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Is Death a harder lesson to learn than Love? - Dhamma Wheel

Is Death a harder lesson to learn than Love?

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.
destroydesire
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Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2011 11:55 am

Is Death a harder lesson to learn than Love?

Postby destroydesire » Sat Nov 05, 2011 8:58 am

After such a long time on earth, I finally realize that the biggest lesson humanity needs to learn is not Love but Death.

Not Death as in inflicting death upon others but acceptance of Death as an inevitable reality.

If you can accept that Death will happen to you tomorrow, will you still hate others for the wrongs committed against you?

If you know that Death will happen to you the next hour, will you still possess any desires or clinging on to life?

It is very easy to practice Love but it is much much harder to practice Death.

Death of hatred, Death of your desires, Death of attachments, Death of love, Death of money and property, Death of loved ones.

Everybody welcome Love but no one welcome Death. Yet Death is the inevitable reality of nature.

Death comes for us all and it is indeed the hardest lesson to learn out of all the lessons to be learnt in this prison planet.

I understand now.

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cooran
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Location: Queensland, Australia

Re: Is Death a harder lesson to learn than Love?

Postby cooran » Sat Nov 05, 2011 9:23 am

Hello destroydesire,

Usually we try to ignore death, to put it way, way in the future. But once you realise that death can come at any moment, ready or not, then we begin to put the effort into practice.

Why we should have Spiritual Urgency (Samvega)
Samvega (spiritual urgency; chastened dispassion).

Danger #1 — death threatens from all sides: AN 5.77
Danger #2 — the conditions for practice may never again be so good: AN 5.78
Danger #3 — there may not always be good teachers around: AN 5.79
Danger #4 — the Sangha may someday decline: AN 5.80
Who knows? — tomorrow, death may come: MN 131
A call to wake up: Sn 2.10
Death is crashing in on you, like a huge mountain: SN 3.25
Three urgent duties for meditators: AN 3.91
"A Single Mind" (Fuang)
"Affirming the Truths of the Heart: The Buddhist Teachings on Samvega and Pasada" (Thanissaro)
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/index-su ... ml#samvega

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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Khalil Bodhi
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Location: NYC
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Re: Is Death a harder lesson to learn than Love?

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Sat Nov 05, 2011 10:49 am

To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

Uposatha Observance Club:
My Practice Blog:

chownah
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Joined: Wed Aug 12, 2009 2:19 pm

Re: Is Death a harder lesson to learn than Love?

Postby chownah » Sat Nov 05, 2011 1:37 pm

The lesson to be learned from both death and love is the lesson to hold to no doctrine of self whatever.......it's the same lesson for both.
chownah

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Fede
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Location: The Heart of this "Green & Pleasant Land"...
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Re: Is Death a harder lesson to learn than Love?

Postby Fede » Sat Nov 05, 2011 9:26 pm

The end of a long and fruitful love affair, when the love dies in the heart of one person, and not the other - is likened to a "live bereavement". We suffer the same kind of pain at the deprivation, as if they had died in our arms.....

So yes, Death is a harder lesson to learn than Love, because in all things, in everything, death is wide awake and ready to put 'his' hand upon your shoulder.

Good thread.
"Samsara: The human condition's heartbreaking inability to sustain contentment." Elizabeth Gilbert, 'Eat, Pray, Love'.

Simplify: 17 into 1 WILL go: Mindfulness!

Quieta movere magna merces videbatur. (Sallust, c.86-c.35 BC)
Translation: Just to stir things up seemed a good reward in itself. ;)

I am sooooo happy - How on earth could I be otherwise?! :D


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