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Seven enlightenment factors in the context of anapanasati - Dhamma Wheel

Seven enlightenment factors in the context of anapanasati

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
starter
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Seven enlightenment factors in the context of anapanasati

Postby starter » Mon Apr 25, 2011 3:43 pm

Hello Teachers/Friends,

Many thanks for your very helpful info, comments, advice & ... criticism, from which I've learned for developing my mind. Since I've been practicing alone (physically), please do tell me (publicly or privately) if you notice any wrong views/patterns or inappropriate speech/actions from me, big or small. Your kind help has been and will be most appreciated.

I just read the anapanasati sutta (MN 118) again and would like to share with you my new understanding of the culmination of the seven enlightenment factors in the context of the anapanasati practice during our sitting meditation.

First of all, "This is how mindfulness of in-&-out breathing is developed & pursued so as to bring the four frames of reference to their culmination":
On that occasion the monk remains focused on body/feeling/mind/dhamma in & of themselves — ardent, alert, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world. He who sees with discernment the abandoning of greed & distress is one who watches carefully with equanimity, which is why the monk on that occasion remains focused on dhammas in & of themselves — ardent, clearly comprehending, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world.

"And how are the four frames of reference developed & pursued so as to bring the seven factors for awakening to their culmination?

[1] On whatever occasion the monk remains focused on the body in & of itself — ardent, clearly comprehending, & mindful — putting aside greed & distress with reference to the world, on that occasion his mindfulness is steady & without lapse. When his mindfulness is steady & without lapse, then mindfulness as a factor for awakening becomes aroused. He develops it, and for him it goes to the culmination of its development.

[2] Remaining mindful in this way, he examines, analyzes, & comes to a comprehension of that dhamma with discernment. When he remains mindful in this way, examining, analyzing, & coming to a comprehension of that dhamma with discernment, then analysis of dhammas as a factor for awakening becomes aroused. He develops it, and for him it goes to the culmination of its development.
[I'd consider “that dhamma” means body (breathing – bodily fabrications), or feeling (piti/sukha – mental fabrications), or mind (mind states), or dhamma (contemplation of anicca, dispassion, cessation and relinquishing; five aggregates and nibbana), and dhammas mean all of these four. -- what's your opinion about "that dhamma" and "dhammas" here?]

[3] In one who examines, analyzes, & comes to a comprehension of that dhamma with discernment, ardentness is aroused unflaggingly. When ardentness is aroused unflaggingly in one who examines, analyzes, & comes to a comprehension of that dhamma with discernment, then ardentness as a factor for awakening becomes aroused. He develops it, and for him it goes to the culmination of its development.
[I translate the 3rd enlightenment factor as ardentness or ardency, in accordance with "... remains focused on the body in & of itself — ardent, alert, & mindful"]

"[4] In one whose ardentness is aroused, a rapture not-of-the-flesh arises. When a rapture not-of-the-flesh arises in one whose ardentness is aroused, then rapture as a factor for awakening becomes aroused. He develops it, and for him it goes to the culmination of its development.

"[5] For one enraptured at heart, the body grows calm and the mind grows calm. When the body & mind of a monk enraptured at heart grow calm, then serenity as a factor for awakening becomes aroused. He develops it, and for him it goes to the culmination of its development.

"[6] For one who is at ease — his body calmed — the mind becomes concentrated. When the mind of one who is at ease — his body calmed — becomes concentrated, then Samadhi as a factor for awakening becomes aroused. He develops it, and for him it goes to the culmination of its development.

"[7] He carefully watches the mind thus concentrated with equanimity. When he carefully watches the mind thus concentrated with equanimity, equanimity as a factor for awakening becomes aroused. He develops it, and for him it goes to the culmination of its development.

(Similarly with the other three frames of reference: feelings, mind, & Dhammas.)
"This is how the four mindfulness are developed & pursued so as to bring the seven factors for awakening to their culmination.

Metta to all,

Starter
Last edited by starter on Sat May 26, 2012 8:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Dmytro
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Re: Seven enlightenment factors in the context of anapanasati

Postby Dmytro » Tue Apr 26, 2011 4:56 am




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