Is it wrong to not give up 'everything'?

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Is it wrong to not give up 'everything'?

Postby Loz2212 » Mon Apr 09, 2012 8:18 pm

I have been wondering recently if practising Buddhists give up everything the Buddha teaches, or is there something's that just cant be given up in a non monastic lifestyle? A body builder came into my mind as an example, with meat quite an important source within the diet.

Can anyone share their own experiences and whether it makes you any less of a Buddhist than someone else?

Thanks.
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Re: Is it wrong to not give up 'everything'?

Postby PadmaVonSamba » Tue Apr 10, 2012 4:50 pm

Loz2212 wrote:I have been wondering recently if practising Buddhists give up everything the Buddha teaches, or is there something's that just cant be given up in a non monastic lifestyle? A body builder came into my mind as an example, with meat quite an important source within the diet.

Can anyone share their own experiences and whether it makes you any less of a Buddhist than someone else?

Thanks.


The point is to give up attachment to "me" and "mine". You should enjoy things, enjoy life, without attachment.

If a body builder thinks that all that weight lifting and training will bring lasting happiness, and he or she is attached to the body in that way, then when the body starts to wear out and break down with sickness and old age, that person will experience a lot of suffering, because everything they did (whether they ate meat or not) will be lost.

If the same body builder has the wisdom to understand that the body is a very temporary thing, and uses that wisdom to benefit others, perhaps becoming a famous weightlifter and raising money to help children somehow, or something like that, knowing that he or she only has a few years to do all this good work, then the same body builder will be happy when he or she is old or sick or dying, knowing that they were able to help a lot of people for the brief time they were alive, and did it while doing something they really enjoyed.

So, you can enjoy all kinds of stuff, and many people who think about becoming nuns or monks decide that they will be of more benefit to others if they are not ordained. Bu the the point is to not be attached to any selfish motivation.
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Re: Is it wrong to not give up 'everything'?

Postby plwk » Tue Apr 10, 2012 5:38 pm

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"Monks, I do not say that the attainment of gnosis is all at once.
Rather, the attainment of gnosis is after gradual training, gradual action, gradual practice.
And how is there the attainment of gnosis after gradual training, gradual action, gradual practice?

There is the case where, when conviction has arisen, one visits [a teacher]. Having visited, one grows close.
Having grown close, one lends ear. Having lent ear, one hears the Dhamma. Having heard the Dhamma, one remembers it. Remembering, one penetrates the meaning of the teachings. Penetrating the meaning, one comes to an agreement through pondering the teachings. There being an agreement through pondering the teachings, desire arises.
When desire has arisen, one is willing. When one is willing, one contemplates. Having contemplated, one makes an exertion.
Having made an exertion, one realizes with the body the ultimate truth and, having penetrated it with discernment, sees it.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
Just as the ocean has a gradual shelf, a gradual slope, a gradual inclination, with a sudden drop-off only after a long stretch, in the same way this Doctrine and Discipline has a gradual training, a gradual performance, a gradual progression, with a penetration to gnosis only after a long stretch.

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