Meaningful in Tibetan

Looking for translations, or for help with translations and transliterations? This is the place.
User avatar
Astus
Former staff member
Posts: 6119
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:22 pm
Location: Budapest

Meaningful in Tibetan

Postby Astus » Fri Jan 17, 2014 11:38 pm

What is "meaningful" in this poem,

"Like the continuous flow of a great river,
Whatever you do is meaningful."
(Thrangu Rinpoche: Songs of Naropa, p. 99; the verse; in Tibetan)

Could someone explain this word, what it is in Tibetan, its use, etc.?

འབབ་ལྟར། །ཇི་ལྟར་སྤྱད་ཀྱང་དོན་དང་ལྡན།
'bab ltar / ji ltar spyad kyang don dang ldan

The dictionary says "don dang ldan" stands for:

JH-ENG connected with the meaning
JH-OE {C}intent on what is beneficial
JH-SKT {C}artha-yukta

So I presume here "meaningful" (arthayukta - is that only a back translation, or there is such a term in Indian Buddhism?) actually stands for the unlimited compassionate activities of liberating all beings. However, if I just look at the English, the word does not convey such a meaning. Therefore my question.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

User avatar
dzogchungpa
Posts: 4466
Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 10:50 pm

Re: Meaningful in Tibetan

Postby dzogchungpa » Fri Jan 17, 2014 11:46 pm

As far as I know, 'dang ldan' and 'ldan' are synonymous, and basically just mean "with' or "having' etc. Probably 'dang ldan' is used for metrical purposes.
So 'don dang ldan' would just mean "having don", i.e. meaningful, valuable, significant etc.
see:
http://rywiki.tsadra.org/index.php/don_ldan
The whole purpose of Buddhism is to have fun, isn't it? - Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche

User avatar
Astus
Former staff member
Posts: 6119
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:22 pm
Location: Budapest

Re: Meaningful in Tibetan

Postby Astus » Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:45 am

dzogchungpa wrote:As far as I know, 'dang ldan' and 'ldan' are synonymous,...


It still makes no sense in the text itself. I'd like to understand why the word "meaningful" is used. I assumed that it would be understandable in Tibetan, but if the original contains no other meaning either - and that is what I really want to find out - then there's no difference between the English and the original.
1 Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

2 If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

3 Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

4 With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.


1 Huangbo, T2012Ap381c1 2 Nirvana Sutra, T374p521b3; tr. Yamamoto 3 Mazu, X1321p3b23; tr. J. Jia 4 Yongjia, T2014p395c14; tr. from "The Sword of Wisdom"

User avatar
dzogchungpa
Posts: 4466
Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 10:50 pm

Re: Meaningful in Tibetan

Postby dzogchungpa » Sat Jan 18, 2014 12:54 am

Astus wrote:
dzogchungpa wrote:As far as I know, 'dang ldan' and 'ldan' are synonymous,...


It still makes no sense in the text itself. I'd like to understand why the word "meaningful" is used. I assumed that it would be understandable in Tibetan, but if the original contains no other meaning either - and that is what I really want to find out - then there's no difference between the English and the original.

From what I can tell, the passage means that just as a river is continuously flowing, the meaningfulness or beneficial quality of your activity will also be continuous. "don" here may be related to the 2 benefits or "don gnyis" see:
http://rywiki.tsadra.org/index.php/don_gnyis
The whole purpose of Buddhism is to have fun, isn't it? - Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche


Return to “Language”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests