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PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 6:50 pm 
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Hi there, am just starting out trying to learn some Sanskrit, and am trying to translate parts of the Trimsika by Vasubandhu, but am baffled as to how to break this down : dauṣṭhulyahānitaḥ

The verse is here : acitto'nupalambho'sau jñānaṁ lokottaraṁ ca tat āśrayasya parāvṛttirdvidhā dauṣṭhulyahānitaḥ

And one translation is : It is without thought, without basis, and is the supramundane cognition. The revulsion from the substratum results from the loss of the twofold corruption.

So it's referring to the twofold something, and has been translated as either corruption, depravities, wickedness, coarseness, and probably many more examples. What I'm trying to do though is break that word down to see exactly where the root of that part is that they're translating. The only thing I've found so far is finding that anitah can be "brought", or "being brought in", but it doesn't even seem to relate to the verse.

As a final thing, I'm wondering exactly what it's referring to, if anyone knows. I thought it might be the two hindrances : http://www.acmuller.net/articles/reinte ... ances.html But if so, why hasn't it simply been translated that way? So am kind of stuck in two ways. Thanks if anyone can help anyway.

Edit : It seems to partly break down to daustulya, and have found this, which makes me even less sure I'm looking at the right part :

Quote:
The ASbh comments that the first, cittasraya-p. 40 means the tathatasraya-p., and the third, daustulya-p., means the alayavijnana's revolution. The second, margasraya-p., connects the first and third, and is related to the right practice of samatha and vipassana without which one can neither destroy the impure defilements, nor arrive at the transcendental world. In other words, without the margasraya-p., the cittasraya-p. and daustulyasraya-p. cannot succeed.


Link is here but you'll have to search for daustulya. It's a .pdf file from the Journal of International Association of Buddhist Studies : http://archiv.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/ojs/ ... /8639/2546

It's also broken down to daustulya-hanitah here (verse 29.) : http://wwzc.org/dharma-text/only-knowin ... ika-karika

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 8:05 pm 
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Kochumuttom seems to think it's the two hindrances as well. In A Buddhist Doctine of Experience, he says that this verse is referring to the "twofold removal of wickedness", which he says are jneya and klesa avarana, which corresponds with attachment to object and subject. Still no idea how this is arrived at from daustulya and hanita though.

After searching a bit more I think I might have it : daustulya seems to have its root in duSTatA - दुष्टता which can translate to wicked, and hanita might be from anita - अनित, which can mean destitute of, or not gone to. So I suppose removed as well?

Thanks if anyone can confirm any of this, but I'm pretty sure now after looking at the actual Sanskrit here : http://www.dsbcproject.org/canon-text/t ... E%E0%A4%83 and then comparing it with this : http://spokensanskrit.de/index.php?tinp ... eginning=0 and this : http://spokensanskrit.de/index.php?scri ... rection=AU

That wasn't fun, but I think it's generally a lot easier and this might just be a rare issue. Hope so anyway. :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 10:14 pm 
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The *Vijnaptimatrasiddhi explains it as "二障種子立麁重名", ie. "the term 'coarseness' is established on the seeds of the two obstructions", ie. obstructions which are afflictions, and obstructions to the knowable.

"hān" is to abandon. Abandonment of the two types of coarseness.

~~~
Non-thought, non-apprehension, this transcendent gnosis,
It is the overturning of the basis, abandonment of the two types of coarseness.
~~~

~~Huifeng

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:02 pm 
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Huifeng is right. The two are the afflictive obstacles and knowledge obstacles. Sthiramati in his commentary on the verse says:

dvidhādauṣṭhulyahānitaḥ |
dvidheti kleśāvaraṇadauṣṭhulyaṃ jñeyāvaraṇadauṣṭhulyañ ca |


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 2:26 am 
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That's a great help, thanks to the both of you!

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