Dharma Wheel

A Buddhist discussion forum on Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism
It is currently Tue Dec 23, 2014 12:39 am

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2012 8:05 pm
Posts: 5
Hello

Has anyone here ever renewed their precepts. I took mine originally some time ago (not particularly seriously) and have never deliberately broken them, but I would like to Renew them.

But I want to understand what it means to renew your precepts (but from a Buddhist point of view) - because I want to basically have a fresh start with my precepts.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:48 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 7:18 pm
Posts: 6
Location: Austria
As far as I know you can only renew them (ritually) in front of a teacher. But if you haven`t broken them there is no need to renew them. Its different with the bodhisattva vow. This one you can renew yourself every day having taken it once in front of a teacher. But in my opinion the best renewal is to bring them to your mind every day and to decide to live in accord with them.

_________________
Yours in the Dharma


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:21 pm 
Offline
Global Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 8:25 am
Posts: 1467
Location: Europe
About the precepts i don't know it exactly but to renew my Bodhisattva-vows by myself is my habit from time to time.

In our tradition (Gelug) it is possible to renew them whenever you like. Most propably even every day, as soon as you have taken them from a lama.
The ritual is to clean the altar place. Put offerings, do some prostrations, offer the Seven Limb Prayer and than say the Bodhisattva-vows three times. At the end there is always the dedication.

I hope this text might be helpful:

http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/ar ... hitta.html

_________________
Metta, Karuna, Mudita, Upekha
*** om vajra krodha hayagrīva hulu hulu hūm phat**


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 3:44 pm 
Online

Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 3:38 am
Posts: 556
Cloudy wrote:
Hello

Has anyone here ever renewed their precepts. I took mine originally some time ago (not particularly seriously) and have never deliberately broken them, but I would like to Renew them.

But I want to understand what it means to renew your precepts (but from a Buddhist point of view) - because I want to basically have a fresh start with my precepts.


What is the significance of renewing them?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 6:38 pm 
Offline
Global Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 8:25 am
Posts: 1467
Location: Europe
dude wrote:
Cloudy wrote:
Hello

Has anyone here ever renewed their precepts. I took mine originally some time ago (not particularly seriously) and have never deliberately broken them, but I would like to Renew them.

But I want to understand what it means to renew your precepts (but from a Buddhist point of view) - because I want to basically have a fresh start with my precepts.


What is the significance of renewing them?

By doing something against them they can be damaged and decline.
To renew them makes them strong again. Like washing clothes. :smile:

"Precepts" means Pratimoksa-vows, isn't it?

Normally a vow is renewed by saying it again in good motivation.

_________________
Metta, Karuna, Mudita, Upekha
*** om vajra krodha hayagrīva hulu hulu hūm phat**


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 12:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:10 am
Posts: 327
In theravada tradition the laity renew the 5 precepts at every dana offering.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 1:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2010 10:41 am
Posts: 2776
Quote:
In theravada tradition the laity renew the 5 precepts at every dana offering.
And daily during their formal morning and evening liturgy/chanting session

_________________
TWTB BIES OCB DDM BWF


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 4:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:49 pm
Posts: 16
Hi,

In my case it meant taking them before a teacher in a serious, thoughtful frame of mind, contemplating and reciting them daily, and considering their broader as well as narrower meanings. I speak of the five precepts for lay persons here. On retreats, we add three and adjust one. I can be more specific if you like. These eight are taken each morning during retreat, as the five are taken each morning during the normal course of life. The precepts cause us to consider right action, the foundation of practice. Parenthetically, they tell me that with my taking refuge and precepts certification card in hand, I will not have to pay like a tourist to get into Buddhist temples in China, but I will get in free as a Buddhist. Strange world, and maybe not the best reason for taking precepts again.

Since there are so many interpretations of the meanings and significance of the five precepts, for me, a continual process of thinking them through is perhaps the most important aspect of living them.

Sorry to ramble.

Michael (Buddharūci)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 4:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2010 10:41 am
Posts: 2776
Quote:
Parenthetically, they tell me that with my taking refuge and precepts certification card in hand, I will not have to pay like a tourist to get into Buddhist temples in China, but I will get in free as a Buddhist. Strange world, and maybe not the best reason for taking precepts again.
:shock: Really??? No other conditions attached? I have a pilgrimage trip planned this year to Putuoshan. Time to dig out my cert... :mrgreen:

_________________
TWTB BIES OCB DDM BWF


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 6:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:49 pm
Posts: 16
Hi,

Well, it's hearsay until we try it. you should report on whether the certificate worked its economic magic. I'd be happy to contribute to Buddhist temples in China, but I'd like to know my contribution supports the Dharma.

On a different but related note, I'm interested in knowing more about the meaning and significance of Bodhissatva vows among the different Buddhist schools represented here among us. Thanks.

Michael (Buddharūci)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 7:18 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 4:51 am
Posts: 1471
It's not uncommon for Dharma tourists to use their refuge or precept certificate to try to get in free to monasteries that have door tickets in the PRoC, usually by loud exclamations of who their preceptor is, and how they have such-and-such guanxi. <shudder>

~~ Huifeng

_________________
My Prajñācāra Blog
Buddhist Studies at Fo Guang University, Taiwan


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 7:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:49 pm
Posts: 16
Is it like that? I don't think you'll find me screeching about my preceptor nor my guanxi. I'll just determine to stay or not, hopefully after gathering some equanimity and loving kindness about me. But, who knows what will happen. Have never been to China, and in all likelihood won't. Michael (Buddharūci)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:03 am 
Offline
Global Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 8:25 am
Posts: 1467
Location: Europe
Asoka1944 wrote:
....

On a different but related note, I'm interested in knowing more about the meaning and significance of Bodhissatva vows among the different Buddhist schools represented here among us. Thanks.

Michael (Buddharūci)


Here is very much stuff to read in the tibetean tradition:


http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/ar ... edges.html

The whole content: http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/x/nav ... 79529.html

_________________
Metta, Karuna, Mudita, Upekha
*** om vajra krodha hayagrīva hulu hulu hūm phat**


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:37 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2009 5:22 pm
Posts: 417
Location: East Coast of Canada
plwk wrote:
Quote:
Parenthetically, they tell me that with my taking refuge and precepts certification card in hand, I will not have to pay like a tourist to get into Buddhist temples in China, but I will get in free as a Buddhist. Strange world, and maybe not the best reason for taking precepts again.
:shock: Really??? No other conditions attached? I have a pilgrimage trip planned this year to Putuoshan. Time to dig out my cert... :mrgreen:

What, they have Buddhist membership cards now? :shock: Oy! :shrug:

Om mani padme hum
Keith


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2010 10:41 am
Posts: 2776
KeithBC wrote:
plwk wrote:
Quote:
Parenthetically, they tell me that with my taking refuge and precepts certification card in hand, I will not have to pay like a tourist to get into Buddhist temples in China, but I will get in free as a Buddhist. Strange world, and maybe not the best reason for taking precepts again.
:shock: Really??? No other conditions attached? I have a pilgrimage trip planned this year to Putuoshan. Time to dig out my cert... :mrgreen:

What, they have Buddhist membership cards now? :shock: Oy! :shrug:

Om mani padme hum
Keith
Tsk tsk Keith ... gone are the flower power days where hardly anything goes on record :lol:
It's just a simple piece of paper or card that states some information, which may vary from organisation to organisation, the Refuge/Lay Precepts (stating the type of precepts: ranging from the basic 5 up until the Bodhisattva Precepts) ceremony date/time/venue, name of Refuge/Preceptor Master (may come with a seal or insignia stamp), lineage, one's Refuge & actual name & Date of birth and cert./card serial number.
Along with this, some door gifts may be distributed to the attendees, like they may give a wrist mala or a Buddhist pendant or a pocket size votive picture card of Buddhas/Bodhisattvas or a simple Dharma booklet or a commemorative CD/DVD (normally if it is in conjunction with a special event).

And no, this is not any kind of specific membership with the officiating/organising temple, monastery or centre of the Refuge & Precepts ceremony, that's a separate matter, they may encourage you to join them but normally no obligations. Some places may tie up the ceremony with an instant membership, so it varies.

As for the OP's Q, yes I have done a 'renewal' before with the Founding Master of the organisation when he came to my country back in 2009, just so to create Dharma affinity and the most important one: as a gesture of practice reminder and resolve. I have heard of how some do it to show off a 'resume' of having made a connection with so and so Master and organisation and then start claiming that they are disciples of so and so, when it's just an open ceremony for all and the issue of claiming that so and so master is one's root teacher are totally separate matters unless specified during the public ceremony or as a private initiative.

_________________
TWTB BIES OCB DDM BWF


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:49 pm
Posts: 16
Thank you for the information. It's a bit different from what I thought was the central focus of the boddhisattva vow. It's time to talk with the venerables.
Michael (Buddharūci)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2009 5:22 pm
Posts: 417
Location: East Coast of Canada
plwk wrote:
Tsk tsk Keith ... gone are the flower power days where hardly anything goes on record :lol:
...
Along with this, some door gifts may be distributed to the attendees,

:shock: Door prizes, too??? Aaargh!! Please tell me I just took some bad acid! :D


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 7:29 pm 
Online

Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 3:38 am
Posts: 556
On a different but related note, I'm interested in knowing more about the meaning and significance of Bodhissatva vows among the different Buddhist schools represented here among us. Thanks.

Living beings are numberless. I vow to save them.
Earthly desires are countless. I vow to eradicate them.
The Buddha's teachings are immeasurable. I vow to master them.
Enlightenment is supreme among all achievements. I vow to attain it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:49 pm
Posts: 16
dude wrote:
On a different but related note, I'm interested in knowing more about the meaning and significance of Bodhissatva vows among the different Buddhist schools represented here among us. Thanks.

Living beings are numberless. I vow to save them.
Earthly desires are countless. I vow to eradicate them.
The Buddha's teachings are immeasurable. I vow to master them.
Enlightenment is supreme among all achievements. I vow to attain it.





Yes, that's the language I'm familiar with.
Some traditions give us more complex
lists breaking the basics into bite sized
bits. But yours is the one I "grew up"
with. Where did the Translation come
from, may I ask? Thanks for posting It.
Michael (Buddharūci)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:30 pm 
Online

Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 3:38 am
Posts: 556
you got me, I don't have a source.
I had to think for a long time to remember the right wording, but I never did find the exact words in my books. Come to think of it, it's from memory so you could consider it my paraphrase.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group