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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2012 7:04 pm 
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Hi all,

How is the generation of the enlightened resolve (bodhicitta?) cultivated in EA traditions as opposed to Tibetan Tradition?

Thank you!


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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2012 10:21 pm 
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sangyey wrote:
Hi all,

How is the generation of the enlightened resolve (bodhicitta?) cultivated in EA traditions as opposed to Tibetan Tradition?

Thank you!



i'm not familiar with what is meant by EA traditions, it seems a bit broad. so i'll try to expand your question, instead of trying to pit the two together.

How is the generation of the enlightened resolve (bodhichitta) (compassion) cultivated in All buddhist traditions? Are there differences in actual technique or it simply a difference in terminology?

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PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2012 12:17 am 
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The Tibetan Tradition uses the 4 immeasurables, Shantideva's equalizing and exchanging method, as well as Atisha's method even though they are all basically rooted in love and compassion.

Just wondering about other traditions if just generally the 4 immeasurables and also if Maitreya's definition of bodhicitta as the wish to attain buddhahood for others is used in other traditions presentation.


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PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2012 12:41 am 
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sangyey wrote:
The Tibetan Tradition uses the 4 immeasurables, Shantideva's equalizing and exchanging method, as well as Atisha's method even though they are all basically rooted in love and compassion.

Just wondering about other traditions if just generally the 4 immeasurables and also if Maitreya's definition of bodhicitta as the wish to attain buddhahood for others is used in other traditions presentation.


alright. i'm going to take a stab here, but i have to admit that i'm not the type of individual that can critically analyze particular terminology in the sense that you describe them.

but since i have the time and i'm willing, i have Shantideva's Engaging in the Conduct of a Bodhisatva by Sazang Mati Panchen and there is no mention of "the four immeasurables" as you speak of, there are several listings for the "four ... " but no imeasurables, in the glossary. i have to admit i have yet to browse this text but have it (i carefully opened the goldend edged pages to check.) this could be a translation issues, or perhaps a different use of terminology used by the translator.

as for maitreya, i'm no expert. but i'm not quite sure what you are trying to reference...

perhaps a deeper explanation on your part, such as explaining the four imeasurables you speak of as well as posting what you understand Maitreya's view of boddhicitta is may help. It may not necessarily help me, since i'm no master of particular terms, but others that may know more than i do, in the textual sense of learning, such as, more intricate definitions and sources.

the questions you have may be relevant and helpful, i'm just not quite sure about the specifics, since you appear to be seeing whether or not anyeone familiar with them and whether or not those same topics/practices are prevelant in other buddhist traditions outside of tibet. i could go on and on about my issues of trying to retain words and so forth, but this isn't the thread to do it.


i only replied to you at first because i thought i could help you refine your question/questions.

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PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2012 4:32 am 
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sangyey wrote:
Hi all,

How is the generation of the enlightened resolve (bodhicitta?) cultivated in EA traditions as opposed to Tibetan Tradition?

Thank you!


Short answer: Just keep on readin' them Mahayana sutras, should do the trick! :smile:

Almost all forms of Chinese liturgy feature bodhicitta in them at regular intervals,
eg. the basic three refuges formula is a bodhicitta form of refuge pulled from the Avatamsaka,
this section of the Avatamsaka, the "Pure Practices" chapter, has a long section
which makes almost all daily activities some form of bodhicitta practice.
A lot of monasteries will have these verses even pinned on the walls at the appropriate location,
eg. the bathroom, the kitchen, next to your bed, etc.

~~ Huifeng

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PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2012 4:39 am 
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East Asian Buddhism does not use Santideva's Bodhicaryavatara as a rule.
While there was a translation of this into Chinese early on, it never took off.
In the very recent modern period, maybe 20 years or so, some newer translations
often from Tibetan or Sanskrit, have become popular in Taiwan,
but they are still not at all mainstream, and are more like Taiwanese
Tibetan Buddhism books and stuff.

While the four immeasurables are obviously well known in the Far East,
it would probably be more common to recite the name of Guan(shi)yin Bodhisattva,
(Avalokitesvara), and / or the Great Compassion Dharani (Dabei Zhou /
Mahakarunika-dharani), to generate the appropriate great compassion required.

In East Asia, "bodhicitta" was first translated as 道心, which a lot of people
render as "mind of the path" (if they don't know their Chinese translation history),
but the most common is just 菩提心, "bodhi mind", transliterating the "bodhi".
Usually in the compound involving 發(菩提)心 "aspire (bodhi) mind", which
means to have the inspiration to attain anuttara samyak sambodhi,
in order to liberate all sentient beings.

Refer any and all Mahayana literature for sources. :smile:

~~ Huifeng

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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 3:15 am 
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Thank you.


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PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 3:18 am 
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sangyey wrote:
Hi all,

How is the generation of the enlightened resolve (bodhicitta?) cultivated in EA traditions as opposed to Tibetan Tradition?

Thank you!


As the Venerable Huifeng mentioned, bodhicitta motivation in EA is not confined to one or two texts or lineages. But here is a modern Bhikshu in the Chinese tradition who gives us some samples of influential texts - see the last two books, under Bodhicitta: http://www.kalavinka.org/

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