YOU CANNOT POST. OUR WEB HOSTING COMPANY DECIDED TO MOVE THE SERVER TO ANOTHER LOCATION. IN THE MEANTIME, YOU CAN VIEW THIS VERSION WHICH DOES NOT ALLOW POSTING AND WILL NOT SAVE ANYTHING YOU DO ONCE THE OTHER SERVER GOES ONLINE.

Assessing ones progress - Dhamma Wheel

Assessing ones progress

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
Digity
Posts: 1205
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2011 2:13 am

Assessing ones progress

Postby Digity » Mon Aug 08, 2011 3:33 am

How does one go about assessing ones progress along the path? Does this require a teacher or do you think it can be done by oneself. I sometimes think I might be overestimating or underestimating certain "developments". I sometimes feel like I'm possibly deluding myself about my position along the path. Maybe it's best not to think about this. What are your thoughts?

User avatar
David N. Snyder
Site Admin
Posts: 10648
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 4:15 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Contact:

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby David N. Snyder » Mon Aug 08, 2011 3:49 am

Progress on the path / progress with meditation are pretty much related:

1. If you are generally happier than before you started meditating
2. If you notice an increase in positive and a decrease in negative qualities within yourself
3. If you are more relaxed and open
4. If you are able to be more objective about yourself, these are good indicators that your meditation is going the way it should

http://www.dhammawiki.com/index.php?tit ... meditation
Image




User avatar
Goofaholix
Posts: 2928
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:49 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby Goofaholix » Mon Aug 08, 2011 3:52 am


Digity
Posts: 1205
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2011 2:13 am

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby Digity » Mon Aug 08, 2011 4:09 am


User avatar
Ben
Posts: 18442
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:49 am
Location: kanamaluka

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby Ben » Mon Aug 08, 2011 4:20 am

“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

(Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • •

e: [email protected]..

Nyana
Posts: 2233
Joined: Tue Apr 27, 2010 11:56 am

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby Nyana » Mon Aug 08, 2011 4:30 am

:goodpost:

plwk
Posts: 1464
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 5:14 am

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby plwk » Mon Aug 08, 2011 4:34 am

Your online forum visits starts decreasing....

User avatar
Monkey Mind
Posts: 538
Joined: Sat Dec 05, 2009 8:56 pm
Location: Pacific Northwest, USA

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby Monkey Mind » Mon Aug 08, 2011 7:26 am

"As I am, so are others;
as others are, so am I."
Having thus identified self and others,
harm no one nor have them harmed.

Sutta Nipāta 3.710

User avatar
Viscid
Posts: 930
Joined: Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada
Contact:

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby Viscid » Mon Aug 08, 2011 8:21 pm

"What holds attention determines action." - William James

rowyourboat
Posts: 1952
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: London, UK

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby rowyourboat » Mon Aug 08, 2011 9:50 pm

Hi Diggity

If you 1) craving 2) aversion and 3) delusion- starts reducing you are on the right track

If your peace of mind increases (ie a higher form of happiness, really) then it is good.

If you become a more virtuous person.

If you get on better with your spouse/partner and your parents

If you become less lazy, less self critical, more accepting of changes

Less obsessed with material possessions and value the 'immaterial' more

:anjali:

with metta

Matheesha
With Metta

Karuna
Mudita
& Upekkha

User avatar
bodom
Posts: 5713
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby bodom » Tue Aug 09, 2011 1:05 am

To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo


With mindfulness immersed in the body
well established, restrained
with regard to the six media of contact,
always centered, the monk
can know Unbinding for himself.

- Ud 3.5


https://www.dhammatalks.org/index.html
http://www.ajahnchah.org/

User avatar
ground
Posts: 2591
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 6:01 am

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby ground » Tue Aug 09, 2011 2:49 am


SarathW
Posts: 8014
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 2:49 am

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby SarathW » Thu Apr 16, 2015 10:23 pm

“As the lamp consumes oil, the path realises Nibbana”

chownah
Posts: 6161
Joined: Wed Aug 12, 2009 2:19 pm

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby chownah » Fri Apr 17, 2015 2:59 am

Here is a devise which can be used to do the assessing:

AN 4.28
PTS: A ii 27
Ariya-vamsa Sutta: The Discourse on the Traditions of the Noble Ones
translated from the Pali by
Thanissaro Bhikkhu
© 1996
These four traditions of the Noble Ones — original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated, unadulterated from the beginning — are not open to suspicion, will never be open to suspicion, and are unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives and brahmans. Which four?

There is the case where a monk is content with any old robe cloth at all. He speaks in praise of being content with any old robe cloth at all. He does not, for the sake of robe cloth, do anything unseemly or inappropriate. Not getting cloth, he is not agitated. Getting cloth, he uses it not tied to it, uninfatuated, guiltless, seeing the drawbacks (of attachment to it), and discerning the escape from them. He does not, on account of his contentment with any old robe cloth at all, exalt himself or disparage others. In this he is skillful, energetic, alert, and mindful. This, monks, is said to be a monk standing firm in the ancient, original traditions of the Noble Ones.

Furthermore, the monk is content with any old almsfood at all. He speaks in praise of being content with any old almsfood at all. He does not, for the sake of almsfood, do anything unseemly or inappropriate. Not getting almsfood, he is not agitated. Getting almsfood, he uses it not tied to it, uninfatuated, guiltless, seeing the drawbacks (of attachment to it), and discerning the escape from them. He does not, on account of his contentment with any old almsfood at all, exalt himself or disparage others. In this he is skillful, energetic, alert, and mindful. This, monks, is said to be a monk standing firm in the ancient, original traditions of the Noble Ones.

Furthermore, the monk is content with any old lodging at all. He speaks in praise of being content with any old lodging at all. He does not, for the sake of lodging, do anything unseemly or inappropriate. Not getting lodging, he is not agitated. Getting lodging, he uses it not tied to it, uninfatuated, guiltless, seeing the drawbacks (of attachment to it), and discerning the escape from them. He does not, on account of his contentment with any old lodging at all, exalt himself or disparage others. In this he is skillful, energetic, alert, and mindful. This, monks, is said to be a monk standing firm in the ancient, original traditions of the Noble Ones.

Furthermore, the monk finds pleasure and delight in developing (skillful mental qualities), finds pleasure and delight in abandoning (unskillful mental qualities). He does not, on account of his pleasure and delight in developing and abandoning, exalt himself or disparage others. In this he is skillful, energetic, alert, and mindful. This, monks, is said to be a monk standing firm in the ancient, original traditions of the Noble Ones.

These are the four traditions of the Noble Ones — original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated, unadulterated from the beginning — which are not open to suspicion, will never be open to suspicion, and are unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives and brahmans.

And furthermore, a monk endowed with these four traditions of the Noble Ones, if he lives in the east, conquers displeasure and is not conquered by displeasure. If he lives in the west... the north... the south, he conquers displeasure and is not conquered by displeasure. Why is that? Because the wise one endures both pleasure and displeasure.

This is what the Blessed One said. Having said this, he said further:

Displeasure does not conquer the enlightened one.
Displeasure does not suppress him.
He conquers displeasure
because he endures it.

Having cast away all deeds:
who could obstruct him?
Like an ornament of finest gold:
Who is fit to find fault with him?
Even the Devas praise him,
even by Brahma is he praised.
---------------------------------------------------------
Have you made progress in conquering displeasure?
chownah

User avatar
pilgrim
Posts: 1348
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 2:56 pm

Re: Assessing ones progress

Postby pilgrim » Fri Apr 17, 2015 3:34 am

There is another recent thread with the same question but worded differently as "How to measure spiritual development?". Perhaps they can be merged.

The Sankhitta Sutta (S 48.13) explains that “the difference in individuals” is due to one’s level in cultivating the five spiritual faculties
(panca indriya)—faith, effort, mindfulness, concentration, wisdom:

“By accomplishment and perfection in the five faculties one is an arahant. If the faculties are weaker, one is a non-returner; if they are still weaker, one is a once-returner, or a stream-winner, or a Dhamma-devotee (dhammanusarin), or a faith-devotee (saddhanusarin) Thus, monks, through the difference of faculties, there is difference of result; and the difference of results makes for the difference of individuals."


Return to “Connections to Other Paths”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 16 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine