Origins of Anuyoga in Kyrgyzstan

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Origins of Anuyoga in Kyrgyzstan

Postby Sherlock » Thu May 24, 2012 2:48 pm

ChNN has said a few times that anuyoga was mainly transmitted to Tibet from what is currently Kyrgyzstan. Does anyone have more information about this? There does not seem to be an archaeological record of a literate, Buddhist culture there. Could it be instead a reference to the Tocharians?
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Re: Origins of Anuyoga in Kyrgyzstan

Postby Malcolm » Thu May 24, 2012 6:37 pm

Sherlock wrote:ChNN has said a few times that anuyoga was mainly transmitted to Tibet from what is currently Kyrgyzstan. Does anyone have more information about this? There does not seem to be an archaeological record of a literate, Buddhist culture there. Could it be instead a reference to the Tocharians?



It depends on whether you identify 'Dru sha as a corruptions of "Turkish" as ChNN seems to, or whether you think 'bru sha is Gilgit, which is the modern academic consensus.
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Re: Origins of Anuyoga in Kyrgyzstan

Postby simhamuka » Wed Jun 06, 2012 3:23 am

Actually, Namkai Norbu's historical work might be a good place to start. I think the Library of Congress would have the academic research he's done, or if you have access to a university library, you can probably get it lent from the University of Virginia, or the University of Wisconsin in Madison, WI--anywhere that has a good Buddhist studies program.

ETA: I haven't read anything by him about the origins of Anuyoga in Kyrgyzstan, but his historical work on the origins of pre-Yarlung Valley society is the best I've found. He's working from very tenuous sources, songs, legends, bits and pieces, and some people have criticized his work on that basis. But I mean, Indian historical research is sometimes based on less. We're lucky if we find coins.
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