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 Post subject: Respecting Dharma books
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 12:47 am 
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This time of year, harvest season, I'm in my truck for hours and hours on end. Sitting a lot of the time.
I was wondering if keeping a book I'm reading in the glove box of the truck would be disrespecting the Dharma.
I have time to read and just don't want it bouncing around or falling in the floor while I'm on the move.
I keep all my books in their own separate place at home, they never touch the floor.
Thanks :namaste:

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Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 1:46 am 
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Life of the Buddha : First Sermons:

"...Mara screamed at Siddhartha what right he had to sit on the sacred seat which had seen countless Buddhas enlightened in lives many aeons before him. Siddhartha calmly explained that he was there due to countless previous lives of practising generosity as well as the rest of the ten transcendental virtues. At this point Mara shrieked at Siddhartha what witness he had to back up such statements, to which Siddhartha reached down and touched the earth with his fingertips. "The earth is my witness," he told Mara. At this point there was an immense booming and rumbling which made the earth shake. Mara's host of monsters and Mara himself fled in panic, utterly defeated.

You must have a pretty good truck.
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.
.

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The Chinese characters are Fo (buddha) and Ming (bright). The image is of a student of Buddhism, who, imagining himself to be a monk, and not understanding the true meaning of the words takes the sound of the words literally. Likewise, People on web forums sometime seem to be foaming at the mouth.
Original painting by P.Volker /used by permission.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:02 am 
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As usual, thanks Padma :namaste:

So I'm taking it as it's a ok :twothumbsup:

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Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:50 am 
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I was taught to treat dharma books with respect, which includes not taking it to the toilet, using clean hands whilst holding it, never putting it on the floor, never putting your feet on it etc.... nothing about glove boxes, but it would probably more respectful if it was is it's own bag or some kind of covering to stop any damage.

Some of these rules might be cultural but I think most of them are common sense. :smile:

Gassho,
Seishin.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:56 am 
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Thanks Seishin. I understand the respect aspect, but was really just asking to be sure. I wasn't sure if the glove box would be disrespectful. I will find something to protect the bool/s as well.

:namaste:

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Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 1:16 pm 
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I don't think keeping it in a glove box or not matters. It is good not to let it fall on the floor or to be careless with it. And you should not step over them, if they are on, say, a low table or floor cushion. But the reason, although "respect" is important, is to encourage mindfulness and appreciation for the teachings. It is customary when they do fall on the floor to touch the book to the top of your head or forehead.

I once helped carry metal chests of of Tibetan texts (Kangyur & Tangyur) that had been shipped to a well known Monastery building in upstate New York. They were large. The lama I was helping told me, "please remember, do not sit on these. You wouldn't sit on your friend's head, would you?" That made sense, I guess. then I asked him, "would you lock your friend in a metal trunk?"
.
.
.

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Profile Picture: "The Foaming Monk"
The Chinese characters are Fo (buddha) and Ming (bright). The image is of a student of Buddhism, who, imagining himself to be a monk, and not understanding the true meaning of the words takes the sound of the words literally. Likewise, People on web forums sometime seem to be foaming at the mouth.
Original painting by P.Volker /used by permission.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 2:07 pm 
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I think the most respectful thing you can do to the dharma is learn it and apply it.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 2:16 pm 
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Matt J wrote:
I think the most respectful thing you can do to the dharma is learn it and apply it.


:good:


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 3:41 pm 
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PadmaVonSamba wrote:
I don't think keeping it in a glove box or not matters. It is good not to let it fall on the floor or to be careless with it. And you should not step over them, if they are on, say, a low table or floor cushion. But the reason, although "respect" is important, is to encourage mindfulness and appreciation for the teachings. It is customary when they do fall on the floor to touch the book to the top of your head or forehead.

I once helped carry metal chests of of Tibetan texts (Kangyur & Tangyur) that had been shipped to a well known Monastery building in upstate New York. They were large. The lama I was helping told me, "please remember, do not sit on these. You wouldn't sit on your friend's head, would you?" That made sense, I guess. then I asked him, "would you lock your friend in a metal trunk?"
.
.
.

Haha... Did he say anything back?

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 5:34 pm 
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Hello Dave,

my backpack (rucksack) may be somehow worse than your glove box? It's full of papers, crumbs and sometimes licking bottles. So if I have to take a dharma book with me in this bag, i put it in an extra plasticbag. Or in some shops one can buy book-bags - or you can sew one on your own.
The main thing is the book stays clean.

Greetings by Ayu

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:11 pm 
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Pero wrote:
PadmaVonSamba wrote:
I once helped carry metal chests of of Tibetan texts (Kangyur & Tangyur) that had been shipped to a well known Monastery building in upstate New York. They were large. The lama I was helping told me, "please remember, do not sit on these. You wouldn't sit on your friend's head, would you?" That made sense, I guess. then I asked him, "would you lock your friend in a metal trunk?"

Haha... Did he say anything back?


he just shook his head, because he knew that I am an incurable smart-ass.
.
.
.

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Profile Picture: "The Foaming Monk"
The Chinese characters are Fo (buddha) and Ming (bright). The image is of a student of Buddhism, who, imagining himself to be a monk, and not understanding the true meaning of the words takes the sound of the words literally. Likewise, People on web forums sometime seem to be foaming at the mouth.
Original painting by P.Volker /used by permission.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:13 pm 
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Personally I follow what has been already mentioned, but I also keep my dharma on the highest shelf on my bookshelf and only dharma books on that shelf as a sign of respect and I also don't want the dharma mixed with books that are not pure.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 7:53 pm 
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OnePath wrote:
Personally I follow what has been already mentioned, but I also keep my dharma on the highest shelf on my bookshelf and only dharma books on that shelf as a sign of respect and I also don't want the dharma mixed with books that are not pure.

Al of my books are 100% pure books, except for the ones that have pages missing.
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.
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Profile Picture: "The Foaming Monk"
The Chinese characters are Fo (buddha) and Ming (bright). The image is of a student of Buddhism, who, imagining himself to be a monk, and not understanding the true meaning of the words takes the sound of the words literally. Likewise, People on web forums sometime seem to be foaming at the mouth.
Original painting by P.Volker /used by permission.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:24 pm 
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Has anyone else ever considered viewing the floor, toilet, and lower shelves of the bookcase etc. as pure/empty?

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 9:46 pm 
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futerko wrote:
Has anyone else ever considered viewing the floor, toilet, and lower shelves of the bookcase etc. as pure/empty?

I recall reading once that one reason dogs like to drink out of a toilet is because, compared to their water dish, the water in a toilet bowl is replaced much more often throughout the day. Naturally, the view of toilets and toilet areas as unsuitable areas for dharma materials has carried over from days when people did not have indoor plumbing, flush toilets, or a variety of bleaches, sprays, antiseptics and various other bathroom cleaning products to make one's bathroom sparkle.

Sometimes it is the only quiet place a person can find to read a book.
I must admit, I have done a great deal of dharma reading there.
And so, the lotus grows from the swamp.
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.
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Profile Picture: "The Foaming Monk"
The Chinese characters are Fo (buddha) and Ming (bright). The image is of a student of Buddhism, who, imagining himself to be a monk, and not understanding the true meaning of the words takes the sound of the words literally. Likewise, People on web forums sometime seem to be foaming at the mouth.
Original painting by P.Volker /used by permission.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 6:14 pm 
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Thanks for all the repies. As I said, I just wanted to b :namaste: e sure that itwasn't being disrespecful.

_________________
Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 3:34 am 
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Why does it matter? The Buddha taught not to be attached to material objects and that they don't matter. It seems the more I learn about this religion the more it resembles the supernatural superstitions of something like Christianity, which is a huge turn off.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2012 8:58 am 
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I think, to keep books clean in a respectful manner is a tibetean tradition.
In former times a book was something very expensive and precious. Nowadays they are printed very easily and often they are dirty after reading one time.
If they had treated books in ancient times as they are treated today, there wouldn't exist any knowledge about the scriptures today...
So this habit, to treat Dharmabooks respectfully, is an heritage of our ancestors.
Not too bad, I think.

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*** om vajra krodha hayagrīva hulu hulu hūm phat**


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