PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

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sherabzangpo
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby sherabzangpo » Sat Jun 15, 2013 7:59 am


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Huifeng
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby Huifeng » Sat Jun 15, 2013 8:16 am

Knowing Mandarin and maybe even a southern dialect or two will help a lot in reading classical Chinese in general. Chinese scholarship was well below the Japanese during much of the 20th century simply because China was almost in a perpetual state of war, and was almost unable to do anything in this area. That's now history. Chinese scholars are now in general relying less and less on Japanese scholarship, and now starting to correct mistakes that they believe the Japanese made in understanding Chinese Buddhism. This includes reading Chinese texts. In another decade or two, this will become more and more obvious. How much is seen in the Anglophonic world of scholarship is a different matter, and will be another few decades behind that. More and more young scholars of Chinese Buddhism are going directly to China, Taiwan or the like, rather than Japan, and rightly so. Knowing Mandarin will definitely be a big help in reading classical Buddhist Chinese, that is for sure. I've seen this many, many times for myself.

~~ Huifeng


Arnoud
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby Arnoud » Sat Jun 15, 2013 8:43 am

Sherab Zangpo,

I remember you from your Yahoo days. Glad to see you landed on your feet.

I disagree with you on needing colloquial skills to be a scholar or translator. Look at Malcolm. You also need to know excellent English.

As for academia, there is a whole lot more required to be a good academic than just your knowledge of Tibetan. The knowledge of Tibetan of PhD students is not that great. They will learn as they go along. Critical thinking, writing, doing research are all much more important. I say that as someone whose wife was in the best PhD program in the US and has many friends who did their PhDs there (all in Tibetan studies).
Also, if you say you are the best translator under 32 in all Asia, you will get laughed out of the room. Not because it might not be true but because it is not that important and because it looks so arrogant that most professors won't want to work with you. Of course, that attitude brought back some memories from your old Yahoo days so maybe I am not too objective.

sherabzangpo
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby sherabzangpo » Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:09 am


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Indrajala
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby Indrajala » Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:43 am

tad etat sarvajñānaṃ karuṇāmūlaṃ bodhicittahetukam upāyaparyavasānam iti |

Arnoud
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby Arnoud » Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:46 am


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Indrajala
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby Indrajala » Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:58 am

tad etat sarvajñānaṃ karuṇāmūlaṃ bodhicittahetukam upāyaparyavasānam iti |

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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby JKhedrup » Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:12 am

In terms of Sherab Zangpo's claims, for all I know they could very well be true- since I have not listened to his work I have no idea. His texts are of high quality from what I have seen (my strength is interpretation rather than written-and I still consider myself very much to be in training, but from what I do know his written work seems to be excellent).

However, there are many AMAZING translators working in India/Nepal and elsewhere in Asia. Off the top of my head I can think of Michelle Martin (translates for HH Karmapa and Gyaltsab Rinpoche among others), Ven.David Karma Chophel (HH Karmapa, Thrangu Rinpoche),Ven. Tenzin Namdak (in his 15th year of Geshe studies at Sera Je, translates for many Gelug lamas in S. Asia and Singapore), Claire Barde (Khandro-la among others), Ven. Lhundup Damcho (HH Karmapa, Tai Situ Rinpoche), Ven. Damchoe Wangmo (graduate of the nun Shedra attached to Namdroling, translates at the Palyul Centre in Nepal), Ven. Bob Miller/Losang Zopa (Khamtrul Rinpoche, Dzogchen Master) and several others. T

The above are all fantastic and I have at least some idea of the quality because I have listened to them. If Sherab la is in the same league, I can only rejoice.

As to any perceived defects in Sherab Zangpo's character, two things. Firstly, in North America (USA and to a lesser extent, Canada, where I am from) people of my generation were taught that to secure opportunities one needs to be insanely confident. So what you perceive as rude might actually just Sherab-la thinking he is being confident and explaining his situation. From living in Asia and Europe the last 9 years, I have learned the low key approach (plus I had self-confidence issues growing up).

Secondly, Sherab is under the care of some excellent teachers in Dharamsala including Geshe Lobsag Dragpa at Namgyal whom I know personally. Do not worry, they are taking excellent care of him and will guide him in character development if at all necessary, we don't need to worry. At the same time, I can see how his words could be quite off-putting.

sherabzangpo
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby sherabzangpo » Sat Jun 15, 2013 12:20 pm


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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby sherabzangpo » Sat Jun 15, 2013 12:56 pm


JKhedrup
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby JKhedrup » Sat Jun 15, 2013 3:06 pm

I want to add another dimension to the discussion on translation. The competency of the translator is extremely important.

But another thing I think is really important is the rapport between the lama teaching and the translator. If there is a connection of trust and mutual appreciation (in other words, both seek to benefit each other and the audience), I believe that the quality of the translation can be elevated. The lama will also feel whether the translator is receptive to correction or clarification (or not). If the translator seems unreceptive, they will in good faith continue even if they talk for 2 minutes and the translator talks for 5 (with lamas who have no English) or allow slight mistakes (with lamas who understand a bit of what is being translated).

Also, if you see yourself as the student of the lama you are translating for, you will be open to public correction/scolding. The teacher is sure you will not walk off or get angry (I have seen that happen), and sometimes provides guidance during the translation not just to improve the quality of the teaching but also to facilitate the spiritual benefit of the translator.

I have translated for lamas who are not my teachers before- if I feel a connection with them, I can be inspired even though it is more difficult than translating for Geshe la whom I interact with for at least an hour or two every day. If I feel no connection, however, I can sense that the audience are smart enough to pick this up and I will try to arrange for someone else to translate wherever possible.

But of course this is just my opinion, and some might argue that a truly fab translator can translate for any lama, anytime. But if there is a clean connection (and in the case of tantric teachings a good samaya) between the lama and translator, it makes a huge difference.

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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby sherabzangpo » Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:50 pm


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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby sherabzangpo » Tue Oct 08, 2013 8:26 pm

Moderators, could you please remove this thread? Thank you.

sherabzangpo
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby sherabzangpo » Wed Nov 20, 2013 11:07 pm

this is the second time i have requested, please remove this thread...

JKhedrup
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby JKhedrup » Wed Nov 20, 2013 11:49 pm

What happened?

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rory
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby rory » Thu Nov 21, 2013 4:29 am

why should the thread be removed it has very useful information that will benefit others with the same questions.
gassho
rory
Namu Kanzeon Bosatsu
Chih-I:
The Tai-ching states "the women in the realms of Mara, Sakra and Brahma all neither abandoned ( their old) bodies nor received (new) bodies. They all received buddhahood with their current bodies (genshin)" Thus these verses state that the dharma nature is like a great ocean. No right or wrong is preached (within it) Ordinary people and sages are equal, without superiority or inferiority
Paul, Groner "The Lotus Sutra in Japanese Culture"eds. Tanabe p. 58
https://www.tendai-usa.org/

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Kim O'Hara
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Re: PhD Programs in Buddhist Studies in Asia

Postby Kim O'Hara » Thu Nov 21, 2013 5:50 am



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