An American Buddhist Tradition

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
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Goofaholix
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Goofaholix » Tue Jan 04, 2011 11:31 pm

It's already been tried with the FWBO, and I find the results pretty uninspiring (Though it's not specifically American but then why would you want to limit it one country anyway).

In the West I think we have the freedom to look at the tradition objectively and seperate cultural baggage from the essential living tradition, then centres have the option of keeping or ditching some or all of the cultural baggage as they please. It's already happening and it's already working I think.

Wheras establishing an official tradition would be all about confortmity and institutionlisation and adding new cultural baggage, where did that ever enhance a religion.

So are we wanting to add American cultural baggage in it's place? No thank you, I don't want fries with that and you can't tell me to have a nice day as I'll have whatever kind of day I please.

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Khalil Bodhi
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Tue Jan 04, 2011 11:40 pm

:goodpost: ...but do you seriously want us to believe you don't want to have a nice day? :tongue:
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

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Goofaholix
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Goofaholix » Tue Jan 04, 2011 11:58 pm


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Kim OHara
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Kim OHara » Wed Jan 05, 2011 12:14 am


Jack
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Jack » Thu Jan 13, 2011 3:19 am

I am not clear about those who want to adhere to a certain eastern Buddhist tradition and denigrate Western Buddhism. Didn't each of those eastern Buddhist traditions develop their own traditions, new cultural trappings, different ceremonies? Buddhism of Tibet, China, Sri Lanka and so on, all are different on the surface. Is Western Buddhism the only one that has to adopt from another culture?

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Goofaholix
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Goofaholix » Thu Jan 13, 2011 4:31 am


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David N. Snyder
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby David N. Snyder » Thu Jan 13, 2011 5:16 am

Image




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Hanzze
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Hanzze » Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:34 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*


BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Nate sante baram sokham _()_

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tiltbillings
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Jan 13, 2011 12:57 pm


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Viscid
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Viscid » Thu Jan 13, 2011 7:55 pm

Is it even possible to create a tradition that is free from the culture in which it is established?

Would denying any influence of culture create an institution that is alien to those that express that culture?

Buddhism has survived by adapting itself from culture to culture, offering itself in varieties which the people in its proximity demand. Given time, I believe Western Buddhism will adapt, survive and evolve in such a way to represent the Dhamma while incorporating the beliefs and attitudes of the West.
"What holds attention determines action." - William James

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Hanzze
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Hanzze » Fri Jan 14, 2011 2:32 am

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*


BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Nate sante baram sokham _()_

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theravada_guy
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby theravada_guy » Fri Jan 14, 2011 2:40 am

In America, we have Theravada, Vajrayana and all the other Mahayana traditions represented pretty well, as far as I'm aware. My two cents is to leave it at that. Personally, I like how there's a choice here. If you want Theravada, it's here. You don't have to go to Sri Lanka or Thailand anymore. If you want Mahayana, you don't have to go to those countries. It's all here. Maybe that IS the American Buddhism - having a choice of which tradition the individual wants to follow.
With metta,

Justin

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Kim OHara
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Kim OHara » Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:15 am


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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Paññāsikhara » Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:51 am

My recently moved Blog, containing some of my writings on the Buddha Dhamma, as well as a number of translations from classical Buddhist texts and modern authors, liturgy, etc.: .

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Goofaholix
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Goofaholix » Fri Jan 14, 2011 8:33 am


PeterB
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby PeterB » Fri Jan 14, 2011 8:58 am


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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Paññāsikhara » Fri Jan 14, 2011 9:24 am

My recently moved Blog, containing some of my writings on the Buddha Dhamma, as well as a number of translations from classical Buddhist texts and modern authors, liturgy, etc.: .

Paññāsikhara
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Paññāsikhara » Fri Jan 14, 2011 9:25 am

My recently moved Blog, containing some of my writings on the Buddha Dhamma, as well as a number of translations from classical Buddhist texts and modern authors, liturgy, etc.: .

PeterB
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby PeterB » Fri Jan 14, 2011 9:40 am

I have studied Pali Sankrit and Mandarin Ven Huifeng. And was taught early on not to attempt to impose grammatical structures derived from the Romano-Hellenic world view on to those languages which have evolved from a very different world view.

We can certainly agree about internalisation, and that european languages simply do not have a vocabulary for states and experiences that it has not encountered apart perhaps from atypically and randomly . Martin Lings in his " Ancient Beliefs And Modern Superstitions " points out that the reverse is also true. He gives examples of what it would take to translate a simple engineering concept. like that of a gear lever for example and render that into Pali or Sanskrit...the result would be a series of multi syllabic compound words which would take up half page of A4 text..it ( Pali ) was not built for that use. Anymore than English evolved to transmit to subtleties of the meditative experience.

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Hanzze
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Re: An American Buddhist Tradition

Postby Hanzze » Fri Jan 14, 2011 9:48 am

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Feb 01, 2011 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*


BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Nate sante baram sokham _()_


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