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munindra's way - Dhamma Wheel

munindra's way

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
befriend
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munindra's way

Postby befriend » Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:54 pm

hey guys,
i think laughter and childlike wonderous enjoyment is a VITAL part of the path. for example take the teacher Munindra who has passed, he was a theravadan teacher who made himself laugh all the time, looking at animals was a moving unforgettable experience. to me this is dhamma. when i am waiting in the grocery store line, i stop and i look at the display case of cookies and its entrancing and i am aware of there shiny plastic covering and this reminds me that i am alive. its not really what i am looking at but i am looking so presently its the ACT of looking that is enjoyable, and this makes me incredibly happy. and to know i can do this all day long is a miracle. my passion in life is brushing my teeth and doing the dishes. because of the experience of how my gums feel etc.. this is how munindra lived his life, curious like a cat, playful as a child, and virtuous as a monk. i wake up and im already have so much happpiness in my mind i cant help but think this approach AS well as meditation is the path. thoughts? experiences? metta befriend. someone asked munindra why he meditated. he didnt say so i can radiated wisdom into the 10 realms, or free myself from the passion. he said so i can see the leaves more clearly. i do not mean to diminish the efficacy of insight or metta, i mean they are just as important possibly more important than what i am speaking of but i think this is an important teaching.
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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cooran
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Re: munindra's way

Postby cooran » Wed Oct 12, 2011 7:24 pm

Hello befriend,

Could you link us to where he talks about this?

My understanding is that Anagarika Munindra was a Vipassana practitioner who much valued the teachings of Mahasi Sayadaw and Sayagi U Ba Khin. In his later years he started staying with Sri S.N. Goenka at VRI's main meditation centre at Igatpuri, India. Most of his time was spent practising Vipassana there in his room / cell in pagoda.

Additionally, this might be of interest - Living This Life Fully: Stories and Teachings of Munindra - A Tricycle Book Club Discussion with Mirka Knaster
http://www.tricycle.com/community/livin ... s-munindra

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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Re: munindra's way

Postby befriend » Wed Oct 12, 2011 7:55 pm

yea yea, i just finished reading munindras life and teachings, from shambhala books boston. its like 9 bucks on kindle. i didnt say he didnt practice vipassana, im saying he was not like a lot of other dhamma teachers at the time whom were serious. metta befriend
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

befriend
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Re: munindra's way

Postby befriend » Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:00 pm

what do you mean? do you disagree with my thoughts on munindra? metta, befriend
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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cooran
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Re: munindra's way

Postby cooran » Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:06 pm

Hello befriend,

Not doubting you at all - just wanted a link or some actual quotes from Munindra-ji re the 'wondrous childlike enjoyment'.

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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tiltbillings
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Re: munindra's way

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:51 pm


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Re: munindra's way

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:20 pm

I would strongly recommend this book about Munindra Living This Life Fully: Stories and Teachings of Munindra by Mirka Knaster, and this book about one of his students:

Dipa Ma: The Life and Legacy of a Buddhist Master by Amy Schmidt. It is very likely these two were ariya.

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mikenz66
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Re: munindra's way

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:29 pm


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Re: munindra's way

Postby befriend » Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:54 pm

nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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Re: munindra's way

Postby befriend » Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:55 pm

does anyone else live there life like this? meaning any fellow buddhists on this forum? doesnt looking at leaves bring joy into your heart/mind?
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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mikenz66
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Re: munindra's way

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:42 pm


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Re: munindra's way

Postby befriend » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:46 pm

munindra seems playful next to a child on a playground.
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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Ben
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Re: munindra's way

Postby Ben » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:58 pm

“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

(Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • •

e: [email protected]..

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Re: munindra's way

Postby befriend » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:04 pm

i didnt say enjoying life is nibbana. but some say samsara is nibbana. i dont know though. buddha said there is nirvanic bliss in seeing things as they are.
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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Ben
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Re: munindra's way

Postby Ben » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:19 pm

“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

(Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • •

e: [email protected]..

befriend
Posts: 1075
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 11:39 am

Re: munindra's way

Postby befriend » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:31 pm

i think its a neat idea, worthy of reflection. did not buddha attain nibbana in this life. when he looked at the world he must have seen nibanna, because he saw the world without delusion. in zen they say meditation is enlightenment, which gets complicated but there might be a nugget of wisdom in that pithy saying. hmm. fascinating.
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

chownah
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Re: munindra's way

Postby chownah » Thu Oct 13, 2011 3:11 am

From the article in the link that tiltbillings provided:
"Munindra was simply a flourishing human being, not a saint. With all his idiosyncrasies and fallibility, he walked the path and enabled others to walk it too. "
To get a better picture of Munindra it seems like we should find out about the "idiosyncrasies and fallibility" too......if we develop the view that his characteristic of being playful will help in reaching the goal then maybe we should develop the view that his fallibility will help in reacing the goal too?....probably not.....then could it be that we are just choosing things we like and using Munindra as an excuse for pursuing them?.....I don't know.....
chownah

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tiltbillings
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Re: munindra's way

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Oct 13, 2011 3:26 am


dhamma follower
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Re: munindra's way

Postby dhamma follower » Thu Oct 13, 2011 11:59 am


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Re: munindra's way

Postby befriend » Thu Oct 13, 2011 12:07 pm

i didnt say that at all. im just saying being playful is helpful for the path, and ive never heard anyone talk about it till i read about munindra. im not saying one should reject other buddhist practices and pretend a cardboard box is a spaceship. i didnt say that IS the path. metta, befriend
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life


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