A good question

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A good question

Postby Wesley1982 » Fri Jun 15, 2012 11:12 pm

What was the Buddha's way of solving objective problems?.. :?
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Re: A good question

Postby plwk » Sat Jun 16, 2012 2:59 am

And how is 'objective problem' defined?
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Re: A good question

Postby Wesley1982 » Sat Jun 16, 2012 3:11 am

For example, persistent technical "problems" that can come from a relative or family member.
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Re: A good question

Postby plwk » Sat Jun 16, 2012 3:29 am

'technical problems' need 'technical details' if ever 'objective answers' are sought...
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Re: A good question

Postby Ogyen » Sat Jun 16, 2012 3:46 am

Wesley1982 wrote:For example, persistent technical "problems" that can come from a relative or family member.



'Persistent technical problems' Like they refuse to work with their wheelchair and make you do it, or refuse to use a cane and are blind and keep stumbling on stuff?

In my experience, 'objective problems' come from 'subjective views', therefore, addressing the subjective view involved with kindness to help the person untie the knots they're putting forth that create the 'objective problem' thrown your way would be most beneficial. Caveat: this is super broad, since objective problems could be your brother in law beating your sister every day.. in which case, the police are needed.

:shrug:
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Re: A good question

Postby Wesley1982 » Sat Jun 16, 2012 3:49 am

I am probably thinking of specific stuff that goes on in retirement homes and assisted living facilities.

The nurses and assistants probably know what I'm talking about.
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Re: A good question

Postby Wesley1982 » Sat Jun 16, 2012 4:08 am

Ogyen wrote:In my experience, 'objective problems' come from 'subjective views', therefore, addressing the subjective view involved with kindness to help the person untie the knots they're putting forth that create the 'objective problem' thrown your way would be most beneficial. Caveat: this is super broad, since objective problems could be your brother in law beating your sister every day.. in which case, the police are needed.


Police are not needed in this instance. I've seen many & many police on the news media channels.
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Re: A good question

Postby Wesley1982 » Sat Jun 16, 2012 4:11 am

Back to the OP ~ how would the Buddha treat family members with chores of responsibility?..
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Re: A good question

Postby Andrew108 » Sat Jun 16, 2012 7:40 am

Help them as much as possible. Just help according to your capacity to help. There is no particular philosophy involved. No need to be buddhist about it.
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"What is the All? Simply the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas. This, monks, is called the All. Anyone who would say, 'Repudiating this All, I will describe another,' if questioned on what exactly might be the grounds for his statement, would be unable to explain, and furthermore, would be put to grief. Why? Because it lies beyond range." Sabba Sutta.
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