they had applied to a merchant for lodgings for the rainy season, but that he had been unable to help. She undertook the care of them and, having enlisted the support of all her companions and their husbands, she and her husband ministered to the Pacceka Buddhas. As a result, they were born together as man and wife for many births, as were their helpers. In one birth Nandaka was king, and all the women became his wives. In this birth, the women were born as Pajapati's companions, and they left the world in her company. To them was the Nandakovada Sutta preached.

*********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Uggata : The Great Upasaka [Etadagga For Waiting On The Order (sanghupatthākānam)]

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

This story is so new to me..I read it first time! I'm so surprised that a drunken man could be sobered real quick when seeing the Buddha..and became an Anagami after listening to the Buddha's preaching!! I think I'll keep on loving the Buddhas much more everyday, may be they'll have pity on me and preach me the dhammas that will make me attain Anagami Fruition!!

***********
Uggata : The Great Upasaka [Etadagga For Waiting On The Order (sanghupatthākānam)]
[Palikanon.com]


Uggata (-Gahapati).-A householder of Hatthigāma(ka) of the Vajji country. Among householders he was declared by the Buddha to be the best of those who waited on the Order (sanghupatthākānam). On his father's death he was appointed to the post of setthi. Once when the Buddha went to Hatthigāma during a tour and was staying in the Nāgavanuyyāna there, Ugga came to the pleasance, with dancers, at the conclusion of a drinking-feast of seven days' duration. At the sight of the Buddha he was seized with great shame and his intoxication vanished. The Buddha preached to him and he became an anāgāmī. Thereupon he dismissed his dancers and devoted himself to looking after members of the Sangha. Devas visited him at night and told him of the attainments of various monks, suggesting that he should choose only the eminent ones as the recipients of his gifts. But what he gave, he gave to all with equal delight.

The Buddha once stated that Ugga was possessed of eight special and wonderful qualities. One of the monks, hearing the Buddha's statement, went to Ugga and asked him what these qualities were. Ugga replied that he was not aware of what the Buddha had in mind and proceeded to explain eight wonderful things that had happened to him, viz.:
•(1) As soon as he saw the Buddha, his state of drunkenness vanished and he made obeisance to the Buddha, who talked to him on various topics, such as dāna, sīla, etc.
•(2) When the Buddha saw that Ugga's mind was ready, he preached to him the Four Truths, which he understood and realised.
•(3) He had had four young and beautiful wives; when he took the vow of celibacy, he made ample provision for them; for one of them he obtained the husband of her choice, because she so desired, and this he did with no tinge of jealousy.
•(4) All his immense wealth he shared with men of good and lovely conduct.
•(5) On whatever monk he waited, he did it with whole-heartedness; to the monk's preaching he listened earnestly; if the monk did not preach, Ugga himself taught him the doctrine.
•(6) Devas told him of the different attainments of various monks, but he gave to all alike, without distinction.
•(7) He felt no pride that he should hold converse with devas.
•(8) He did not worry about death because the Buddha had assured him that he would never more return to this world.


The monk reports this conversation to the Buddha and the Buddha tells him that these were the very qualities he had in mind when praising Ugga.

The Samyutta Nikāya (Vajjī Sutta, S.iv.109f) records a visit paid to the Buddha by Ugga, at Hatthigāmaka. He asked the Buddha why it was that some beings attained full freedom in this very life, while others did not. Because of grasping, says the Buddha.
------------
NOTE: Ugga had been a householder in the time of Padumuttara Buddha. He once heard the Buddha preach and declare, at the end of his sermon, one of his lay disciples to be the best of those who waited on the Order. He wished for himself a similar attainment and did many good deeds towards that end.

*************
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2013 1:15 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Citta Macchikasandika: The Etadagga( Upasaka) for explaining the Teaching

Sawaddee Ka

In Thai Tipitaka, flowers of five colors showered from the sky when Citta gave his offerings to the Buddha...really inspired the king of Thailand to offer candles of 5 colors/flowers of 5 colors to the super monks/the Buddha-statues. And the jasmine leis with 5 different colors of flowers are more expensive than the usual leis. The story of Citta impressed me so much that I wish I/Tep could be just like him. Citta is always my #1 great upasaka.

Image
The Buddha in Tavatimsa (Thai artist)

:heart: Citta Macchikasandika: The Etadagga( Upasaka) for explaining the Teaching. :heart:
[Palikanon.com]

Citta (called Cittagahapati).-A householder of Macchikāsanda, where he was Treasurer. He was later declared by the Buddha to be pre-eminent among laymen who preached the Doctrine. On the day of his birth the whole city was covered knee-deep with flowers of various hues, hence his name.

When Mahānāma visited Macchikāsanda, Citta, pleased with his demeanour, invited him to his park, the Ambātakārāma, and built for him a monastery there. And there the Elder preached to Citta the Salā-yatana-vibhatti and Citta became an Anāgāmī. Thereafter many monks visited the Ambātakārāma and accepted Citta's hospitality. Among them was Isidatta, a former acquaintance of Citta, but Isidatta left when he found that his identity had been discovered. Mahānāma and Mahaka did likewise, after having performed miracles at the request of Citta.

A Thera named Sudhamma was a permanent resident in the Ambātakārāma and was looked after by Citta. Once, when the two Chief Disciples and several other eminent Elders came to the Ambātakārāma, Citta invited first these and then Sudhamma; the latter, feeling slighted, blamed Citta beyond measure, but the Buddha, hearing of this, sent Sudhamma to ask for Citta's pardon.

Some time later, Citta visited the Buddha. He was accompanied by two thousand others and took with him five hundred cartloads of offerings to the Buddha and the Order. As he fell at the feet of the Buddha, flowers of five hues showered from the sky and the Buddha preached to him the Salāyatana-vibhatti. For a fortnight he continued distributing his gifts to the Order and the devas filled his carts with all kinds of valuables.

When Citta lay ill just before his death, devas visited him and advised him to wish for kingship among them, but he refused to aspire to anything so impermanent, and instructed the devas and his kinsfolk gathered round him, telling them of the Buddha and his teachings He is regarded as the ideal layman .

He owned a tributary village called Migapattaka (SA.iii.93).

--------

In the time of Padumuttara Buddha, Citta conceived his desire to be placed first among laymen in the teaching of the Dhamma.

In the time of Kassapa Buddha he was a huntsman. One day, seeing a monk in a glen, and being pleased thereat, he hurried home, prepared a meal and brought it to the monk, together with flowers he had gathered on the way. After the offering, he made a wish that he should never lack for tribute and that showers of flowers should fall on him. In the deva-world he surpassed all others in his great beauty (AA.i.209). In the Bhisa Jātaka (J.iii.314), he is identified with the Bodhisatta's servant.

Though Citta was not an arahant, he possessed the patisambhidā of a probationer (sekha). Vsm.442.

**********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 25, 2013 12:54 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
King Kiki And His 7 Virgin Daughters

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

Do you know that once upon a time, Khema, Uppalavanna, Patacara, Gotama, Dhammadinna, Mahamaya and Visakha were sisters/princesses and they lived celibate lives!!!

*******
King Kiki And His 7 Virgin Daughters
[Palikanon.com]


King of Benares at the time of the Buddha Kassapa. When the Buddha arrived in Benares, the king, having listened to his sermon, entertained the Buddha and his monks at the palace. When the Buddha was asked to spend the rainy season there he refused, as he had already accepted the invitation of Ghatikara of Vehalinga. Kiki was at first hurt by the refusal, but when the Buddha described Ghatikara's virtues, the king was pleased and sent five hundred cartloads of provisions to Ghatikara who, however, curtly refused the gift.

One of Kikī's daughters was Uracchadā, who attained arahantship at the age of sixteen. He had seven other daughters - Samanī, Samanā, Guttā, Bhikkhudāsikā, Dhammā, Sudhammā and Sanghadāsī - who, in this Buddha-age became respectively Khemā, Uppalavannā, Patācārā, Gotamā, Dhammadinnā, Mahāmāyā and Visākhā. J.iv.481; in the Ap.ii.561f, the names are Samanī, Samapaguttā, Bhikkhunī, Bhikkhadāyikā, Dhammā, etc., and they are mentioned as having lived celibate lives; see also Sattamba; both the Apadāna and the ThigA.17, 103f, omit the name of Mahāmāyā from this list and have, instead, the name of Bhaddā Kundalakesā, identifying her with Bhikkhadāyikā.

He had also a son, Pathavindhara (Puthuvindhara), who succeeded him to the throne. During the life of the Buddha Kassapa Kikī waited on him with many kinds of gifts, and at his death built one of the four gates outside the Buddha's cetiya. The gate was a league in width. According to the Anguttara Commentary, Kikī was the aggupatthāka of Kassapa.

In the Sanskrit books he is called Kikī, and is mentioned as owning a palace called Kokanada.

Note: According to Buddhaghosa (MA.ii.739), the palace was called
Kokanada(lotus), because it was built in the form of a hanging lotus.


***********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 12:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Mogharaja The Etadagga : His Good/Bad Deeds
Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

This is the story of Thera Mogharaja the etadagga for wearing rough robes, his great deeds and bad deeds are very interesting.

***************
Mogharaja The Etadagga : His Good/Bad Deeds
[Wisdom Library]


He belonged to a brahmin family and studied under Bavari as an ascetic. He was one of the sixteen pupils sent by Bavari to the Buddha. When Mogharaja had asked his question of the Buddha and had received the answer, he attained arahantship. He then attained distinction by wearing rough cloth which had been thrown away by caravaners, tailors, and dyers, and the Buddha declared him foremost among wearers of rough clothing. Later, through want of care and former kamma, pimples and the like broke out over his body. Judging that his lodging was infected, he spread a couch of straw in the Magadha field and lived there even during the winter. When the Buddha asked him how he fared in the cold, he replied that he was extremely happy.

In the time of Padumuttara Buddha, Mogharaja first resolved to win the eminence which was his. In the time of Atthadassi Buddha he was a brahmin teacher, and one day, while teaching his students, he saw the Buddha, and having worshipped him with great solemnity, he uttered six verses in his praise and offered him a gift of honey. Later, after sojourn in the deva worlds, he became a minister of King Katthavahana, and was sent by him, with one thousand others, to visit Kassapa Buddha. He heard the Buddha preach, entered the order, and lived the life of a monk for twenty thousand years.

Mogharaja is given as an example of one who attained arahantship by the development of investigation (vimamsam dhuram katva).

The Apadana contains two sets of verses in reference to Mogharaja. They seem to be parts of the same Apadana which have become separated. The first set gives an account of the meeting of Mogharaja with Atthadassi Buddha (see above) and includes the verses uttered by Mogharaja in praise of the Buddha. The second set contains an account of his meeting with Padumuttara Buddha and the resolves he made before him. It further mentions that, for one thousand years, in a later birth, Mogharaja suffered in hell, and that for five hundred births he suffered from skin diseases. This was because he had lighted a fire in the Buddhas cloister and had made the floor black. In his last birth, too, he suffered from a kuttharoga and could not sleep at night, hence his name (mogharajjasukham yasma Mogharaja tato aham). These verses also include the Mogharajamanava puccha.

***************
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 10:04 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Thera Puddhindhayaka And The Bodhi Tree
Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I love to read my Thai Tipitaka Book, not only I can understand everyword without using dictionary..but I can also find stories that not online. The bad part is...you all have to read them with my Thailish.

*************
Thera Puddhindhayaka And The Bodhi Tree
[Translated from the Thai Tipitaka by Yawares]


In the time of Gautama Buddha, when Thera Puddhindhayaka attained arahatship with Aphinna 6...With his devine-eyes...he recalled his great meritorious deeds that he did for the Vipassi Buddha's Bodhi Tree. And he told people about how his good deeds gave him such great result "Arahatship".

During Vipassi Budha's era, he was born into a nice family who adored the Vipassi Buddha. One day, on the way to the temple..he saw the Vipassi Buddha's Bodhi Tree, with his heart full of saddha...he started to clean up the place around the Bodhi Tree and covered the ground with sand...he built a shrine beneath the Bodhi Tree and decorated it so beautifully with scented-flowers/incenses burner & sticks. Since that day, he always came to pay homage and took care of the Bodhi Tree with so much love and saddha. After he died, he was reborn into the Tusita Deva World for a very long time. Then during the Gautama Buddha's era, he was reborn in a rich family and decided to join the Buddha's Order..finally he attained arahatship...all resulted from his Bodhi Tree meritorious deeds.

NOTE: According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Vipassi Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Patali tree (Bigonia Suaveolens) when he became enlightened.
Image

***********
****I might achieve something good from making jasmine leis/cutting fresh flowers everyday for mine/Tep's Buddhas-shrine.

Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2013 4:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
The Bhikkhu With Lotus-Scent Breath : The Word "Sadhu"

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I read this story in Thai @facebook ...amazing indeed! Believe it or not, my translation is much better than 'Bing'!!?? There are some Thai words/sentences that BING can never translate into understandable English!

Image

The Bhikkhu With Green-Lotus-Scent Breath : The Word "Sadhu"
[Translated from a Thai Dhammapada story by Yawares-bad-English]


Once upon a time, a man who lived in Savatthi, went to listen to the Buddha's preaching...overwhelmed with saddha, he really wanted to join the Buddha's Order. He went back home and told his wife about his decision to become a bhikkhu, his wife was very sad but agreed with his decision. Later King Pasenadi heard the news about this beautiful lady that her husband left her to become a bhikkhu. The king fell in love with her and asked her to come and live in his palace as his consort(as you all know how much King Pasenadi loved pretty women!!).

Pretty Woman: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHPgco6GQk8

One day, the king's bodyguard brought many beautiful/fragrant green lotuses for King Pasenadi. The king gave green lotuses to all of his favorite consorts including the bhikkhu's ex-wife who accepted the green lotus with pretty smile and then crying. The king asked why she cried, she said that the green lotus smelled so nice just like her ex-husband's breath and she truly missed him.

King Pasenadi wanted to prove her words..the next day he ordered his people to decorate the palace with all fragrant flowers except green lotuses..and he invited the Buddha and all of his bhikkhus to have alms-food in his palace. After the meal, the king whispered to his new consort to identify her ex-husband so he could ask the Buddha's permission to let that bhikkhu(ex-husband) to be the one who chant 'anumodhana'(give blessing).

While the bhikkhu was chanting with his melodious voice, everybody could smell sweet-lotus-scent from his mouth...his sweet breath surpassed other flowers' scents like magic!! The king was so pleased with his wonderful blessing. The next day, the king went to pay homage to the Buddha and asked him why this special bhikkhu had such sweet breath. The Buddha replied that in his past life, the bhikkhu was listening to certain dhammas and he was so overwhelmed with ultimate saddha/admiration that he said "sadhu, sadhu, sadhu"...because of that true-saddha from his heart, he was reborn with sweet-breath/voice!!

NOTE: Since then the word "Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu" became a tradition!
***********

Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 2:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
The Bhikkhu Who Supported His Parents

Sawaddee Ka

This Uposatha day, please let me share the story of the bhikkhu who supported his parents...This story is very sad..I almost cry.

****************
The Bhikkhu Who Supported His Parents
[Edited from Sacredtexts.com]


Once.. there was a rich merchant at Sāvatthi who had a son who was very dear to them. One day the youth went upon the terrace of the house, and saw the great crowd going to Jetavana with perfumes and garlands in their hands. So having ordered perfumes and garlands to be brought, he went to the monastery, and having distributed dresses, medicines, drinks, etc. to the assembly and honoured the Blessed One with perfumes and garlands, he sat down on one side. After hearing the Buddha's preaching, he asked the Blessed One for ordination, but he was told to get the permission of his parents; so he went home, and lived a week without food, and having at last obtained his parents' consent, he returned to the Buddha for ordination. And after he became a bhikkhu for five years. Then he was anxious to reach the goal of mystic insight; so having obtained instruction in meditation from his teacher, he departed to a frontier village and dwelt in the forest, and there having entered a course of spiritual insight, he failed, however much he laboured and strove for twelve years, to attain any special idea.

His parents, as time went on, became poor, for those who hired their land or carried on merchandise for them, finding out that there was no son or brother in the family to enforce the payment, seized what they could lay their hands upon and ran away as they pleased, and the servants and labourers in the house seized the gold and coin and made off therewith, so at last they sold their dwelling, and finding themselves homeless, and in extreme misery, they wandered begging for alms, clothed in rags and carrying potsherds in their hands. Now at that time a Brother came from Jetavana to the son's place of abode; he performed the duties of hospitality and, as he sat quietly, he first asked whence he was come; and learning that he was come from Jetavana he asked after the health of the Teacher and the principal disciples and then asked for news of his parents, "Tell me, Sir, about the welfare of such and such a merchant's family in Sāvatthi." "O friend, don't ask for news of that family." "Why not, Sir?" "They say that the only son in that family joined the Buddha's Order, and since he left home that family has gone to ruin; and at the present time the two old people are reduced to a most lamentable state and beg for food." When he heard the bad news he began to weep with his eyes full of tears, and when the other asked him why he wept, "O Sir," he replied, "they are my own father and mother, I am their son." "O friend, thy father and mother have come to ruin through thee,—do thou go and take care of them." "For twelve years," he thought to himself, "I have laboured and striven but never been able to attain the path or the fruit: I must be incompetent; what have I to do with the ascetic life? I will become a householder and will support my parents"

So having determined he gave up his abode in the forest to the elder, and the next day departed and by successive stages reached the monastery at the back of Jetavana which is not far from Sāvatthi. There he found two roads, one leading to Jetavana, the other to Sāvatthi. As he stood there, he thought, "Shall I see my parents first or the Buddha?" Then he said to himself, "In old days I saw my parents for a long time, from henceforth I shall rarely have the chance of seeing the Buddha; I will see the perfectly Enlightened One to-day and hear the law, and then to-morrow morning I will see my parents." So he left the road to Sāvatthi and in the evening arrived at Jetavana. Now that very day at daybreak, the Master, as he looked upon the world, had seen the potentialities of this young man, and when he came to visit him he praised the virtues of parents in the Mātiposaka-sutta. As he stood at the end of the assembly of elders and listened, he thought, "If I become a householder I can support my parents; but the Master also says, "A son who has become a bhikkhu can be helpful"; I will now support my parents while still remaining a bhikkhu without becoming a householder." So he took his ticket and his ticket-food and gruel, and felt as if he had committed a sin deserving expulsion after a solitary abode of twelve years in the forest.

In the morning he went to Sāvatthi, he first got the gruel and then went to the door of their old house. When he saw his parents sitting by the opposite wall after having gone their round for the alms given in broth, he stood not far from them in a sudden burst of sorrow with his eyes full of tears. They saw him but knew him not; then his mother, thinking that it was someone standing for alms, said to him, "We have nothing fit to be given to you, be pleased to pass on." When he heard her, he repressed the grief which filled his heart and remained still standing as before with his eyes full of tears, and when he was addressed a second and a third time he still continued standing. At last the father said to the mother, "Go to him; can this be thy son?"

She rose and went to him and, recognising him, fell at his feet and lamented, and the father also joined his lamentations, and there was a loud outburst of sorrow. To see his parents he could not control himself, but burst into tears; then, after yielding to his feelings, he said, "Do not grieve, I will support you"; so having comforted them and made them drink some gruel, and sit down on one side, he went again and begged for some food and gave it to them, and then went and asked for alms for himself, and having finished his meal, took up his abode at a short distance off.

From that day forward he watched over his parents in this manner; he gave them all the alms he received for himself, and he went on separate expeditions for his own alms, and ate them; and whatever food he received as provision for the rainy season he gave to them. But the days were few when he gained alms and there were many when he failed to win anything, and his inner and outer clothing became very rough. As he watched over his parents he gradually grew very pale and thin and his friends and intimates said to him, "Your complexion used to be bright, but now you have become very pale,—has some illness come upon you?" He replied, "No illness has come upon me, but a hindrance has befallen me," and he told them the history. "Sir," they replied, "the Master does not allow us to waste the offerings of the faithful, you do an unlawful act in giving to laymen the offerings of the faithful." When he heard this he shrank ashamed.

But not satisfied with this they went and told it to the Master, saying, "So and so, Sir, has wasted the offerings of the faithful and used them to feed laymen." The Master sent for the young man of family and said to him, "Is it true that you take the offerings of the faithful and support laymen with them?" He confessed that it was true. Then the Master, wishing to praise what he had done and to declare an old action of his own, said, "When you support laymen whom do you support?" "My parents," he answered. Then the Master, wishing to encourage him still more said, "Well done, well done" three times; "You are in a path which I have traversed before you: I in old time, while going the round for alms, supported my parents." The bhikkhu was encouraged thereby. At the request of the Brethren the Master, to make known his former actions, told them a legend of the olden time..SĀMA-JĀTAKA.

**************
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Thera Kapilatta : The Magic Bridge

Sawaddee Ka :anjali:

This lovely Tuesday, I have an amazing story from Thai Tipitaka to share with you all. This story reminds me of the movie TEN COMMANDMENTS starring Charleston Heston as Moses who parted the RED SEA ..so the slaves could cross the sea to escape from the Egyptian soldiers who tried to kill/capture them.

Image

**************
Thera Kapilatta : The Magic Bridge
[Translated from Thai Tipitaka by Yawares Sastri]


One day thera Kapilatta performed miracle by making the sea-water in the ocean to be solid for all the monks to walk across. All monks were so delighted and truly respected Thera Kapilatta. They all asked the Buddha to reveal his previous life...what meritorious deeds the Thera did. And the Buddha told them this story:

In the time of Kakusandha Buddha...Kapilatta was born in a very poor family. One day he saw monks walk on the muddy road to go for alms-food. He used his hard-earn-money to build a long walkway for all the monks. Because of his kind heart/walkway good deed, just before he died he had nimitta of a beautiful silver and gold bridge come down from heaven for him to walk up. After his death, he was reborn into the Tavatimsa Deva World.

***And then during the Gautama Buddha's era, he was reborn back to earth into a very nice family. He joined the Buddha's Order and years later, he attained arahatship with Apinna 6..that was why he could make the water in the ocean turn to be be solid for monks to walk on.***
*********
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 6:54 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

My friend @ Sariputtadhamma told me that...when I wrote that my translation is better than "Bing"..sounded like I boast !!
So I would like to clear myself here @ DW...I didn't mean to boast at all....I just told the truth...please let me post .. "Bing"'s translation from Thai story here:

The Bhikkhu With Lotus-Scent Breath : The Word "Sadhu"

"Bing"'s translation

The origin of the word "listen" to agree to the Buddhist teachings from the sermon when the laeoklao monks sathukan end or ritual, or when God bless supporting laypeople would use the word "that" to salute the history: there is a short story that.

There is a man in the city of sravasti. Hear his preaching khajit regions of edification, and then see the punishment in the householder has the desire to ask for ordination to the pursuit of peace in the sense notrarom. So his ass to ordain. persevere in som notrarom as the desire has always been subsequently pasenadi. He found the woman, who is the wife of the man, and when he did know why all milestones birth to have compassion for his wife, who is in her. The woman was ordered to feed into the Palace. As a matron present day one. Ratburut presents flower green BOA nilubon. pasenadi, one of a handful. He thus bestow each party flower matron, women's ordination to the man's wife. When you get to give it to smile, as though congratulations Mrs. nilubon klon, but other Government. She is not crying tears restrain it. Pasenadi doubt God answered questions why she is smiling and crying, so she and fashioned her smile because glad deign to eat Lotus, fragrant lilies, but saw as her breath to ordain. She thought back to the guests crying pasenadi to prove her oral. So please, all decked out with a fragrance's Palace except the King nilubon BOA aratna Lord God and their priest, monks I give in already has a database of words, the woman asked how she had elements of thera claims to be her husband. The women point to the Maha thera When is phat takit. Pasenadi of the Buddha and Buddhist monks rotna and other elements back to the temple. Wenphra Maha thera, is to say to express gratitude to. When the Lord returns. Maha thera said to rejoice with a melodious voice and the water has to be diffused out of God's mouth, the aroma thera, the amazing images. Even when I lose that scent of flowers fragrant forests. Breath of Maha thera fragrant camphor smell to spread throughout the Palace and more than mixing a mango scented nilubon Lotus, Krishna. This phenomenon appeared to bump several palaces. Best King element to see the real girls to be happy that he humbly appeal to pray worship. Division of thera completed a congratulation, and then back to the Cathedral, and after enough dawn pasenadi went to Temple. Present Lord worship God Laeokrap inquired "why the mouth of King David and Goliath's aroma thera has created a charity which" Lord God, King. He said, "because the national buphop Pang. This image of monks listening to the melodious charm sattham with joy, so full of medium okwacha "to agree to". The happiness of God sattham, it has bad breath smell like this: "now all our listeners and recipients of precepts issued to ignore the word" foreign "to salute the General laze is Buddhist, and it is suggested the title" to agree to "go over to his sons and followers to be good in our culture, the original Andre back to salute", Thai language translation, "which has agreed to be one of merit in merit, there are 10 objects, manners are one of 10: topsy turvy uses an eye which consists of bun by bun part a congratulation. The following day, a good idea and well done openly "to agree to" give yourself and other people to agree to the idea. To speak with our actions in this life to make tremendous gains. It is known in the world of fragrances.

*************
Can you understand the story from 'Bing' translation??

tidathep :namaste:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 1:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 471
Suppadhitta-Deva : The Gatha Unnahissavichai

Sawaddee Ka

I really like this story...about Suppadhitta-Deva who was about to die in 7 days......

Image

Suppadhitta-Deva : The Gatha Unnahissavichai
[Translated from Thai Tipitaka by Yawares]


Once the Buddha went to Tavatimsa World to preach to his mother. There was a deva named Suppadhitta who was about to die in 7 days and he would go to hell because of his vipaka-kamma. His kind deva-friend, who used to be his kalayanamitta for many past lives, tried to persuade Suppadhitta to seek help from Sakka the king of devas. Sakka told him that nobody except the Buddha could prevent him from dying. So Suppadhitta-Deva went to pay homage to the Buddha, asking for ways to make up for his vipaka-kamma.

The Buddha told him that in one of his past existences, he was a hunter who had no mercy for animals, also abused his parents and had no respect for noble monks, if he died in 7 days he would go to hell for a long time then would be reborn as animals in many many existences. Then the Buddha preached Gatha Unnahissavichai to Suppadhitta, Sakka and all the devas, Suppadhitta truly focused on the dhamma-gatha with ultimate saddha/devotion in the Buddha...suddenly his not so shiny deva-body turned to be bright with glorious lights, which was the sign that he would not die in 7 days. The Buddha predicted that Suppadhitta Deva would be living in Tavatimsa until the time of Metteya Buddha, then he would be reborn back into the world as a rich man and joined the Metteya Buddha's Order. He would be one of the most important arahant-savaka.

*******
Love Buddhas/Dhamma :heart:
tidathep :heart:


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 190 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group