East Asian Buddhist Schools?

Whether you're exploring Buddhism for the first time or you're already on the path, feel free to ask questions of any kind here.

East Asian Buddhist Schools?

Postby edwhys211 » Tue Dec 11, 2012 2:46 am

What are the different Schools from China and Japan, what makes each unique, and what are their beliefs on karma and rebirth?
edwhys211
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 2:31 am

Re: East Asian Buddhist Schools?

Postby Seishin » Tue Dec 11, 2012 1:06 pm

That's a lot to process and the last questions could get louded.

Chinese Buddhism is predominantly Chan of various schools; see here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zen
There are also Chinese Pureland Schools http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pure_Land_Buddhism
Chinese Tientai http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiantai
Chinese Buddhism http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Buddhism

Japanese Buddhism http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism_in_Japan
Including the various zen schools, (soto, rinzai, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Zen) Japanese Tendai http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tendai, Shingon http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shingon_Buddhism, Japenese Pure Land (Jodo Shu, Jodo Shin Shu) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C5%8Ddo-sh%C5%AB

I'm sure there are many more to add to that list however my memory is not great! :tongue:

As for their beliefs of karma and rebirth, to my limited knowledge, officially all these schools see them in the orthodox sense (ie they are true and literal) however some schools like Japanese Zen tend not to place much emphasis on it compared with Pure Land for example. However I'm sure there are some teachers within these traditions who dissagree with the orthodox stance, especially in the West.

I hope that helps to answer your question and I look forward to other posters adding/correcting this :smile:

Gassho,
Seishin.
User avatar
Seishin
Former staff member
 
Posts: 1408
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 11:53 am

Re: East Asian Buddhist Schools?

Postby Astus » Tue Dec 11, 2012 1:56 pm

Right now it shows that the service is temporarily unavailable, but this is a very good summary of Chinese Buddhist schools: Buddhism In a Nutshell Archives

This is a summary of the ten Chinese schools: The Chinese Buddhist Schools

Traditional view of karma and rebirth is practically identical in all schools.

One more important thing to know about Chinese Buddhism is that "schools" exist only in theory, they are simply philosophical and practical categories of different types of teachings, but monasteries and communities seldom if ever specialise in only one or two of the schools.
"There is no such thing as the real mind. Ridding yourself of delusion: that's the real mind."
(Sheng-yen: Getting the Buddha Mind, p 73)

“Don’t rashly seek the true Buddha;
True Buddha can’t be found.
Does marvelous nature and spirit
Need tempering or refinement?
Mind is this mind carefree;
This face, the face at birth."

(Nanyue Mingzan: Enjoying the Way, tr. Jeff Shore; T51n2076, p461b24-26)
User avatar
Astus
Former staff member
 
Posts: 4226
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:22 pm
Location: Budapest

Re: East Asian Buddhist Schools?

Postby icylake » Tue Dec 11, 2012 2:25 pm

in fact after 8-9th centuries, in Chinese buddhism, the "school" lost it's importance. only chan and pure land remained as distictive schools. and even those two schools were assimilated each other.

in Japanese buddhism, the meaning of "school" was almost the same to that of chinese counter parts in ancient times. but later, many schools have evolved into independent "sects or denominations", have their owm distinctive costumes, have their own distinctive ceremonies, have their owm distintive basic sutras. have their independent monasteries, even the buddha statues enshrined in the dharma halls are different accordng to their sectarian sutras. i've read this phenomena was owing to japan's "political Fudalism" in their middle age which other east asian countries had never experienced.

when it comes to the concepts of "karma" and "rebirth", they are almost the same. they still belong to east-Asian mahayana buddhism.
icylake
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2012 2:05 pm

Re: East Asian Buddhist Schools?

Postby Astus » Tue Dec 11, 2012 4:06 pm

icylake wrote:in fact after 8-9th centuries, in Chinese buddhism, the "school" lost it's importance. only chan and pure land remained as distictive schools. and even those two schools were assimilated each other.


Chan as a school with its own organisation did not exist before the Song dynasty, but even then it just meant that a "Chan monastery" is a public monastery led by an abbot who is affiliated to the Chan lineage, but beyond that the monks' lives were as in any other monastery in the kingdom. Pure Land never had its own organisation, except for certain lay devotional communities. Tiantai was the major rival lineage, but again, it is an administrative issue rather than actual difference in daily monastic life. Strong distinct schools as in Japan never existed in China, because of the difference in regional and imperial government.
"There is no such thing as the real mind. Ridding yourself of delusion: that's the real mind."
(Sheng-yen: Getting the Buddha Mind, p 73)

“Don’t rashly seek the true Buddha;
True Buddha can’t be found.
Does marvelous nature and spirit
Need tempering or refinement?
Mind is this mind carefree;
This face, the face at birth."

(Nanyue Mingzan: Enjoying the Way, tr. Jeff Shore; T51n2076, p461b24-26)
User avatar
Astus
Former staff member
 
Posts: 4226
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:22 pm
Location: Budapest

Re: East Asian Buddhist Schools?

Postby icylake » Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:16 pm

Astus wrote:
icylake wrote:in fact after 8-9th centuries, in Chinese buddhism, the "school" lost it's importance. only chan and pure land remained as distictive schools. and even those two schools were assimilated each other.


Chan as a school with its own organisation did not exist before the Song dynasty, but even then it just meant that a "Chan monastery" is a public monastery led by an abbot who is affiliated to the Chan lineage, but beyond that the monks' lives were as in any other monastery in the kingdom. Pure Land never had its own organisation, except for certain lay devotional communities. Tiantai was the major rival lineage, but again, it is an administrative issue rather than actual difference in daily monastic life. Strong distinct schools as in Japan never existed in China, because of the difference in regional and imperial government.


yes, i agree. "the school' i used here is just reffering unorganized "trend" in a wise sense. but incorrect.. :emb:

and it's very interesting that Korea had had distinctive buddhist sects from Koryo dynasty up to early Joson dynasty also(From Zen, Avatamsaka up to esoteric buddhism), but it's not owing to fudalism like Japan, to the contrary, because of national official exam by centralised government.
the government released licenses, and registered the supreme temple of every sect. it's very different from China's situatuion. even though they had had the monk license(du die) and administrative institutions, but helding nation-wide exam , like confucianist one-was very rare. so even now(after unification and assimilation of each sects after 16th century), we can clearly classify the chantings used in korean services into some sectarians. as Avatamsaka, Zen,(although, after the purification in 1960, most Avatamsaka ceremonies and prayers were discarded) it' funny the seemingly simmilar results came from totally different cause.
icylake
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2012 2:05 pm


Return to Exploring Buddhism

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests

>