The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

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The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Feb 23, 2013 5:31 pm

Dear Members,

I love the Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas [ http://www.dhammawiki.com/index.php?title=Bodhi_Tree ]

The Pali Canon records some biographical information of the current Buddha, along with the previous Buddhas in known history. See: 28 Buddhas. Each Buddha attained enlightenment sitting under a tree. All of the trees are considered Bodhi Trees but they were not all the same species of tree.

I promise myself that I'll try my very best to do research about these Bodhi Trees that I can find the most accurate information.

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The Gautama Buddha, Pipphali tree (Ficus Religiosa)
[From Wikipedia]


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Buddhist legend tells of Gautama Buddha attained enlightenment (bodhi) while meditating underneath the Bodhi tree, a Ficus religiosa. The site is in present day Bodh Gaya, northern India. The Bodhi tree and the Sri Maha Bodhi propagated from it are notable specimens of Sacred Fig. The known planting date of the latter, 288 BCE, gives it the oldest verified age for any flowering plant (angiosperm).[3]

In Theravada Buddhist Southeast Asia, the tree's massive trunk is often the site of Buddhist or animist shrines.

Not all Ficus religiosa can be called a 'Bodhi tree'. A 'Bodhi tree' must be able to trace its parent to another Bodhi tree and the line goes on until the first Bodhi tree under which the Lord Gautama Buddha gained enlightenment.
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Traditional medicinal uses

Ficus religiosa is used in traditional medicine for about 50 types of disorders including asthma, diabetes, diarrhea, epilepsy, gastric problems, inflammatory disorders, infectious and sexual disorders.

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Sun Feb 24, 2013 2:20 am

Dear Members....more pictures about the Bodhi Tree, BodhGaya, India.

Under the Bodhi tree
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The temple beside the Bodhi Tree
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small temple was built under the bodhi tree in Bodhgaya.
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Bodhi Tree, Bodhgaya
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:heart: Love Bodhi Tree and the Temple, BhodGaya :heart:
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby Konchog1 » Sun Feb 24, 2013 3:50 am

The exact place where the Buddha attained Enlightenment.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... f386_t.jpg
Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

-Ra Lotsawa, All-pervading Melodious Drumbeats
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby plwk » Sun Feb 24, 2013 4:35 am

Mine shall be a banana tree... :buddha1:
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Mon Feb 25, 2013 4:38 pm

Konchog1 wrote:The exact place where the Buddha attained Enlightenment.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... f386_t.jpg

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Dear Konchog1/PLWK,

Thank you for the pretty picture!

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Mon Feb 25, 2013 4:49 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, the Paduma Buddha and Narada Buddha were sitting under the beautiful Maha Sona trees when he became enlightened.

I searched yahoo for Sona Tree, India and found 2 Sona trees..Sona Chura and Sona Champa. Both trees are so very beautiful. 'Sona' means gold/golden.

Sona Chura Tree
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The streets of Dwarka, New Delhi are now bright shinning with yellow flowers of Sona chura trees lined across the streets. The bright yellow colors stay only for few day before giving way to green leaves and truly a treat for the eyes.

The streets of Dwarka, New Delhi
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Common name: Amaltas, Golden shower tree, Indian Laburnum • Hindi: अमलतास Amaltas • Manipuri: চহুঈ Chahui • Tamil: கொன்றை Konrai • Malayalam: Vishu konnai • Marathi: बहावा Bahava • Mizo: Ngaingaw • Bengali: সোনালী Sonali, Bandarlati, Amultas • Urdu: املتاس Amaltas

This native of India, is one of the most beautiful of all tropical trees when it sheds its leaves and bursts into a mass of long, grape-bunches like yellow gold flowers. A tropical ornamental tree with a trunk consisting of hard reddish wood, growing up to 40 feet tall. The wood is hard and heavy; it is used for cabinet, inlay work, etc. It has showy racemes, up to 2" long, with bright, yellow, fragrant flowers. These flowers are attractive to bees and butterflies. The fruits are dark-brown cylindrical pods, also 2' long, which also hold the flattish, brown seeds (up to 100 in one pod) These seeds are in cells, each containing a single seed. A postal stamp was issued by the Indian Postal Department to commemorate this tree.

Medicinal uses: The sweet blackish pulp of the seedpod is used as a mild laxative.

Note: Sona Chura Tree is THAILAND NATIONAL TREE...we call it "KOON TREE/GOLDEN SHOWER FLOWER"

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Sona Champa Tree, Sacred Flower of India

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Sona means gold or golden. It also means beautiful. we believe the word sona cannot be easily described - it must be experienced! In India, there is a tale about the sona champa, a delicate, golden flower that possesses an ethereal fragrance once prized by the people of India. The sona champa tree has glossy, green leaves and can grow as tall as 100 feet in a pyramidal shape. Legend has it that when the tree is in full bloom, covered with fragrant, golden blossoms, a celestial god and goddess descend to dance around it, enjoying the rare and exquisite beauty and the divine fragrance. This heavenly splendor is the true experience of the word Sona!
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Note: In Thailand we love to give Sona-Champa flowers and Jasmine flowers put together as lei/garland to the Buddha statues at our houses or at temples.

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:33 am

buddhaflower wrote:
Konchog1 wrote:The exact place where the Buddha attained Enlightenment.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... f386_t.jpg

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Dear Konchog1,

Thank you so much for the beautiful picture!
I found more pictures too:

Thai monks at Bodhi Tree, Bodh Gaya
Image

Seat of Enlightenment: The Diamond Throne, Vajrasana. :heart:
Image

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Fri Mar 01, 2013 5:09 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Padumuttara Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Salala tree (Pinus Longiflis) when he became enlightened.


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Salala Tree (Pinus Longiflis/longifolia)
[Henriette's Herbal Homepage]


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blue pine pinus longifolia
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Long-leaved, evergreen Indian Pine, native to Himalaya Mountains. The seeds are eaten in India and are of some importance as food in times of scarcity.

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:heart: My first time to see 'blue pine' :heart:
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby JKhedrup » Fri Mar 01, 2013 8:05 pm

Beautiful photos. But those aren´t Thai monks. I would recognize those Chogus anywhere-they are Tibetan monks, wearing the yellow "precept shawl" that is divided into strips according to tradition.
A foolish man proclaims his qualifications,
A wise man keeps them secret within.
A straw floats on the surface of water,
But a precious gem placed upon it sinks to the depths
-Sakya Pandita
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby Konchog1 » Fri Mar 01, 2013 9:19 pm

JKhedrup wrote:Beautiful photos. But those aren´t Thai monks. I would recognize those Chogus anywhere-they are Tibetan monks, wearing the yellow "precept shawl" that is divided into strips according to tradition.
Off topic, but why do some Tibetan Buddhist monks wear all red, some wear red with yellow chest panels, and some wear a yellow cloak? Thank you.
Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

-Ra Lotsawa, All-pervading Melodious Drumbeats
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:42 am

JKhedrup wrote:Beautiful photos. But those aren´t Thai monks. I would recognize those Chogus anywhere-they are Tibetan monks, wearing the yellow "precept shawl" that is divided into strips according to tradition.


Dear JKhedrup,

Oh..you're right...When I look closely I can see that the dark-red color things are not the monks' purses ...my bad..my bad!! In Thailand some monks wear purses to put things that they need.

Unfortunately, I can't edit anything....please forgive me...I'll be more careful from now on.

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Mon Mar 04, 2013 4:18 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Phussa Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Amalaka tree (Phyllanthus Emblica) when he became enlightened.

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Amalaka tree (Phyllanthus Emblica)
[From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]

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also known as indian gooseberry juice amalaka juice
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Phyllanthus emblica (syn. Emblica officinalis), the Indian gooseberry, or aamla from Sanskrit amalika, is a deciduous tree of the family Phyllanthaceae. It is known for its edible fruit of the same name.

The tree is small to medium in size, reaching 8 to 18 m in height, with a crooked trunk and spreading branches. The branchlets are glabrous or finely pubescent, 10–20 cm long, usually deciduous; the leaves are simple, subsessile and closely set along branchlets, light green, resembling pinnate leaves. The flowers are greenish-yellow. The fruit is nearly spherical, light greenish yellow, quite smooth and hard on appearance, with six vertical stripes or furrows.

Ripening in autumn, the berries are harvested by hand after climbing to upper branches bearing the fruits. The taste of Indian gooseberry is sour, bitter and astringent, and it is quite fibrous. In India, it is common to eat gooseberries steeped in salt water and turmeric to make the sour fruits palatable[citation needed]. It is also used to straighten hair.

Cultural and religious significance

In the Sanskrit Buddhist tradition half an amalaka fruit was the final gift to the Buddhist sangha by the great Indian emperor Asoka. This is illustrated in the Asokavadana in the following verses: "A great donor, the lord of men, the eminent Maurya Asoka, has gone from being lord of Jambudvipa [India] to being lord of half a myrobalan." (Strong, 1983, P.99)[16] This deed became so famous that a stupa was created to mark place of the event in modern day Patna and was known as the Amalaka stupa.

The tree is considered sacred by Hindus as the god Vishnu is believed to dwell here. The tree is worshipped on Amalaka Ekadashi.

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[edit] Medicinal use

In traditional Indian medicine, dried and fresh fruits of the plant are used. All parts of the plant are used in various Ayurvedic/Unani medicine (Jawarish amla) herbal preparations, including the fruit, seed, leaves, root, bark and flowers.[17] According to Ayurveda, aamla fruit is sour (amla) and astringent (kashaya) in taste (rasa), with sweet (madhura), bitter (tikta) and pungent (katu) secondary tastes (anurasas).[17] Its qualities (gunas) are light (laghu) and dry (ruksha), the postdigestive effect (vipaka) is sweet (madhura), and its energy (virya) is cooling (shita).[12]

According to Ayurveda, aamla balances all three doshas. While aamla is unusual in that it contains five out of the six tastes recognized by Ayurved, it is most important to recognize the effects of the "virya", or potency, and "vipaka", or post-digestive effect. Considered in this light, aamla is particularly helpful in reducing pitta due to its cooling energy.[17] and balances both Pitta and vata by virtue of its sweet taste. The kapha is balanced primarily due to its drying action. It may be used as a rasayana (rejuvenative) to promote longevity, and traditionally to enhance digestion (dipanapachana), treat constipation (anuloma), reduce fever (jvaraghna), purify the blood (raktaprasadana), reduce cough (kasahara), alleviate asthma (svasahara), strengthen the heart (hrdaya), benefit the eyes (chakshushya), stimulate hair growth (romasanjana), enliven the body (jivaniya), and enhance intellect (medhya).[17]
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Culinary use

Particularly in South India, the fruit is pickled with salt, oil, and spices. Aamla is eaten raw or cooked into various dishes. In Andhra Pradesh, tender varieties are used to prepare dal (a lentil preparation), and amle ka murabbah, a sweet dish indigenous to the northern part of India (wherein the berries are soaked in sugar syrup for a long time till they are imparted the sweet flavor); it is traditionally consumed after meals.

Note: These fruit pickled are quite popular in Thailand, I loved loved to eat them when I was in Thailand...so yummy. May be that's why I'm so strong/healthy.
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[edit] Other uses

Popularly used in inks, shampoos and hair oils, the high tannin content of Indian gooseberry fruit serves as a mordant for fixing dyes in fabrics.[17] Amla shampoos and hair oil are traditionally believed to nourish the hair and scalp and prevent premature grey hair

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby JKhedrup » Mon Mar 04, 2013 6:20 pm

You didn't offend me at all, it was just something I noticed- no need to apologize!


Off topic, but why do some Tibetan Buddhist monks wear all red, some wear red with yellow chest panels, and some wear a yellow cloak? Thank you.


When you say cloak do you mean the donkha? (the sort of Vest that is worn by Tibetan monks)

At the monastery where I ordained and most of my teachers are from, the monks wear a solid red dongkha until their Geshe degree, and then usually wear yellow panels (some graduates of Gyuto prefer to continue wearing a solid red dongkha). This is generally the rule at the '''Big Three'' Gelug monasteries- Sera, Drepung and Ganden. Some incarnate tulkus wear a dongkha with yellow chest panels, but other than that it is the sign of having completed the Geshe degree.

At Gyumey tantric college, all the monks wear the dongkha with yellow panels. At Gyuto tantric college, all the monks wear solid red dongkhas. Namgyal Monastery (personal monastery of HHDL) monks all wear the yellow panelled ones, as do the monks at Kopan (FPMT in Kathmandu) and Dzongkhar Choede.

The dongkha, or vest, as far as I know was developed by Lama Tzongkhapa, so in the other orders it does not seem that the monasteries require their monks to wear it, except for maybe certain ceremonies. I know that many of the monks at Namdroling, Penor Rinpoche's monastery near Sera, wear a simple button-up blouse (ngulen) under their Zen (red shawl).

In terms of the cloak, there are several types. The heavy winter one (usually red) is called a dagam and worn to protect from the cold, but also for certain ceremonies even in the Indian heat. As far as I know, it is not a Vinaya garment. There is a yellow Chogu, a Vinaya garment that is connected with the novice/sramanera/getsul ordination, that is also worn by fully ordained monks during special occasions ie teachings and rituals. The yellow namjar is a Vinaya garment that is worn by people holding the full (bhilshu/ni) ordination. It is made of many strips and usually only worn during monastic confession ceremonies and Vinaya related procedures like Gaye (release from the rains retreat).

The red shawl (zen) that you see me wearing in the avatar, is actually our everyday wear. It is a plain piece of red cloth, and technically not a Vinaya garment. Historically I believe it developed because of the harsh terrain in Tibet and lack of cleaning facilities, where the yellow Chogu would easily become dirty and damaged. The Zen is red so it doesn't stain as easily, and not in panel-strips, so it is easier to clean.

Our Shamtab (monk's skirt) is also a Vinaya garment. Those who wear a shamtab divided into separate square sections are fully ordained, those with a solid shamthab are novices.
A foolish man proclaims his qualifications,
A wise man keeps them secret within.
A straw floats on the surface of water,
But a precious gem placed upon it sinks to the depths
-Sakya Pandita
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Mar 09, 2013 4:35 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Sumedha Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Maha Nipa tree when he became enlightened.

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Maha-Nipa tree (Nauclea Cadamba)
[From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]

Synonyms: Neolamarckia cadamba

Cadamba Flower
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Cadamba fruits/flowers/leaves
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Tree in Kolkata, West Bengal, India
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Nauclea cadamba, commonly called Kadam (Kannada: ಕದಂಬ), (Bengali: কদম/কদম্ব),(Oriya: କଦମ୍ବ) (Tamil: கடம்பு) is an evergreen, tropical tree native to South and Southeast Asia. The genus name "Lamarckia" is derived from the name of French naturalist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck.

A fully mature Kadam tree can reach up to 45m in height. It is a large tree with a broad crown and straight cylindrical bole. It is quick growing, with broad spreading branches and grows rapidly in the first 6-8 years. The trunk has a diameter of 100-160 cm, but typically less than that. Leaves are 13-32 cm long. Flowering usually begins when the tree is 4–5 years old. Kadam flowers are sweetly fragrant, red to orange in colour, occurring in dense, globular heads of approximately 5.5 cm diameter. The fruit of N. cadamba occur in small, fleshy capsules packed closely together to form a fleshy yellow-orange infructescence containing approximately 8000 seeds. On maturing, the fruit splits apart, releasing the seeds, which are then dispersed by wind or rain.

Native to the following areas:

Indian subcontinent: India (n. & w.); Bangladesh; Nepal; Sri Lanka
Southeast Asia: Cambodia; Laos; Myanmar; Thailand; Vietnam, Indonesia; Malaysia; Papua New Guinea
Southern China

[edit] Uses

The fruit and inflorescences are reportedly edible to humans. The fresh leaves are fed to cattle. The fragrant orange flowers attract pollinators. Its sapwood is white with a light yellow tinge becoming creamy yellow on exposure and is not clearly differentiated from the heartwood.

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Kadamba is stated to be one of the most frequently planted trees in the tropics. A yellow dye is obtained from the root bark. Kadamba flowers are an important raw material in the production of ‘attar’, which is Indian perfume with sandalwood (Santalum spp.) base in which one of the essences is absorbed through hydro-distillation. The flowers exhibit slight anti-implantation activity in test animals. Kadamba extracts exhibit nematicidal effects on Meloidogyne incognita. The dried bark is used to relieve fever and as a tonic. An extract of the leaves serves as a mouth gargle.

The tree is grown along avenues, roadsides and villages for shade. Kadamba are suitable for reforestation programs. It sheds large amounts of leaf and non-leaf litter which on decomposition improves some physical and chemical properties of soil under its canopy. This reflects an increase in the level of soil organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, available plant nutrients and exchangeable bases.

Kadamba tree leaves are also used for treating diabetes. A drug made from this tree is patented.

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[edit] Cultural significance

Kadamba tree at the entrance to the Meenakshi temple
The word Kadamba lends its name to the Kadamba Dynasty which ruled from Banavasi in what is now the state of Karnataka from 345 CE to 525 CE, as per Talagunda inscription of c.450 CE.The Kadamba tree was considered a holy tree by the Kadamba dynasty.

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[edit] Religious significance

Karam-Kadamba is a popular harvest festival, celebrated on the eleventh Moon day of the month Bhaadra. A twig of the tree is brought and worshipped in the courtyard of the house. Later in the day, young ears of grain are distributed among friends and relatives. This festive custom has been adopted by Tulu people. Onam (Kerala) and Huttari (Kodagu) are regional variants of this festival. Kadambotsava ("The festival of Kadamba") is also the festival that is celebrated every year by the Government of Karnataka in honor of the Kadamba kingdom, the first ruling Kingdom of Karnataka, at Banavasi, as it was here that the Kadamba kings organised the spring festival every year.

The Kadamba tree is also associated with a tree deity called Kadambariyamman. The Kadamba tree, which is considered the ‘sthalavruksham’ (Tree of the place) of the city that is otherwise known as ‘Kadambavanam’ (Kadamba forest) and is present in Meenakshi Temple. A withered relic of the Kadamba tree is also preserved there.

It claimed that the 27 Stars (constellations) constituting 12 Houses (Rasis) and 9 Planets are specifically represented precisely by 27 trees —one for each star. The Kadamba tree is said to represent Shatabhisha (Western star name -γ Aquarii).

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Wed Mar 13, 2013 2:49 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Sujata Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Maha-Velu Tree (Bambusa Arundinacea) when he became enlightened.

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:heart: Maha-Velu Tree (Bambusa Arundinacea) :heart:
[From Wikipedia/Exoticplant/Motherherbs]

Bambusa flowers
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This is a true giant, growing up to 40 m high. They have numerous branches at a node and one or two much larger than the rest. It has many stems tufted on a stout root stock. New shoots start growing slowly, but soon grow approximately 30 cm per day. 75 cm in one day has been recorded in Sri Lanka.

Bambusa arundinacea, also known as spiny, thorny or Indian bamboo, is thorny and densely tufted with curving branches and shining stalks that reach up to 30m tall and 18cm wide. It is native to the forests of India, Thailand and southern China, though it is also planted in Indonesia, Nepal, the Philippines and Vietnam. Spiny bamboo thrives in moderately to very humid tropical climates and will grow on rich or poor soils, though it prefers an acidic, moist environment. This type of bamboo is commonly used for building materials, furniture, pulp and paper.

The bamboo shoot in its fermented state forms an important ingredient in cuisines across the Himalayas. In Assam, India, for example, it is called khorisa. In Nepal, a delicacy popular across ethnic boundaries consists of bamboo shoots fermented with turmeric and oil, and cooked with potatoes into a dish that usually accompanies rice (alu tama in Nepali).

In Ayurveda, the Indian system of traditional medicine, the silicious concretion found in the culms of the bamboo stem is called banslochan. It is known as tabashir or tawashir in unani-tibb the Indo-Persian system of medicine. In English, it is called "bamboo manna". This concretion is said to be a tonic for the respiratory diseases.[citation needed] It was earlier obtained from Melocanna bambusoides and is very hard to get. In most Indian literature, Bambusa arundinacea is described as the source of bamboo manna.

Bamboo has strong influence on spinal complains and hormonal disorders. We expect bamboo to be one of the major "women's remedies". The bamboo shoot is itself a "plant embryo" and this is a powerful signature that suggests the use of bamboo in childbirth and the time after.

Bambusa Arundinacea Extract
Action :
Silicates: 1. It functions as a cross-linking agent, providing strength, flexibility and resilience to collagen and elastin connective tissues. 2. It is plays a part in the integrity of the bones, arterial walls, skin, teeth, gums, hair and nails and has been used to alleviate eczema and psoriasis. 3. It may be useful in preventing osteoporosis and in strengthening the musculoskeletal system, preventing injuries and speeding the healing of fractures. 4. It stimulates chrondroblast or cartilage-forming cells to deposit proteins and other structural materials on the matrix. 5. It helps in the building process of fiber-forming cells important to the creation of collagen. 6. It is very useful in creation of the body’s structural matrix for forming and repairing connective tissue.

Curing Diseases : 1. It is used in diarrhoea, dyspepsia, flatulence and worm problems.
2. It is used in fever, inflammations, ulcers and wounds.
3. It is also used in vomiting, hyperdipsia and burning sensation.
4. It helps to cure cough, bronchitis, asthma, asthmatic bronchitis and emphysema.
5. It is used in strangury, syphilis, ophthalmia and haemorrhages.

Research Information : Extract of Bambusa arundinacea leaves shows significant anti-inflammatory as well as antiulcer effect against carrageenin-induced as well as immunologically induced paw oedema. It is very useful in long-term chronic inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis along with peptic ulcers. (Ref. Muniappan, M and Sundararaj, T, Antiinflammatory and antiulcer activities of Bambusa arundinacea. J. Ethanopharmacology, 2003 Oct;88 (2-3): 161-167)

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:47 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Atthadassi Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Maha-Campaka Tree (Michelia Champaka) when he became enlightened.

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Campaka tree (Michelia Champaka)
Synonym = Magnolia champaca
[From Wikipedia/World English Dictionary]

Magnolia champaca is a large evergreen tree, native to India and the East Indies, the Indomalaya ecozone (consisting of South Asia, Southeast Asia and some parts of China). It is best known for its strongly fragrant yellow or white flowers. It is, however, primarily cultivated for its timber, and is also used in urban landscaping. Its aril-covered seeds are highly attractive to birds.

Michelia Champaca (Himalayan Magnolia) Used in perfumes
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Varieties

This species occurs in varying shades of cream to yellow-orange. In China, M. champaca var. pubinervia is documented. Magnolia × alba is a hybrid cultivar of M. champaca. In Thailand, there has been some purported man-made hybrids with other magnolia species including Magnolia liliifera and Magnolia coco.

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Etymology

The species epithet, champaca, comes from the Sanskrit word campaka (pronounced tʃaɱpaka). Common names in other languages include champaca, champak; Sonchaaphaa (सोन चाफ़ा) in the Marathi language; Chenbakam/Chenpakam (செண்பகம்) in Tamil; Chenbagam in Malayalam; shornochampa (golden champa), স্বর্ণচাঁপা in Bengali; champa, cempaka, sampenga and sampangi in Telugu; Sampige (ಸಂಪಿಗೆ) in Kannada;

Perfume

The flowers are used in Southeast Asia for several purposes. They are primarily used for worship at temples whether at home or out, and more generally worn in hair by girls and women as a means of beauty ornament as well as a natural perfume. Flowers are used to be floated in bowls of water to scent the room, as a fragrant decoration for bridal beds, and for garlands.

"Magnolia champaca however is more rare and has a strong perfume, and is not that commonly or plentifully used - for example in hair it is worn singly or as a small corsage but rarely as a whole garland, and for bridal beds it is most often jasmine and roses while for bowls of water to be placed around rooms usually other, more colourful for visual decoration and less strongly perfumed flowers are used."

The flower is sometimes commonly called the 'Joy perfume tree.' Many niche perfumers are now once again using Champaca Absolute as single note fragrances, notably Ormonde Jayne Perfumery launched in 2002 Champaca, Tom Ford Champaca Absolute and Comme des Garcons.
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NOTE: I think golden Campaka Tree and Sona Champa tree are the same ...same tree/same flower

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:heart: I had a big creamy-white Campaka tree( 'Jumpee' in Thai) at my house in Bangkok :jumping:
yawares/sirikanya :heart:
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Mon Mar 25, 2013 5:25 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Sikhi Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Pundarika tree (Mangifera indica ) when he became enlightened.

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:heart: Sikhi Buddha:Pundarika Tree :heart:
[Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]


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Mangifera indica is a species of mango in the Anacardiaceae family. It is found in the wild in India and cultivated varieties have been introduced to other warm regions of the world. It is the largest fruit-tree in the world, capable of a height of one-hundred feet and an average circumference of twelve to fourteen feet, sometimes reaching twenty.

The species appears to have been domesticated about 4,000 years ago.[citation needed] The species was brought to East Asia around 400-500 BCE from India; next, in the 15th century to the Philippines; and then, in the 16th century to Africa and Brazil by the Portuguese. The species was described for science by Linnaeus in 1753.

Mango is the national fruit of India, Philippines and Pakistan. It finds mention in the songs of 4th century CE Sanskrit poet, Kalidasa, prior to it is believed to have been tasted by Alexander (3rd century BCE) and Chinese pilgrim, Hieun Tsang (7th century CE). Later in 16th century Mughal Emperor, Akbar planted 100,000 mango trees in Darbhanga, Bihar at a place now known as Lakhi Bagh.

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I love love Mango tree, beautiful plant with very sweet fruits..if I/Tep/Sirikanya chose to be ascetics, we would build pretty hermitage under a huge mango tree near a lake with a small Viking ship..Oh daydream again :heart:
yawares/tidathep :anjali:
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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Mon Apr 01, 2013 2:43 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Vessabhu Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Maha-sala tree (Shorea Robusta)when he became enlightened.

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Vessabhu: Maha-sala tree (Shorea Robusta)
[Wikipedia]


Shorea robusta, also known as śāl or shala tree, is a species of tree belonging to the Dipterocarpaceae family.

New leaves with flower buds
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This tree is native to the Indian Subcontinent, ranging south of the Himalaya, from Myanmar in the east to Nepal, India and Bangladesh. In India, it extends from Assam, Bengal, Odisha and Jharkhand west to the Shivalik Hills in Haryana, east of the Yamuna. The range also extends through the Eastern Ghats and to the eastern Vindhya and Satpura ranges of central India. It is often the dominant tree in the forests where it occurs. In Nepal, it is found mostly in the terai region from east to west, especially, in the Churia range (the Shivalik Hill Churia Range) in the subtropical climate zone. There are many protected areas, such as Chitwan National Park, Bardiya National Park Bardia National Park, Shukla Phat National Parks, etc., where there are dense forests of huge sal trees. It is also found in the lower belt of the hilly region and inner terai.

SAl tree is also known as Sakhua in the northern India including MP, Orrisa and Jharkhand.

Sal is moderate to slow growing, and can attain heights of 30 to 35 m and a trunk diameter of up to 2-2.5 m. The leaves are 10–25 cm long and 5–15 cm broad. In wetter areas, it is evergreen; in drier areas, it is dry-season deciduous, shedding most of the leaves in between February to April, leafing out again in April and May.

Uses

Sal is one of the most important sources of hardwood timber in India, with hard, coarse-grained wood that is light in colour when freshly cut, but becomes dark brown with exposure. The wood is resinous and durable, and is sought-after for construction, although not well suited to planing and polishing. The wood is specially suitable for constructing frames for doors and windows. The dry leaves of sal are a major source for the production of leaf plates and leaf bowls in northern and eastern India. The leaves are also used fresh to serve ready made paan (betelnut preparations) and small snacks such as boiled black grams, gol gappa, etc. The used leaves/plates are readily eaten by goats and cattle that roam the streets freely. The tree has therefore protected northern India from a flood of styrofoam and plastic plates that would have caused tremendous pollution. In South India, fresh plantain and banana leaves are used instead.

Sal tree resin, ṛla in Sanskrit, is used as an astringent in Ayurvedic medicine.[6] It is also burned as incense in Hindu ceremonies, and sal seeds and fruit are a source of lamp oil and vegetable fat.

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:05 pm

Dear Members,

:heart: Vipassi Buddha :heart:

In the Pali tradition Vipassi Buddha is identified as the nineteenth of the twenty-four Buddhas. Born of the father Bandhuma and mother Bandhumati in the Khema Park at a place called Bandhumati he belonged to the Kondanna clan (gotta). He was married to Sutana and had a son Samavattakkhandha.

He renounced the worldly life on chariot; and practised austerities for eight months. Then he sat on the foot of the patali tree; and just before his Enlightenment he accepted the milk-rice from Daughter-of-Sudassana-Setthi; and sat on the seat prepared for him by Sujat. He delivered his first sermon at Khemamigadaya to his step-brother Khandha and his priest’s son – Tissa. His chief attendant was Asoka. Chanda and Chandamitta were his chief women disciples. Punabbasummitta and Naga were his principal male patrons; and Sirima and Uttara were the chief women patrons. He died at the age of eighty thousand.

During the Age of Vipassi Buddha the present Bodhisatta lived as a Naga king with the name Atula; and had the privilege of having offered a golden seat embossed with jewels to Vipassi Buddha.

[See Buddhavamsa Atthakatha; Digha Nikaya ii.2ff; Dhammapada Atthakatha iii.236.]
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Patali tree (Bigonia Suaveolens)
[http://www.flickr.com/photos/dinesh_valke/7260558208/]


Patali (Sanskrit: पाटलि)
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commonly known as: yellow snake tree • Assamese: dhapatita, পৰ্ৰোলী parroli • Bengali: পারুল parul • Gujarati: પાડેલી padeli • Hindi: पारल paral, पारोली paroli, पाटल patal • Kannada: ಕಲಾದ್ರಿ kalaadri, ಪಾದರಿ paadari • Konkani: पाडल paadal • Malayalam: കരിങ്ങഴ karingazha, പാതിരി paathiri, പൂപ്പാതിരി puuppaathiri • Manipuri: মিস্সী missi • Marathi: पाडळ padal, पाडळी padali • Mizoram: zinghal • Oriya: pamphunia • Sanskrit: पाटल patal, पाटला patala, पाटलि patali • Tamil: அம்பு ampu, அம்புவாகினி ampuvakini, பாடலம் patalam, பாதிரி patiri, புன்காலி punkali • Telugu: అంబువాసిని ambuvasini, కలిగొట్టు kaligottu, పాదిరి padiri, పాటల patala • Urdu: پارل paral, پاٿل patal

Native to: Throughout India, growing in deciduous forests, Indian subcontinent, Indo-China, South China.

Yellow Snake Tree is a deciduous tree, growing to 15-20 m tall, with the trunk 15-25 cm in diameter. Large pinnate leaves are 25-50 cm long. Elliptic leaflets, 3-6 on each side of midrib, are 8-14 X 2.5-6 cm. Flowers are pale yellow, with reddish-purple veins, slightly curved, about 2 cm long. Upper lip is 2-lobed, and the lower one 3-lobed, velvety at the mouth. The fruit is long, 4-angular, curved, 30-70 cm, about 1 cm in diameter, brown, covered with white specks. The Padiri (Tamil name) tree is associated with the Padaleeshwarar temple at Tiruppathiripuliyur, Tamil Nadu. It is believed that Goddess Uma reached Tiruppathiripuliyur after worship of 1008 Shiva sthalams. She worshipped Lord Padaleeshwarar installed under a Padiri tree. After years of penance, Lord Shiva appeared and he united with the Goddess under the sacred Padiri tree, which is now the sthalavriksha of the temple.The tree is associated with the Ekapatala, sister of Goddess Uma who took only one Patala leaf for food. Flowering: May-July.

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MEDICINAL PROPERTIES
Plant pacifies vitiated vata, pitta skin diseases, urinary retention, kidney stones, arthritis, cough, hemorrhoids, and muscular pain.
Useful part : Root, Leaves, Flowers, Fruits, Seeds

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Re: The Bodhi Trees of the 28 Buddhas

Postby buddhaflower » Sat Apr 13, 2013 2:46 pm

Dear Members,

According to The Dhamma Encyclopedia, Kakusandha Buddha was sitting under the beautiful Sirisa tree (Acacia Sirissa) when he became enlightened.

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:heart: Kakusandha :Sirisa tree (Acacia Sirissa) :heart:
[flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Siris%20Tree.html - Cached]


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Common name: Siris tree, Woman's tongue, Saras सरस (Hindi), Khok (Manipuri), சிரிடம் Siridam (Tamil), Vaga (Malayalam), Tinia (Urdu)
Botanical name: Albizia lebbeck Family: Mimosaceae (Touch-me-not family)

Medium to large tree with gray-brown bark; leaves bipinnate, the primary leaflets subopposite, 2-4 pairs; ultimate leaflets opposite, 6-8 pairs, oblong, slightly asymmetric, blunt, 2.5-4.5 cm long. Flowers mimosa-like, in showy, rounded clusters near stem tips, 5-6 cm (2-2.5 in) across, cream or yellowish-white, each flower with numerous long stamens. Fruit a flat, linear pod, to 30 cm (1 ft) long, with many seeds; dried pods persistent after leaf-fall, often heard rattling in the wind.

Family: Mimosoideae / Mimosaceae
Womans tongue, Siris-tree, Rain tree, East Indian walnut, Kokko, Soros-tree, Raom tree
Origin: India, Burma and the Andaman Island

Sirisa tree (Acacia Sirissa) is a fast-growing tree, that is susceptible to wind damage. A moderate to large, deciduous tree can grow up to 100 feet high in rain forests. The tree develops a straight trunk when it is grown in dense forests, but is spreading and low branching in the open. Unless trimmed frequently,the trees will annually produce an abundance of seed from papery pods about 8" long and 1" wide. Common names such as "woman's tongue" and "rattle pod" derive from the noise of pods shaking in the wind. The foliage is pale green when young and gray-green at maturity. Flowers are cream colored, hemispheric pom-poms. The tree is used as a folk remedy for many ailments. Another common use is as an avenue tree, and sometimes it is used to shade coffee and tea. Saponins and tannins in the bark can be used for making soap and in tanning, respectively. Bee keepers like the species for the light-colored honey its nectar provides, and the tree hosts the lac insect.

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My univ.(Chulalongkorn)..there are many huge trees that look pretty much like Sirisa tree..but pink flowers..Thai name " Jam-ju-ree"

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Jam-ju-ree became our Univ. symbol..a famous singer 'Suntharaporn' wrote a song..Univ. plays this song at every graduation day.
I had tears in my eyes when they played the song on my graduation day..may be happy tears that I graduated..ready to work..made my own money.

Buddhaflower :heart: :anjali:
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