Meaningful in Tibetan

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Meaningful in Tibetan

Postby Astus » Fri Jan 17, 2014 11:38 pm

What is "meaningful" in this poem,

"Like the continuous flow of a great river,
Whatever you do is meaningful."
(Thrangu Rinpoche: Songs of Naropa, p. 99; the verse; in Tibetan)

Could someone explain this word, what it is in Tibetan, its use, etc.?

འབབ་ལྟར། །ཇི་ལྟར་སྤྱད་ཀྱང་དོན་དང་ལྡན།
'bab ltar / ji ltar spyad kyang don dang ldan

The dictionary says "don dang ldan" stands for:

JH-ENG connected with the meaning
JH-OE {C}intent on what is beneficial
JH-SKT {C}artha-yukta

So I presume here "meaningful" (arthayukta - is that only a back translation, or there is such a term in Indian Buddhism?) actually stands for the unlimited compassionate activities of liberating all beings. However, if I just look at the English, the word does not convey such a meaning. Therefore my question.
"There is no such thing as the real mind. Ridding yourself of delusion: that's the real mind."
(Sheng-yen: Getting the Buddha Mind, p 73)

“Don’t rashly seek the true Buddha;
True Buddha can’t be found.
Does marvelous nature and spirit
Need tempering or refinement?
Mind is this mind carefree;
This face, the face at birth."

(Nanyue Mingzan: Enjoying the Way, tr. Jeff Shore; T51n2076, p461b24-26)
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Re: Meaningful in Tibetan

Postby dzogchungpa » Fri Jan 17, 2014 11:46 pm

As far as I know, 'dang ldan' and 'ldan' are synonymous, and basically just mean "with' or "having' etc. Probably 'dang ldan' is used for metrical purposes.
So 'don dang ldan' would just mean "having don", i.e. meaningful, valuable, significant etc.
see:
http://rywiki.tsadra.org/index.php/don_ldan
Note that, in the higher tantras, there is talk of a self and an I, even though in the lower teachings the absence of self and the absence of I is what is always proclaimed. - Tony Duff
To educate the educated is notoriously difficult. - Jacques Barzun
སརྦ་དྷརྨ་དྷཱ་ཏུ་ཨཱཏྨ་ཀོ་྅ཧཾ༔
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Re: Meaningful in Tibetan

Postby Astus » Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:45 am

dzogchungpa wrote:As far as I know, 'dang ldan' and 'ldan' are synonymous,...


It still makes no sense in the text itself. I'd like to understand why the word "meaningful" is used. I assumed that it would be understandable in Tibetan, but if the original contains no other meaning either - and that is what I really want to find out - then there's no difference between the English and the original.
"There is no such thing as the real mind. Ridding yourself of delusion: that's the real mind."
(Sheng-yen: Getting the Buddha Mind, p 73)

“Don’t rashly seek the true Buddha;
True Buddha can’t be found.
Does marvelous nature and spirit
Need tempering or refinement?
Mind is this mind carefree;
This face, the face at birth."

(Nanyue Mingzan: Enjoying the Way, tr. Jeff Shore; T51n2076, p461b24-26)
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Astus
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Location: Budapest

Re: Meaningful in Tibetan

Postby dzogchungpa » Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:54 am

Astus wrote:
dzogchungpa wrote:As far as I know, 'dang ldan' and 'ldan' are synonymous,...


It still makes no sense in the text itself. I'd like to understand why the word "meaningful" is used. I assumed that it would be understandable in Tibetan, but if the original contains no other meaning either - and that is what I really want to find out - then there's no difference between the English and the original.

From what I can tell, the passage means that just as a river is continuously flowing, the meaningfulness or beneficial quality of your activity will also be continuous. "don" here may be related to the 2 benefits or "don gnyis" see:
http://rywiki.tsadra.org/index.php/don_gnyis
Note that, in the higher tantras, there is talk of a self and an I, even though in the lower teachings the absence of self and the absence of I is what is always proclaimed. - Tony Duff
To educate the educated is notoriously difficult. - Jacques Barzun
སརྦ་དྷརྨ་དྷཱ་ཏུ་ཨཱཏྨ་ཀོ་྅ཧཾ༔
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